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Full text of "Annual report"

Swampscott 

Massachusetts 




Annual Town Report 

July 1, 2008 to June 30, 2009 



One Hundred and Fifty-Seventh 
Annual Report 
Of The Town Officers 



SWAMPSCOTT 
MASS A CHUSETTS 




For the period of July 1, 2008 thru June 30, 2009 



1 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/annualreport2008 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



Swampscott was incorporated as 

Situated: 

Population: 

Area: 

Assessed Valuation: 
Tax Rate: 

Form of Government: 

Governor: 

Attorney General: 

Secretary of the Commonwealth: 

State Legislative Body: 

United States Congress: 

Governor's Council: 
Qualifications of Voters: 



Registration: 



Where to Vote: 



Tax BUls: 



a town on May 21, 1852 

About 15 miles northeast of Boston 

State Census 2000 - 14,412. Persons of all ages are counted 
every year in Town Census. 

3.5 square miles 

$2,544,363,929 

$14.34 Residential and Open Space 
$26.63 Commercial, Industrial, Personal 

Representative Town Meeting 

Elihu Thomson Administration Building . 

22 Monument Avenue 

Swampscott, Massachusetts 01907 

Deval Patrick 

Martha Coakley 

William Francis Galvin 

Representing Swampscott: 

Senator Thomas Magee of Lynn (3'^'' Essex and Middlesex ) 
Representative Lori A. Ehrlich (S"' Essex District) 

Senator Edward Kennedy 
Senator John Kerry 

Representative John Tiemey (6"" Congressional District) 

Mary-BUen Manning (5* District) 

Must be 18 years, bom in the United States or fully 
naturalized in accordance with the provisions in Ch. 587, Acts 
of 1972 and CH. 853, Acts of 1973. There is no resident 
duration requirement for "who is a resident in the city or town 
where he claims the right to vote at the time he registers' may 
register. 

Monday through Thursday 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Friday 8:00 
a.rh. to 12:00 p.m. These hours are subject to change. Special 
hours are help preceding and election. 

Precincts 1 and 2 -Clarke School, Norfolk Avenue 
Precincts 3 and 4 -First Congregational, Monument Avenue 
Precincts 5 and 6 - Swampscott Middle School, Forest Avenue 

Property Taxes are assessed on a fiscal year basis, which 
begins on July 1 and ends on June 30. Payments are due 
quarterly on August 1 , November 1 , February 1 and May 1 . 



3 



OFFICE 



Swampscott 
Elected Officials 



MODERATOR 

Martin Goldman 2010 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

Anthony A Scibelli 2010 

Eric Walker 2010 

Robert Mazow 2011 

Jill Sullivan 2011 

Matthew W. Strauss 2012 

BOARD OF ASSESSORS 

Neil G. Sheehan 2010 

William C. Sullivan III 2011 

Linda L. Paster 2012 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Neil S Bernstein 2010 

Joseph P Crimmins 2010 

Maureen Thomsen 2011 

Glenn P Paster 2011 

Jacqueline Kinney 2012 

TRUSTEE OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY 

Joanne Vanderburg 2010 

Jonathan A Penyack 2011 

John Karwowski 2012 

BOARD OF HEALTH 

Lawrence S Block MD 2010 

Martha Dansdill 2011 

Nelson Kessler 2012 

PLANNING BOARD 

John V. Phelan III 2010 

Bruce E Paradise 2011 

Angela Ippolito 2012 

Eugene Barden 2013 

Patrick Jones 2014 

HOUSING AUTHORITY 

Barbara Eldridge 2010 

Albert DiLisio 2011 

Richard M. Callahan 2013 

James L. Hughes 2014 

CONSTABLE 

Robert Donnelly 2010 

Paul Minsky 2010 

Stephen B. Simmons 2010 



4 



SWAMPSCOTT DEMOCRATIC TOWN COMMITTEE 



Mar-09 



OFFICERS 

Edwards, Ralph (Chair) 
Moynlhan, John (Vice Chair) 
Weiner, Frances (Vice Chair) 
Esteverena, Alex (Clerk) 
Moss, Connie (Treasurer) 

Adams, Ryan (Young Dem. Init) 
Bench, Clinton (Community Forum) 
DechillO, Mary (Special Projects) 
JakiOUS, Rick (NafI Service Prc^) 
Moss, Evan (Young Dem. Init.) 
REGULAR MEMBERS 
Akim, Marta 
Archilla, Cesar 
Baker, Edythe* 
Baker, Robert* 

Blonder, Jeffrey* 
Boschetti, John 
DiPesa, Ralph (Skip)* 
Dreeben, Naomi 
Esteverena, Catherine Smith 
Farber-Robertson, Anita 
Frenkel, Lenora 
Frenkel, Rich 
Fridman, Nanette 
Green, Collette 
Green, John 
Greenstein, Michael 
lannaccone, Steve 
Jones, Carolyn 
Jones, William 
Kaufman, Iris 
Kaufman, Nancy 
Kearney, Sheila* 
Mauriello, Chris 
Mueller, Loretta 
Mulgay, Mark 
Patrikis, Ted 
Peterson, Faith 
Peterson, Jim 
Phelan, John 
Shutzer, Carole 
Smith, Jim* 
Somer, Margaret* 
Spathanas, Laura Coppola 

* Lifetime 20 Year Members 
ASSOCIATE MEMBERS 
Comiier, Kathy 



5 



Driscoll, Tom* 
Kalman, Ed 
Rosenthal, Burt* 
Smullin, Mix* 
Thomsen, Maureen 
Watson, Brian* 
Weiss, Gerdy* 



6 



Swampscott Republican Town Committee 



Susan Withrow, Chairman 
Richard Gindes, Vice Chairman 
David Whelan, Treasurer 
Theresa Keeter, Secretary 

Mounzer Aylouche 
Charles Baker 
Judith Bevis 
Ronald Brooks 
Michael Burke 
Michael Campbell 
Amber DeBole 
Paul DeBole 
Ross DiPietro 
Mia Facella 
Dianne Fan joy 
Jill Hart 
Timothy Keeter 
Michael Kelleher 
Nancy Kelly 
Michael Kramer 
Marc McHugh 
Paul Minsky 
Scott Noonan 
Frank O'Donnell 
Edward Palleschi 
Leah Porter 
Ida Puopolo Elhassani 
Dorothy Ross 
Joseph Ross 
Michael Schwartzman 
Dana Swanstrom 
Alexander Tennant 
Cindy Tennant 
Esther Tibbetts 
Jefferson Willetts 

Associate Members: 

Kenneth Chiarello 
Katherine Kozitza 
Cynthia Tennant 
Andrew Withrow' 
Robert Withrow 



Swampscott Town Hall 



1^' Floor 

Assessor's Office 781-596-8858 / Purchasing 781-596-8810 

All questions pertaining to the valuation of real and personal property 

All questions pertaining to personal property and real estate tax exemptions and abatements 

All questions regarding motor vehicle excise and boat excise/mooring valuation and abatements 

Tax maps and real and personal property field cards 

Senior work-off program 

Questions regarding the Town's pending and prospective procurement of goods and services 
Building Department 781-596-8857 

Permit issuance for: Building, Plumbing, Gas, Electrical, Mechanical and Sign 
Inspection & approval of work associated with these permits 

Questions pertaining to all applicable codes (ie: building & plumbing) and Zoning By-Law 

Assist with applications to the Planning Board, Zoning Board of Appeals and Conservation Commission 

Periodical inspections of all churches, schools, restaurants & multi-family buildings 

Clerk 791-596-8855 

Birth, Death & Marriage Records 

Business Certificates 

Census 

Dog Licenses 

Election Information 

Marriage Licenses 

Notary Public 

Street & Resident Directory 

Voter Registration 

Annual Report 

Collector's Office 781-596-8856 

Collection of Real Estate, Personal Property, Motor Vehicle Excise Tax and Boat Excise Tax 
Collection of Water/Sewer bills 
Questions on payments or amounts due 
Collection of departmental receipts 
Collection of Mooring Fees 

Treasurer's Office 781-596-8852 

Employee Insurance & Benefits 
Employee Payroll 

Payments or questions on bounced checks 
2"** Floor 

Health Department 781-596-8864 
All Trash & Recycling issues 
Animal Control 
Health Clinics 

Permits for food/restaurants, dumpsters, burial, summer camps, wells, rooming houses, pools & hot tubs, tanning 

booths, porta-potties, body art (tattoos) and building demolition 

Beach water testing 

Recreation Stickers 

Recreation sign-up sheets 

Senior work-off program scheduling 



8 



Conservation questions & information 

Abutter maps & labels for the Zoning Board of Appeals & Conservation Commission 

Personnel 781-596-8859 

Employee personnel records 

Records all injuries while on duty for all town employees 
Family Medical Leave Act questions 
Town Personnel policies 
Civil Service questions 

Board/Committee/Commission appointment notification 
Contract interpretation 
Hiring/available positions 
Liaison to the Personnel Board 
Liaison to the Ethics Commission 

Department of Public Works 781-596-8860 

Engineering 

Water/Sewer 

Cemetery 

Forestry 

Sidewalks 

Highway (street defects, potholes, paving, line painting etc.) 
Snow Removal/Sanding 

Streetlights (reporting of outages only contact National Grid for metal poles, DPW handles wooden poles) 

Signage (street, traffic, etc.) 

Lawn/leaf permits 

Boat trailer storage permits 

Beaches 

Traffic Signals 

Recreation 781-596-8854 

Winter & Summer recreation programs 
Issues field permits 

Selectmen/Town Administrator 781-596-8850 

Liquor licenses / One day liquor permits 
Class II Car Dealer licenses 
Entertainment licenses 
Common victualler's permit 
Block party applications 
Weights & measures 
Notary services 
Community channel request 

3^" Floor 

Accounting781-596-88 77 

Accounts payable 
Parking tickets 
Town Budget 
Town Audit 

Retirement 781-596-8827 
Retirement benefits 
Retiree investment questions 

9 



Return of notarized affidavits 
Notice of deaths to retiree or survivor 

Retiree check issues (changing banks, direct deposit, refunds, transfers, etc) 
DisabiHties to retirees 

Planning Board and/or Zoning Board of Appeals 
Contact Helen Kennedy at: hkelken(S)verizon.net 



10 



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SERVICE TO THE TOWN OF SWAMPSCOTT 



On behalf of the citizens of Swampscott, The Board of Selectmen and the 
Town Administrator would like to take this opportunity to express their 
appreciation to the many wonderful employees for their dedication and commitment 
in providing quality services to the Town, to wish those who have retired well in 
their future endeavors and to offer sincere condolences to the families and friends of 
those who have passed during the year. 

The Board and the Town Administrator would also like to express gratitude 
to those who have served and those who continue to serve on the various Boards, 
Committees and Commissions. The Board and the Town Administrator recognize 
the time and the effort that is given to Town service and wish to thank you for your 
knowledge, support and interest in the Town. 



FY2008 Deceased Retirees 
IN MEMORIAM 



Kelly Gordon 
Carol Dedrick 
Carl Reardon 
John Daley 



10/26/08 
08/26/08 
07/29/08 
06/01/09 
01/27/09 
04/13/09 
05/2//09 
02/12/09 
02/05/09 



Police dept 
School Dept 
Public Works 
Police Dept 
Police Dept. 
School Dept. 
School Dept. 
School Dept. 
School Dept 



James Pedrick 
Cynthia Lang 



Raymond McCauley 
Jane Watts 
Jane Whittier 



FY2008 Retirees 



Richard Carmody 
Frederick Brown 
Peter Cassidy 
Michael Collins 



07/07/08 
01/27/09 
03/16/09 
04/13/09 



Police Dept. 
Police Dept 
Public Works 



Fire Department 



FY2008 (July 1, 2007 thru June 30, 2008) 



13 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 
TOWN ADMINISTRATOR 



The following pages contain excerpts from the approved minutes from each of the 
twenty-seven (27) Selectmen's meetings held during Fiscal 2009. These minutes are not 
intended to provide the reader with a comprehensive list of all the business before the Board 
during FY09, but instead are intended to provide an overview of the issues addressed by the 
Board, and various votes taken by the Board, from July 1, 2008, through June 30, 2009. 



During Fiscal 2009, the Board of Selectmen and the Town Administrator, along with a 
dedicated and professional staff, continued the process of managing the affairs of the Town 
during a period of extreme fiscal uncertainty. We restate our commitment to work diligently on 
improving service delivery to residents and business owners of the Town of Swampscott. 



The Board and the Town Administrator would like to take this opportunity to express their 
sincere appreciation to all those individuals who have taken time away from their families and 
friends to serve on the many committees, commissions and boards that are the lifeblood of the 
town. The Board and the Town Administrator are grateful for the depth of experience and talent 
that each individual brings to these committees. We would also like to recognize Administrative 
Assistant. Maureen Shultz for her continued devotion to serving the public and assisting the Town 
Administrator and the Board. 



It is both an honor and a privilege to serve the Town as members of the Board of 
Selectmen and we appreciate the opportunity you have given each of us to do so. 



Respectfully submitted, 

The Swampscott Board of Selectmen 

Eric A. Walker, Chairman 
Jill G. Sullivan, Vice Chairman 
Robert E. Mazow 
Anthony A. Scibelli 
Matthew Strauss 

Andrew W. Maylor, Town Administrator 



14 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 
Tuesday, July 8, 2008 
Excerpts of Approved Minutes 



Attendance: Chairman, Anthony A. Scibelli, Selectmen Adam P. Forman, Robert E. Mazow, Jill 
G. Sullivan and Town Administrator, Andrew W. Maylor. 

Open Session / Discussion 

A letter written by Fire Chief Carmody was read regarding the recent fire on Forest Avenue. 

Mr. Michael Gibeault addressed the Board and questioned why he was not being re-appointed to 
the Rail Trail Implementation Committee. Selectman Forman had a dialogue and explained that 
Town Meeting endorsed building a Rail Trail and Selectman Forman believes it is not Mr. 
Gibeaults objective to fulfill the intent of Town meeting. 

Appointments: 

Upon the recommendation of the Town Administrator, the Board voted unanimously on a motion 
by Selectman Forman to re-appoint members to various Boards and Committee's seconded by 
Selectman Mazow. 

Upon the recommendation of the Town Administrator, the Board voted unanimously on a motion 
by Selectman Forman to appoint Michael Champion as Acting Fire Chief effective until June 30, 
2009, seconded by Selectman Mazow. 



Upon the recommendation of the Town Administrator, the Board voted unanimously on a motion 
by Selectman Sullivan to appoint Kevin Breen as Acting Deputy Chief effective until June 30, 
2009, seconded by Selectman Mazow. 

Votes of the Board: 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Forman to approve an Easement 
Agreement between Verizon New England Inc, and the Town of Swampscott seconded by 
Selectman Sullivan. 



Town Administrator's Report: 

Andrew W. Maylor, Town Administrator spoke on the following items: 

> Recycling Collection Change 

> Upcoming Circus 

> Performance Contracting for Energy Efficiency services 

> Preliminary FY1 Budget scenarios by July 30. 2008 



15 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 
Tuesday, July 15, 2008 
Excerpts of Approved Minutes 



Attendance: Chairman, Anthony Scibelli, Selectman Adam P. Forman, Robert E. Mazow, Jill G. 
Sullivan and Town Administrator, Andrew W. Maylor. 

Votes of the Board: 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Sullivan to approve the year end FY08 
Shuffle as recommended by the Town Accountant, Dave Castellarin seconded by Selectman 
Forman 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 
Tuesday, July 22, 2008 
Excerpts of Approved Minutes 



Attendance: Chairman, Anthony A. Scibelli, Vice Chairman, Eric A. Walker, Selectman Adam P. 
Forman, Robert E. Mazow, Jill G. Sullivan and Town Administrator, Andrew W. Maylor. 

Open Session / Discussion : 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Sullivan to extend the Earth Removal 
Permit for Aggregate Industries -Northeast Division, Inc to August 19, 2008, with no restrictions 
on summer hours seconded by Selectman Wall<er. 

Appointment: 

Upon the recommendation of the Town Administrator, the Board voted unanimously on a motion 
by Selectman Sullivan to appoint Diane Folan, 26 Fellsmere Street, Lynn, Mass to a part time 
clerical position in the Assessor's office pending Physical and CORI seconded by Selectman 
Mazow. 



Votes of the Board: 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Sullivan to approve an agreement 
between Verizon New England Inc and the Town of Swampscott regarding deployment of Public 
Education & Government Programming seconded by Selectman Mazow. 



The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Mazow to approve the 5 Annual Phil's 
Fun Run request from Susan Heffernan seconded by Selectman Forman. 



The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Forman to accept the Swampscott 
Middle School as a Town Building seconded by Selectman Walker. 



Other: 

A discussion was held on a request by Jessica O'Gorman to hang a "No Place For Hate" banner 
on Town Hall. Andrew Maylor, Town Administrator suggested he would work with Gino Cresta, 
DPW Director to locate a suitable location in place of hanging banner's on Town Buildings. 



16 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 



Tuesday, August 5, 2008 
Excerpts of Approved Minutes 



Attendance: Chairman, Anthony A. Scibelli, Vice Chairman Eric A. Walker, Selectmen Adam P. 
Forman , Robert E. Mazow, Jill G. Sullivan and Town Administrator, Andrew W. Maylor. 



Votes of the Board: 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Forman to approve a request from the 
Swampscott Police Department to post signs relating to MGL Chapter 138 Section 34A "Any 
person under 21Yrs " at each establishment in Town that holds a Liquor License seconded by 
Selectman Walker. 



Public Hearing : 

The Board voted on a motion by Selectman Forman to approve the following rates: 

> FY OGWater Rate to stay the same at $5.22. 

> Sewer Rate will increase from $3.65 to $4.35. 

> FY09 Base Charges will be $1 1 .00 for Water and $8.75 for Sewer 

> Abatement program of $79.00 per year if seniors over the age of 75 use less than 30 
HCF of water in any fiscal year 

seconded by Selectman Walker. 

Appointment: 

Upon the recommendation of the Town Administrator, the Board voted unanimously on a motion 
by Selectman Forman to appoint Peter Spellios as a regular member of the Zoning Board of 
Appeals seconded by Selectman Sullivan. 

Upon the recommendation of the Town Administrator, the Board voted 4-1 in favor on a motion by 
Selectman Walker to appoint Andrew Rose as an Associate Member of the Zoning Board of 
Appeals seconded by Selectman Sullivan. Selectman Scibelli voted against the motion. 

Upon the recommendation of the Town Administrator, the Board voted unanimously on a motion 
by Selectman Mazow to appoint Marc Kornitsky as an Associate Member to the Zoning Board of 
Appeals seconded by Selectman Sullivan 



TOWN ADMINISTRATOR'S REPORT: 

Andrew W. Maylor spoke on the following: 

> State Transportation Bond bill for improvements for paving on Humphrey Street and 
streetscape projects along Humphrey Street which could include sidewalks, trees, and 
other improvements. Mr. Maylor spoke on inviting State Representative Lori Ehrlich to a 
future meeting to discuss the above improvements. 



17 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 
Saturday, August 16, 2008 
Excerpts from Approved Minutes 

A meeting of the Board of Selectmen was held at the Swampscott Town Hall, 22 Monument 
Avenue. Swampscott, Mass. Vice Chairman Eric A. Wall<er opened the meeting at 7:30A.M. 

Attendance: Vice Chairman Eric A. Wall<er, Selectmen Adam P. Forman, Robert E. Mazow and 
Acting Town Administrator, Dave Castellarin. 

Votes of the Board: 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Forman to approve a one day liquor 
permit for the Clifton Improvement Association to be used on Saturday, August 16, 2008, from 4- 
8P.M. seconded by Selectman Mazow. 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 
Tuesday, August 19, 2008 
Excerpts of Approved Minutes 

Attendance: Chairman, Anthony A. Scibelli, Vice Chairman, Eric A. Walker, Selectmen Adam P. 
Forman, Robert E. Mazow, Jill G. Sullivan and Town Administrator, Andrew W. Maylor. 

Public Hearing : 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Mazow to approve Aggregate Industries 
-Northeast Region, Inc annual permit from July 1, 2008 through June 30, 2009, seconded by 
Selectman Forman. 

Votes of the Board: 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Mazow to approve a request to hold the 
third annual "Miles for Kyle" walk to be held on Sunday, October 26, 2008 seconded by 
Selectman Sullivan. 



The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Sullivan to approve a request from the 
Swampscott Police Department to hold their annual holiday parade on December 13, 2008 
seconded by Selectman Walker. 



Discussion: 

The Board listened to an update from Richard Grant, Arborist of Leahy Landscaping Inc on his 
assessment of trees in Town that were recently recommended by National Grid to be removed. 

The Board voted on a motion By Selectman Forman to remove ten trees in Town that have been 
recommended by National Grid to be removed due to their condition at the following locations, 47 
Franklin Street, 48 Franklin Street, 36 Franklin Street, 125 Stetson Avenue, 125 Stetson Avenue, 
138 Stetson Avenue, 145 Stetson Avenue, 158 Essex Street, 154 Essex Street , 14 Essex Street, 
that had been recommended by National Grid to be removed due to their condition seconded by 
Selectman Sullivan . 



18 



Town Administrator Report: 



Andrew W. Maylor informed the Board and the residents on plans to move the Jared Raymond 
Square form its original location at Bumll and Essex Street to the corner of Danvers Road and 
Essex Street. 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 
Tuesday, September 2, 2008 
Excerpts of Approved Minutes 



Attendance: Chairman, Anthony A. Scibelli, Vice Chairman, Eric A. Walker, Selectmen Adam P. 
Forman, Robert E. Mazow, Jill G. Sullivan and Town Administrator, Andrew W. Maylor. 

Public 1-iearinq : 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Forman to affirm that a violation had 
taken place with regards to the sting operation held on February 8, 2008, in which Hawthorne by 
the Sea served an alcoholic beverage to an underaged person, seconded by Selectman Walker. 

The Board voted 4-1 in favor of a motion by Selectman Forman to impose a one day suspension 
to be served on a Friday within the next four weeks seconded by Selectman Walker. Selectman 
Mazow opposed this motion. 

The Board voted 4-1 in favor of a motion by Selectman Forman to accept the following statement 
of reasons to impose a one day liquor license suspension on Hawthorne by the Sea, "the Board 
views serving a minor liquor as a serious offense, the Board feels the license holder has a 
responsibility to keep liquor out of the hands of minors , the Board feels it is the most critical 
aspect of the liquor license laws to make sure minors are not served, our goal is to impose a 
penalty to deter this license holder and all license holders in the Community so that there is no 
future violations, our goal is to adopt a unified approach that is calibrated to the nature of the 
offense, and our goal is to punish the license holder for violating the law , seconded by Selectman 
Walker. 

Selectman Mazow opposed the motion. 
Appointment: 

Upon the recommendation of the Town Administrator, the Board voted unanimously on a motion 
by Selectman Mazow to appoint William D. Vousboukis as a permanent firefighter for the 
Swampscott Fire Department seconded by Selectman Sullivan. 



Upon the recommendation of the Town Administrator, the Board voted unanimously on a motion 
by Selectman Sullivan to appoint Michael T. Bagneil as a permanent firefighter for the 
Swampscott Fire Department seconded by Selectman Forman. 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 
Tuesday, September 16, 2008 
Excerpts of Approved Minutes 



Attendance: Chairman, Anthony A. Scibelli Vice Chairman, Eric A. Walker , Selectmen Adam P. 
Forman, Robert E. Mazow, Jill G. Sullivan and Town Administrator, Andrew W. Maylor. 



19 



Recognition: 

A letter of recognition was read and presented by Chairman Scibelli to Geralyn Faico for her 15 
years as a mennber and Chairman of the Conservation Committee. 

Discussion: 

Marc Eichler of the Swampscott Ad Hoc Park Committee spoke on a proposal to establish a dog 
play area in the community. Selectman Sullivan suggested the Board add this as a topic of 
discussion at the next meeting of the Board of Selectman to be held on October 7, 2008, to give 
time for the public to voice any questions and or concerns. 

Public Hearing : 

The Board voted on a motion by Selectmen Forman to re-open the continued public hearing from 
September 2, 2008, on a request from Paradise Citgo, 219 Paradise Road, Swampscott, Mass 
for a Class II License seconded by Selectman Mazow. 

A discussion was held on the above request. 

The Board voted on a motion by Selectman Forman to close the public hearing seconded by 
Selectman Walker. 

The Board voted 3 to 2 in favor on a motion by Selectman Mazow to approve a Class II Car 
Dealers License for Paradise Citgo, 219 Paradise Road , Swampscott, Mass the license has 
been approved to sell up to no more than four (4) vehicles on the premises at any one time 
seconded by Selectman Forman. Selectman Sullivan and Selectman Walker apposed the 
motion. 



Traffic Related: 

The Board discussed a request from resident Eric Lagerquist to place a "No Drop Off Sign" to be 
placed on Murial Road. 

A motion was made by Selectman Mazow to approve the above request for a "No Drop Off Sign" 
to be placed on Murial Road, no second motion followed, motion failed. 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 
Tuesday, October 7, 2008 
Excerpts of Approved Minutes 



Attendance: Chairman, Anthony A. Scibelli, Vice Chairman , Eric A. Walker , Selectmen Adam P. 
Forman, Robert A. Mazow, Jill G. Sullivan and Town Administrator, Andrew W. Maylor. 

Open Session / Discussion: 

The Board discussed the following: 

> Murial Road & Charlotte Road / Eric Laderquist of Murial Road, thanked the Board for 
their support with the drop off and no parking issues. Scott Faulkner of the Swampscott 
Youth Football program spoke on problems the no drop off can create by a few parents 
that don't follow the rules, however he feels it is not fair to jeopardize his field use permit 
for the actions he believes is of around 30 or so individuals , he is willing to continue to 
work with the parents on resolving this issue. 

> Marc Eichler / Dog Park proposal. 

> The Board spoke in favor of supporting a request from the City of Lynn to place Good 
Health Partnership Signs along Humphrey Street. 



20 



Resignation: 

The Board accepted the resignation of Jeffrey Blonder of the Planning Board after sixteen years 
of service and commitment to the Town. 

Votes of the Board: 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Forman to approve and support Marc 
Eichler and the Swampscott Ad-Hoc Dog Park Committee's proposal with the understanding that 
they would need to come back before the Board prior to ground being broken on the project , 
seconded by Selectman Walker. 



The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Sullivan to approve Town Meeting 



Town Administrator's Report: 

Andrew Maylor, Town Administrator spoke on the following: 

> New Street Light Maintenance Company. 

> Recognized Renewable Energy Committee. 

> Financial Forecast schedule. 

> Recognized Maureen Shultz, Administrative Assistant for her completion of meeting 
minutes in a timely fashion. 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 
Tuesday, October 14, 2008 
Excerpts of Approved Minutes 



Attendance: Chairman, Anthony A. Scibelli, Vice Chairman, Eric A. Walker, Selectmen Adam P. 
Forman, Robert E. Mazow , Jill G. Sullivan and Town Administrator, Andrew W. Maylor. 

Appointment: 

Upon the recommendation of the Town Administrator, the Board voted unanimously on a motion 
by Selectman Forman to appoint Mary Webster to the Recreation Committee for a three year 
term, seconded by Selectman Walker. 



Votes of the Board: 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Forman to approve Special Town 
Meeting Warrant, seconded by Selectman Sullivan. 



The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Sullivan to approve a request from the 
Lynn Area Chamber of Commerce to hang a banner at Phillips Park to advertise the Swampscott 
Home & Garden Show, seconded by Selectman Mazow. 



The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Walker to accept a donation from the 
Friends of Swampscott Sailing for two racing boats to be used in the Town Sailing Programs, 
seconded, by Selectman Mazow. 



21 



SELECTMEN'S TIME: 



Selectman Scibelli recognized and congratulated Denise Dembkoski , Town Treasurer for her 
recent award from the Massachusetts Treasurer and Collectors Association which she will 
receive at a ceremony to be held on December 10, 2008. 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 
Tuesday, October 28, 2008 
Excerpts of Approved Minutes 



Attendance: Chairman, Anthony A. Scibelli, Vice Chairman, Eric A. Walker , Selectmen Robert E. 
Mazow, Eric A. Walker, Jill G. Sullivan and Town Administrator, Andrew W. Maylor. 

Open Session / Discussion: 

Selectman Scibelli spoke on the extension deadline of the GIC. The Board has decided the best 
thing to do at this time is to move forward and have Andrew Maylor, Town Administrator work 
towards finding other ways to help with the cost of Insurance during these tough budget times. 

Votes of the Board: 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Sullivan to approve the disposition of 
the former Burrill Street Senior Center, seconded by Selectman Forman. 



The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Sullivan to approve the disposition of 
the former Phillips Beach Fire Station, seconded by Selectman Walker. 



The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Walker to approve and support the 
recommendations of the Town Building Oversight Committee, seconded by Selectmen Forman. 



The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Forman to approve the meeting minutes 
from October 7, 2008, seconded by Selectman Mazow. 



The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Sullivan to approve overhanging sign' 
permit for London Hair Design, 150 Humphrey Street, Swampscott, Mass, seconded by 
Selectman Mazow. 



The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Mazow to approve Andrew W. Maylor, 
Town Administrator's performance evaluation, seconded by Selectman Sullivan. 



Town Administrator's Report: 

Andrew W. Maylor, Town Administrator spoke on the following topics: 

> Budget / Non School lay offs. 

> Resignation of Danielle McKnight, Town Planner 

> Financial Forecast to be held on November 10, 2008. 

> Not recommending vacant Firefighter position. 



22 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 
Monday, November 10, 2008 
Excerpts of Approved Minutes 



Attendance: Chairman, Anthony A. Scibelli, Vice Chairman Eric A. Walker, Selectmen Adam P. 
Forman , Robert A. Mazow , Jill G. Sullivan and Town Administrator, Andrew W. Maylor. 

Votes of the Board: 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Walker to approve the following motion 
that the Board of Selectman accept the provisions of MGL 32B, Section 19, as amended, relative 
to coalition bargaining, for the exclusive purpose of negotiating a Public Employee Committee 
Agreement (PEC Agreement) with the employee unions and retirees to participate in the State's 
Group Insurance Commission's (GIC) health insurance program. Said authority will only be valid 
until December 1 , 2008, after which time, if an agreement cannot be reached, the Town will revert 
back to MGL 150E for the purpose of bargaining changes to the employee health insurance, 
seconded by Selectman Sullivan. 



Town Administrator's Presentation: 

Andrew W. Maylor , Town Administrator presented the Financial Forecast. 



Discussion / Hearing: 

Chairman Scibelli read aloud the Police report on the violation of Gourmet Gardens, 430 Paradise 
Road, Swampscott, Mass on the minimum age compliance check relating to their liquor license. 



Chairman Scibelli asked if there was anyone to speak on behalf of Gounnet Gardens. 



Mr. Gene Nigrelll, representative of Gourmet Gardens spoke on their behalf and apologized to the 
Board and the Town and commented on how this is Gourmet Gardens second offensive for the 
same violation and the owners are clearly embarrassed. Gourmet Gardens asked for some help 
and guidelines possibly from the Swampscott Police Department to ensure themselves they are 
doing everything they can so this violation does not happen again. 



The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Sullivan to suspend Gourmet Gardens 
liquor license for three (3) days to take effect on Wednesday, November 12, 2008, Thursday, 
November 13, 2008 and Friday, November 14, 2008, seconded by Selectman Forman. 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 
Tuesday, November 25, 2008 
Excerpts of Approved Minutes 



Attendance: Chairman, Anthony A. Scibelli, Vice Chairman Eric A. Walker, Selectman Adam P. 
Forman, Jill G. Sullivan and Town Administrator, Andrew W. Maylor. 



23 



Votes of the Board: 



The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Sullivan to approve the agreement 
offered by the PEC seconded by Selectman Mazow. 



Appointment: 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Walker to appoint Charles Borgioli to 
the Harbor Advisory Committee seconded by Selectman Sullivan. 



Public Hearing: 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Sullivan to open Public Hearing for 
Classification of Real and Property Tax with the Board of Assessors seconded by Selectman 
Forman. 



Chairman of the Board of Assessors, Neil Sheehan and Assistant Assessor, Donna Champagne 
O'Keefe discussed with the Board their report concerning the adoption of residential factor to 
determine the percentage of tax burden to be borne by each class of property for fiscal year 
2009.The Assistant Assessor and the Board of Assessors recommend a residential tax rate of 
$14.34 and a commercial, industrial and personal rate of $26.64. 

Chairman Sclbelli opened the floor up for any comments from the public, which there was none. 
Chairman Scibelli opened the floor up for any comments by the Board, 



The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Walker to close Public Hearing 
seconded by Selectman Forman. 



The Board voted 3-1 in favor of the recommendation to increase the tax rate as stated above 
seconded by Selectman Forman. Selectman Walker opposed the motion. 



Town Administrator's Report: 

Andrew W. Maylor, Town Administrator spoke on the following; 

> Update on the GIC. 

> Public hearing on toll hike changes to be held on December 15, 2008, at Lynn City Hall. 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 
Tuesday, December 9, 2008 
Excerpts of Approved Minutes 



Attendance: Chairman, Anthony A. Scibelli, Vice Chairman Eric A. Walker, Selectman Robert E. 
Mazow, Jill G. Sullivan and Town Administrator, Andrew W. Maylor. 

Open Session / Discussion: 

Alice Goldsmith updated the Board on Leadership Symposium and asked for their support. 



24 



Public Hearing: 

The Board voted unanimously on a nnotion by Selectman Walker to open public hearing 
seconded by Selectman Mazow. 

Chairman Scibelli opened the hearing to the public for any questions and or concerns. 
There was no one to speak. The Board discussed briefly the renewal of all liquor licenses. 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Sullivan to dose the public hearing 
seconded by Selectman Mazow. 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Sullivan to approve all 2009 renewal of 
liquor licenses in Town subject to all outstanding balances owed to the Town have been paid, 
approval of the appropriate department heads, proper completion of all paperwork and the fire 
safety certificate has been signed and issued seconded by Selectman Walker. 

Votes of the Board: 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Walker to approve the 2009 renewal 
Brown Bag Permit for Cafe Paulion, 646 Humphrey Street, Swampscott, seconded by Selectman 
Sullivan. 



The Board voted unanimously on a motion Selectman Walker to approve the 2009 renewal of all 
Common Victuaeller's Licenses seconded by Selectman Sullivan 



The Board voted unanimously on a motion Selectman Mazow to approve the 2009 renewal of all 
Entertainment Licenses seconded by Selectman Sullivan. 



The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Mazow to approve the 2009 renewal of 
all Inn Holder's License seconded by Selectman Sullivan. 



The Board voted unanimously on a motion Selectmen Sullivan to approve the 2009 renewal of all 
Class II Licenses seconded by Selectman Walker. The Paradise Citgo's Class II License was not 
approved, they have been requested to attend the next meeting to discuss their license status. 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 
Tuesday, December 23, 2008 
Excerpts of Approved Minutes 



Attendance: Chairman, Anthony A. Scibelli, , Selectman Adam P. Forman, Robert E. Mazow, Jill 
G. Sullivan and Acting Town Administrator, Dave Castellarin. 

Open Discussion: 

Marc Eichler / SPOT Dog spoke to the Board on topics such as banners, message boards and 
fundraising. 

Open Discussion: 

The Board briefly discussed the renewal of a Class II Car Dealers License for Citgo Station, 219 
Paradise Road, Swampscott, Mass. The Board asked if Citgo had filed an application for a 



25 



change of their special permit from the Zoning Board of Appeals which was originally agreed 
upon at a prior meeting. Citgo informed the Board they have not applied for a change from the 
Zoning Board. 

The Board voted on a motion by Selectmen Mazow to renew Citgo's Class II Car Dealers license 
for 2009, there were no second motion, motion failed. 

The Board has requested Citgo to come bacl< to address the Board at their next meeting to be 
held on January 13, 2009 regarding any action they have tal<en with the Zoning Board of appeals 
to amend their special permit. 

Appointment: 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Sullivan to appoint Angela Ippolito to 
the Planning Board seconded by Selectman Forman. Eugene Barden, Chairman to the Planning 
Board recommended Angela Ippolito for this appointment and approved the vote by the Board of 
Selectman. 



Town Administrator's update: 

Dave Castellarin, Acting Town Administrator updated the Board on the DPW snow removal 
expenses brought on by the two most recent snow storms. 



The Board was informed that the Town recently received the 2009 Budget Award for the third 
year in a row. The Board congratulated Dave Castellarin and Andrew Maylor for their work. 



BOARD OF SELECTIMEN 
Tuesday, January 13, 2009 
Excerpts of Approved Minutes 



Attendance: Chairman, Anthony A. Scibelli, Vice Chairman Eric A. Walker, Selectman Adam P. 
Forman, Robert E. Mazow, Jill G. Sullivan and Town Administrator, Andrew W. Maylor. 

Open Session / Discussion: 

Aggregate Industries & ERAC submitted and discussed the recent Noise Mitigation Study for the 
Aggregate industries Rock Quarry with Selectman Forman recusing himself from the discussion. 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Sullivan to accept the recommendation 
of ERAC that the HP400 Crusher that is out of balance be adjusted and the sound baffle be 
installed on one of the two crushers and ERAC return back to the Board prior to April with a 
current new Sound Study, seconded by Selectman Mazow. Selectman Forman recused himself 
from the vote. 

The Board discussed the renewal of the Class II Car Dealers License for Citgo, 219 Paradise 
Road, Swampscott, Mass, with the owner Mr.Ghassan Moussa. The Board has been informed 
that the Citgo has applied through the Zoning Board of Appeals to amend to their special permit. 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Sullivan to approve the renewal of 
Citgo's Class II License for 2009, which includes up to four vehicles for sale, seconded by 
Selectman Forman. 



26 



Votes of the Board: 



The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Walker to approve Activity and Use 
Limitation Phillips Park seconded by Selectman Sullivan. 



Selectmen's Time: 

Selectman Sullivan informed the Board the Zoning By Law Review Committee has received a 
grant in the amount of $10, 000.00 that was initiated by Danielle McKnight the former Town 
Planner. Selectman Sullivan reminded residents of her upcoming office hours to be held on 
Thursday, January 29, 2009, at the Swampscott Town Hall. 



Selectman Walker spoke on the meeting recently held in Lynn on the possible increase of tolls 
suggested by the Mass Turnpike Authority. Selectman Walker spoke positively on the new YMCA 
in Marblehead/Swampscott he recently visited. 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 
Tuesday, January 27, 2009 
Excerpts of Approved Minutes 

Attendance: Chairman, Anthony A. Scibelli, Vice Chairman , Eric A. Walker, Selectman Adam P. 
Forman, Robert E. Mazow, Jill G. Sullivan and Town Administrator, Andrew W. Maylor. 

Open Session / Discussion: 

The Clifton Improvement Association spoke to the Board on a request to place a temporary sign 
for fundraising to rebuild the seawall fronting at Beach Bluff Park. 

The Board voted 4-1 in favor of a motion by Selectman Mazow to approve the above request for 
a temporary sign for four months ending on June 1 , 2009, seconded by Selectmen Forman. 
Selectman Scibelli opposed the motion. 

Appointment: 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Walker to appoint Andrew Maylor, Town 
Administrator as hearing officer for Civil Service layoffs seconded by Selectman Sullivan. 

Votes of the Board: 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Sullivan to approve a change of 
manager request for Uno Chicago Grill, 970 Paradise Road, Swampscott, Mass regarding their 
current liquor license seconded by Selectman Forman. 



The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Mazow to approve a request from Russ 
Patten and Jane Madigan to use Town Hall on April 25, 2009, for their wedding ceremony from 4- 
6pm which will include a fee to be determined by Andrew Maylor, Town Administrator seconded 
by Selectman Walker. 



Town Administrator's Report: 

Andrew W. Maylor, Town Administrator spoke to the Board regarding his FY10 Budget projection. 



27 



Selectman's Time: 



Selectman Mazow commented that there is a sign policy problem here in Town and has 
volunteered to work with Selectman Sullivan and the Zoning By Law Committee to create a 
current sign policy. Selectman Mazow believes that there are good community ideas and events 
that would benefit from this policy. 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 
Tuesday, February 10, 2009 
Excerpts of Approved Minutes 



Attendance: Chairman, Anthony A. Scibelli, Vice Chairman, Eric A. Walker, Selectmen Adam P. 
Forman, Robert E. Mazow, Jill G. Sullivan and Town Administrator, Andrew W. Maylor. 

Open Session / Discussion: 

Andrew W. Maylor, Town Administrator updated the Board on the budget. 
Votes of the Board: 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Walker to approve meeting minutes 
from January 27, 2009 seconded by Selectman Forman. 



The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Forman to approve executive session 
meeting minutes from January 27, 2009 seconded by Selectman Walker. 



The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Walker to approve the following dates 
for the Board of Selectmen meetings to be held on March 10, 2009, March 24, 2009. April 7, 2009 
and April 21, 2009, seconded by Selectman Forman. 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 
Tuesday, February 24, 2009 
Excerpts of Approved Minutes 

Attendance: Chairman, Anthony A. Scibelli, Vice Chairman Eric A. Walker, Selectman Robert E. 
Mazow, Jill G. Sullivan and Town Administrator, Andrew W. Maylor. 

Open Session / Discussion: 

The Capital Improvements Committee updated the Board on their recommended projects for 
funding for Fiscal FY2010. 

Votes of the Board: 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Mazow to approve MWPAT Loan in the 
amount of $342,310.00, seconded by Selectman Walker. 



The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Walker to approve a request for a Road 
Race on behalf of Captain Jennifer J. Harris Educational Trust and the Seven Stars Foundation, 
to be held in May of 2009, seconded by Selectman Mazow. 



The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Walker to approve the Town 
Administrator's FY2010 Budget, seconded by Selectman Sullivan. 



28 



Proclamations: 

Anthony Scibelli, Chairman of the Board of Selectmen read aloud the Silver Star Day 2009 Town 
Proclamation. 



The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Mazow to approve the Silver Star Day 
2009 Town Proclamation, seconded by Selectmen Sullivan. 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 
Tuesday, March 24, 2009 
Excerpts from Approved Minutes 



Attendance: Chairman, Anthony A. Scibelli. Vice Chairman Eric A. Walker, Selectmen Adam P. 
Forman, Jill G. Sullivan and Town Administrator, Andrew W. Maylor. 

Open Session & Update: 

> Members of the Renewable Energy Committee updated the Board. 

> Members of the Swampscott Historical Commission updated the Board on repairs 
needed for Andrew's Chapel. 

> Police Chief Ronald Madigan informed the Board on the Community Oriented Policing 
Services Hiring Recovery Program. The Board took no action at this time. 

Votes of the Board: 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Sullivan to open and to accept the Town 
Meeting Warrant provided by the Town Administrator seconded by Selectman Forman. 



The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Sullivan to approve the Greenwood 
Avenue Middle School property as surplus seconded by Selectman Forman. 



Appointments: 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Walker to appoint Brian Watson to the 
Renewable Energy Committee seconded by Selectman Sullivan. 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Sullivan to appoint Dorothy Allen to the 
Renewable Energy Committee seconded by Selectman Walker. 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Forman to appoint Wayne Spritz to the 
Renewable Energy Committee seconded by Selectman Sullivan. 



Town Administrator's Report: 

Andrew W. Maylor, Town Administrator updated the Board on the following items: 

> Budget process. 

> Stimulus package 

> Recognition was given to Victoria Masone of the DPW and Ed Cronin of the School 
Department for their assistance to the Renewable Energy Committee. 



29 



Selectman Scibelli spoke on his recent involvement on the Search Committee for a new High 
School Principal and informed the Board they are down to four finalists and will continue to go 
forward with choosing one candidate. 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 
Tuesday, April 7, 2009 
Excerpts of Approved Minutes 

Attendance: Chairman, Anthony A. Scibelli, Vice Chairman , Eric A. Walker, Selectman Adam P. 
Forman, Robert E. Mazow, Jill G. Sullivan and Town Administrator, Andrew W. Maylor. 

Open Session / Discussion: 

The Zoning by Law Review Committee updated the Board. 
Votes of the Board: 

The Board voted on a motion to open the Town Meeting Warrant by Selectman Forman 
seconded by Selectman Walker. 



The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Forman to amend the Town Meeting 
Warrant to delete Article 11, seconded by Selectman Sullivan. 



The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Sullivan to amend and revise Article 12 
of the Town Meeting Warrant (Article 12 will appear as Articlellon the final Town Warrant) to 
read as follows: " To see if the Town will vote to create a Police Station Building Committee with 
seven (7) members, of which one (1) shall be the Chief of Police, three (3) others shall be 
appointed by the Board of Selectmen and the remaining three (3) members shall be appointed by 
the Town Moderator. Members of the committee appointed by the Selectmen and the Moderator 
shall be residents of Swampscott who have knowledge and expertise relevant to the charge and 
purposes of said Building Committee. The purpose of said committee shall be to assess the 
feasibility of funding, designing and constructing a new police station. The Building Committee 
shall complete its charge and present its report, which shall include recommendations for further 
Town action, to a Town Meeting to be held no later than the next Annual Town Meeting. 
Sponsored by the Board of Selectmen." seconded by Selectman Walker. 



The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Sullivan to open and accept the Special 
Town Meeting Warrant seconded by Selectman Forman. 



The Board voted on a motion by Selectman Sullivan to accept and close the Town Meeting 
Warrant seconded by Selectman Forman. 



The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Walker to approve the COPS 
(Community Oriented Policing Services ) grant application for one additional police officer 
contingent upon the Chief maintaining the current level of staffing in the Detective Division (3) 
seconded by Selectman Forman. 



30 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 



Tuesday, April 21, 2009 
Excerpts of Approved Minutes 



Attendance: Chairman, Anthony A. Scibelli, , Selectman Adam P. Forman, Robert E. Mazow, Jill 
G. Sullivan and Acting Town Administrator, Dave Castellarin. 

Open Session / Discussion: 

> Selectman Sullivan updated the Board regarding RFP's for the Town owned properties. 

> Chairman Scibelli spoke on parking barriers at the Fish House parking lot. 

> Mr. Jerry Somers representing members of Davenport Drive updated the Board on their 
request for Town Services. 

Votes of the Board: 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Forman to approve a request from 
ARTS to hold their Swampscott Harbor Festival on Saturday. June 20, 2009 pending approval 
from the Swampscott Police Department seconded by Selectman Sullivan. 



The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Mazow to approve the Swampscott 
Dory Run to be held on Memorial Day pending approval from the Swampscott Police Department 
seconded by Selectman Forman. 



The Board voted unanimously on a motion Selectman Sullivan to approve a request from the JCC 
of the North Shore to hold their Triathlon by the Sea event on May 17, 2009 pending approval 
from the Swampscott Police Department seconded by Selectman Forman. 



The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Mazow to open Special Town Meeting 
Warrant to be held on Wednesday, May 6, 2009 at 8P.M seconded by Selectman Sullivan. 



Appointment: 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Sullivan to re-appoint Susan burgess to 
the Election Board of Registrars seconded by Selectman Forman. 



Selectmen's Time: 

Selectman Forman spoke to the Board and commented on how fast his tenure of three years had 
passed and thanked each of them for their support and expressed that they each would be 
missed. Selectman Forman reflected on his experience on the Board and commented on how it 
came with personal growth, some difficult times, and an amazing experience. Selectman Forman 
thanked the Town employees for their hard work during these difficult financial times. Selectman 
Forman recognized all the many volunteers we have in the community. 



31 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 
Monday, May 4, 2009 
Excerpts of Approved Minutes 



Attendance: Chairman, Anthony A. Scibelli, Vice Chairman Eric A. Walker, Selectman, Robert E. 
Mazow, Matthew Strauss, Jill G. Sullivan and Town Administrator, Andrew W. Maylor. 

Appointments / Organization Meeting: 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Sullivan to appoint Selectman Walker 
as Chairman to the Board of Selectmen seconded by Selectman Mazow. 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Scibelli to appoint Selectman Sullivan 
as Vice Chairman to the Board of Selectmen seconded by Selectman Mazow. 

Discussion: 

The Board briefly discussed the RFP's for the Town owned buildings. 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Scibelli to approve the RFP's for Town 
Owned properties seconded by Selectman Sullivan. 

Votes of the Board: 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Sullivan to approve executive session 
meeting minutes from April 7, 2009, seconded by Selectman Mazow. 



The Board voted on a motion by Selectman Sullivan to approve a request from the Swampscott 
High Drama Club to place a sandwich board on Town Hall green closest to the corner of 
Elmwood Road next to the sidewalk from Saturday, May 9, 2009 through Sunday, May 17, 2009, 
seconded by Selectman Mazow. 



The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Sullivan to approve the following 
recommendation of the Traffic Committee 

1 . Change the time restriction on Humphrey Street from 7AM to 9AM to 7AM to 6PM. 

2. To install signage at the intersection of Burrill Street and Essex Street stating "Turning 
traffic must yield to pedestrians". 

3. To remove the 2 hour parking signs on Burrill Street at the corner of Paradise Road. 
These signs are within 20 feet of the intersection making it illegal to park there. 

Seconded by Selectman Strauss. 



Appointments: 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Sullivan to appoint Jeff Vaughan as 
Inspector of Animals seconded by Selectman Scibelli. 



32 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

Tuesday, May 19, 2009 
Excerpts of Approved Minutes 

Attendance: Chairman, Eric A. Walker, Vice Chairman , Jill G. Sullivan , Selectman Robert E. 
Mazow, Anthony A. Scibelli, Matthew W. Strauss and Town Administrator, Andrew W. Maylor. 

Open Session & Discussion: 

The following topics were discussed: 

> Swampscott Drug, Alcohol and Youth Risk Behavior Task Force / Alice Goldsmith, Matt 
Malone, Buck Harris & Tom Healey. (see votes of the Board). 

> Swampscott Fire Chief, Mike Champion updated the Board on the future purchase of a 
Fire Truck. 

> Strategic Planning Meeting update. 

> Police Station Building Committee appointments were discussed. 
Votes of the Board: 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Sullivan to endorse and support the 
formation of the Swampscott Drug, Alcohol & Youth Behavior Task Force and that a member of 
the Board of Selectmen be appointed to that committee, seconded by Selectman Strauss. 



The Board voted 4-0 in favor on a motion by Selectman Scibelli to approve the request from the 
Swampscott Yacht Club for an Entertainment License with the hours of operation from Sunday to 
Thursday until 10pm, Friday & Saturday until midnight and the license is issued for indoor use 
only, seconded by Selectman Mazow. 

Selectman Walker recused himself from the vote & discussion. 



The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Sullivan to approve a request from Five 
Guy Burgers, 980 Paradise Road, Swampscott, Mass for common victualler's license, seconded 
by Selectman Mazow. 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Strauss to approve a request from the 
Swampscott League of Women Voters to hold their annual meeting at Town Hall which includes a 
request to have a one day liquor license for a cocktail party to be held outside on the patio , 
seconded by Selectman Mazow. 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Mazow to approve a request to use 
Town Hall lawn green area for Registration / Short walk for the 2"'^ Annual Community Walk for 
Respect to be held on Sunday, June 14, 2009 , seconded by Selectman Sullivan. 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 
Tuesday, June 9, 2009 
Excerpts of Approved Minutes 



Attendance: Chairman, Eric A. Walker , Vice Chairman , Jill G. Sullivan, Selectmen Robert E. 
Mazow, Anthony A. Scibelli, Matthew W. Strauss, and Town Administrator, Andrew W. Maylor. 



33 



Open Session / Discussion : 

The Preservation Awards were presented by nnembers of the Historical Commission. 
Acknowledgement: 

Chairman, Eric A. Walker read aloud a letter of acknowledgment from the Board of Selectmen to 
Lieutenant Jamie Peter Litcofsky Segaloff. 

Votes of the Board: 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Sullivan to approve the FY09 Budget 
Transfers seconded by Selectman iVlazow. 



Appointments: 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Strauss to appoint Jill Sullivan to the 
Swampscott Drug, Alcohol & Youth Risk Behavior Task Force seconded by Selectman Mazow. 



The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Sullivan to re-appoint the remunerated 
positions from July 1, 2009 through June 30, 2010, seconded by Selectman Mazow. 



The Board voted 4-1 in favor of the re-appoint of the Police Specials from July 1, 2009 through 
June 30, 2010, on a motion by Selectman Sullivan and seconded by Selectman Mazow. 
Selectman Scibelli opposed the motion. 



The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Sullivan to appoint Police Chief Ron 
Madigan, Gail Rosenberg, Tom Groom, Gary Cohen, Phil Merkle, Joe Markarian to the Police 
Station Building Committee and Selectman Robert Mazow was voted as a 

Nonvoting member of the same committee seconded by Selectman Strauss. 



Town Administrator's Report: 

Andrew Maylor, Town Administrator spoke on the following: 

> Relocation of the Retirement office to the Town Hall. 

> Relocation of the Veterans Department to the Senior Center. 

> Working with the School Department to remove a structure behind the Machon School, 

> Boat ramp closure. 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 
Tuesday, June 23, 2009 
Excerpts of Approved iVIinutes 

Attendance: Chairman, Eric A. Walker, Vice Chairman, Jill G. Sullivan , Selectmen Robert A. 
Mazow, Matthew W. Strauss, and Town Administrator, Andrew W. Maylor. 

Open Session / Discussion: 

Swampscott Fire Chief, Michael Champion updated the Board on the purchase of a fire truck. 
(See votes of the Board) 

Public Hearing: 



34 



The Board voted on a motion by Selectman Sullivan to open the public hearing on a request from 
Aggregate Industries -Northeast Region, Inc application for Earth Removal Permit for July 1, 
2009 through June 30, 2010, seconded by Selectman Mazow. 

The Board was given updates from ERAC and Attorney Chris Drucas representing Aggregate 
Industries. 

The Board opened the floor to the public for any comments or questions. No one commented. 

The Board voted on a motion by Selectman Sullivan to close the Public Hearing seconded by 
Selectman Mazow. 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Sullivan to approve the Aggregate 
Industries-Northeast Region Earth Removal Permit for July 1, 2009 through June 30, 2010 as 
recommended by ERAC seconded by Selectman Mazow. 

Votes of the Board: 

The Board voted on a motion by Selectman Strauss to purchase a new fire truck for the Town of 
Swampscott from Hilton Head, South Carolina seconded by Selectman Mazow. 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Mazow to approve a request from the 
SPOT Dog Park Committee to hold "Bark in the Park event to take place on Sunday, August 2, 
2009, from 2-5PM at Phillips Park, seconded by Selectman Sullivan. 

The Board voted on a unanimously on a motion by Selectman Mazow to approve a request from 
SPOT Dog Park Committee to have a table at the Strawberry Festival on June 28, 2009, to 
accept donations, distribute candy , selling of such items as t-shirts, decals etc, seconded by 
Selectman Sullivan. 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Mazow to approve a request from Amy 
DesChenes of "Paint the Moon Blue" to have a face painting table during the Strawberry Festival 
to be held on June 28, 2009 from 4-6P.M, seconded by Selectman Strauss. 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Sullivan to accept a donation for the 
Swampscott Library in the amount of $2,000.00 for the calendar year 2007 and $2,000.00 for the 
calendar year 2008 from the 'William G. & Dorothy C. Bithell Trust", seconded by Selectman 
Strauss. 

Appointments: 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Sullivan to appoint the annual re- 
appointments to Board and Committees, seconded by Selectman Mazow. (See attached list) 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Sullivan to appoint the annual re- 
appointments to remunerated positions, seconded by Selectman Strauss. 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Sullivan to appoint Michael Champion 
to acting Fire Chief through August 31, 2009, seconded by Selectman Strauss. 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Sullivan to appoint Kevin Breen to 
acting Deputy through August 31, 2009, seconded by Selectman Strauss. 

Town Administrator's Report: 

Andrew W. Maylor, Town Administrator spoke on the following: 

> 4'^ of July fundraising efforts. 

> State Budget update. 

> Senior Center / Grant to purchase new van. 



35 



> RFP/ Roadway Improvements update. 

> Walker Road / traffic & road way concerns / one way. 

Selectmen's Time: 

Selectman Mazow informed the community that the Recreation Department would be sponsoring 
some upcoming events to a Red Sox Game and any interested parties should contact the 
Recreation Department for more information. 



Selectman Walker reminded the community of the upcoming events such as the Town Parade, 
Fireworks and the Strawberry Festival. 



Selectman Sullivan informed the community that the RFP's for the former Middle School, Temple 
property and the Phillips Avenue Fire Station are now available at the Town Hall in the Board of 
Selectmen's office. 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 
Monday, June 29, 2009 
Excerpts from Approved Minutes 



Attendance: Chairman, Eric A. Walker, Vice Chairman, Jill G. Sullivan, Selectman Robert A. 
Mazow, Matthew W. Strauss and Anthony A. Scibelli. 

Votes of the Board: 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Sullivan to approve the Lynn Dispatch 
Agreement seconded by Selectman Strauss. 



The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Scibelli to approve Chief of Police, 
Ronald Madigans's contract extension through June 30, 2012 seconded by Selectman Mazow, 



The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Sullivan to approve an application from 
Pyramid Novelties to sell toys, glow sticks to be used during the 4'^ of July festivities seconded 
Selectman Strauss. 



The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Sullivan for a vendor permit for Tony 
T's Meatball, LLC to sell sandwiches, soda & chips to be used during the 4*^ of July festivities 
pending approval of the Health Department seconded by Selectman Scibelli. 



36 



TOWN ACCOUNTANT'S REPORT 



For the Fiscal Year Ending 2009 the Town of Swampscott had to comply with Governmental 
Accounting Standards Boards Statement 34 for fixed assets. The Town had an inventory done in 
June 2002 for all assets valued over $1 ,000 with the Town's threshold for GASB34 being $25,000. 
We were also required to operate Enterprise Funds for Water and Sewer. The Funds are now 
known as Proprietary Funds. 

The following is the Fiscal Year 2009-year end DRAFT Governmental Funds Balance Sheet, 
DRAFT Statement of Revenues, Expenditures and Changes in Fund Balances for Governmental 
Funds, DRAFT Statement of Revenues, Expenditures and Changes in Fund Balance (Budget and 
Actual) Governmental Funds, DRAFT Statement of Net Assets for Governmental Funds, DRAFT 
Statement of Net Assets for Proprietary Funds, DRAFT Statement of Revenue, Expenses and 
Changes in Net Assets for Proprietary Funds, DRAFT Statement of Fiduciary Net Assets and 
DRAFT Statement of Changes in Fiduciary Net Assets and the July 1 . 2009 Free Cash Letter from 
the Department of Revenue. 



Respectfully Submitted, 

David Castellarin 
Town Accountant 



37 



GOVERNMENTAL FUNDS 
BALANCE SHEET 



)UNE 30, 2009 



ASSETS 

Cash and cash equiva)enls $ 

Receivables, net of allowance for uncoUecdble amounts: 

ReaJ estate and personal property taxes 

Taut liens 

Motor vehicle and other excise taxes 

Departmental and other 

Intergovernmental 

Due from other funds 

Restricted assets: 

Cash and cash equivalents 



General 



Stabilization Capital Articles 



3,450,217 $ 



59S,291 S 



I. 3%. 



1,203,245 
486,980 
148,455 

37,133 ^^=';ss^"^'-^" 
316,27d ^ 



TOTAL ASSETS $ S,M2S^„ $2 

UABIUTIES AND FUND BALANCES } 

UABILITIES; % "' ' \ 

Warrants payable %,._% .49^889 S 

Accrued payroll '% 190,707 

Tax refunds payable f^pS!-.!.- % 116,648 

Other liabiliHes \ 585,139 

Deferred revenue Sj.-.-.si?' "■^1,193,450 

Due to other funds ij,.. 

Accrued short-term interest 217,345 

Short-term notes payable VTf^vs'. . .... • 



598,291 $ 



TOTAL LIABIUTIES.. 



FUND BALANCES: "'k 
Reserved for: _^ 
EncumbrarKes and continuing approprifiudiBis... 

Perpetual permanent funds .^.?...>f....i';?. 

Other specific purposes ^ 

Unreserved: .^otuj.. 

Designated for subsequeiit^^ear's ^cpendiruxes 

Undesignated, reportedj|n; % 

General fund ./. 

Special revenue funds ^a^fi^ 

Capital projects funds ?. 

Permanent funds 



2302,178 
618^71 

350,000 
1,871,857 



TOTAL FUND BALANCES- 



TOTAL LIABILITIES AND FUND BALANCES $ 5,642,306 



598,291 



1,1-15,554 



116,048 



New High School 
$ - $ 



1,022,679 



Nonmajor Total 
Governmental Governnn 
Funds Funds 



1,145,554 $ 



116,048 $ 



1,029,506 



1,022,679 $ 



1,022,679 
316,276 

669,654 



2,008,609 



(985,930) 



1,789,886 $ 



116,539 



564,998 



5,838 

1,202 
48« 
14J 
35 

1,1 3< 
31< 

1,71( 



2,471,423 $ 



10,88( 



62,003 $ 
7,290 



67( 
19; 

ii( 

58J 
2,211 
31( 

2i; 

66' 



69,293 



908,08y'' 90i 



489,607 



75,392 



351 

1,87 
1,52 
4 

7. 



2,840,128 


598,291 


1,029,506 


(985,930) 


2,402,130 


5,88 


i 5,642,306 $ 


598,291 $ 


1,145,554 $ 


1,022,679 $ 


2,471423 $ 


10,881 



See notes to basic financial statements. 



Town ofSwampscott, Massachusetts 



Basic Financial Statements 



38 



I 



GOVERNMENTAL FUNDS 
STATEMENT OF REVENUES, EXPENDITURES AND CHANGES IN FUND BALANCES 



FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 2009 



General 



Stabilization 



UES 

estate and personal property taxes. . 

>r vehicle and other excise taxes 

jens 

nents in lieu of taxes 

ges for services 

goveminenlal 

Ides and interest on taxes 

ises and permits 

> and forfeitures 

irtmental and other 

ributions 

itment income 



TOTAL REVENUES.. 



$ 38,734,604 $ 
1,864,938 
9342 
8,075 

8,866,086?5='-PSjc%;"^' ; 
363,36?^ '■%_ / 
1^6,10]% % 
8'Si.638 

l,609,fe 



jrruRES 

ent; 

leneral govemment 

ublic safety 

ducation 

ublic works .i. 

lealth and human services 

ultureand recreation j' .l^.t, 

ension benefits .: 

mployee benefits 

roperty and liability insurance ^i-.Sf 

and county charges 5„..,.^r.':f; 

service: 

rincipal 

"'f"'r%/" 

is, i 



iterest 

TOTAL EXPENDITURES.. 



(DEFICIENCY) OF RE^jKl&^t '"f 
R EXPENDITURES. ...d 



HNANaNG SOURCES (l3§|S]f 

sfers in ? 

;eds of bonds and notes 

ium from issuance of bonds and notes. . 
sfers out 



TOTAL OTHER FINANCING SOURCES (USES). 

:ANGE in FUND BALANCES 

ALANCES AT BEGINNTNG OF YEAR 



1,712,407 
6,107,160 
23,691,147 
1,089,142 
1,176,687 
598,637 
7,232,74* 
4,710,9% 
275,577 
975,144 

3,324,845 
1,740,333 

50,634,823 



990,930 



750,000 

115,787 
(1,077,132) 

(211,345) 

779,585 

2,060,543 



12,999 



12,999 



70,000 



70,000 



82,999 

515,292 



ALANCES AT END OF YEAR S 2,840,128 



598,291 $ 







Noninajor 


Total 






Govemmenlal 


Governmental 


Ospitckl Articles 


New School 


Funds 


Funds 


- $ 


- 5 


- * 


38,734,604 








1,864,938 








9y342 








8,075 






1/1 B/, 341; 










I 1, jy I/Ol^ 








163,367 
































43,999 






16,138 


125,967 


250 000 


18,200 


4 319 413 




7/113 


- 


79^2 


1,799,362 


432,643 




424,037 


6,963,840 


832,123 


196,555 


3,180,011 


25,899,836 ; 


286,797 


- 


46.025 


1,421,964 ' 


1,223 




48,981 


1,226,891 


^IC 'ill 






835^644'^ 
























■•"i;^ 275 377 


- 


- 


- 


., 975>144 










- 


- 


- 


''§^24,845 








/%Hfe.l,740,J33 


























(1,345,532) 


(178,355) 


A 339,143ia 


(180,815) 
















820,000 


1,283,743 


7,047,346 




8331,089 








115,787 






(33,407) 


(1,108339) 


1,283,743 


7,047,346 


(31.407) 


8,158337 


(61,789) 


6,868,991 


307,736 


7,977322 


1,091,295 


(7,854,921) 


2,094394 


(2,093397) 


; 1,029,506 $ 


(985,930) $ 


2,402,130 $ 


5,884,125 



s to basic financial statements. 



Town of Swatnpscott, Massachusetts 



Basic Financial Statements 



39 



GENEUAtTlWD 

SCHEDULE OF REVENUES, EXPENDnXTRES AND CHANGES IN FUND BALANCE 
BUDGET AND ACTUAL 

FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE iO. 2009 



REVENUES 

Real estateand personal property faxes....- $ 

Motor vehicle and other excise taxes 

Tax and utility liens 

Payments in lieu of taxes 

Intergovernmental „ 

Penalties and interest on taxes 

Licenses and permits 

Fines arKl forfeitures - 

Departmental and other 

Investment income 

TOTAL REVENUES 



Prior Year 
EiKumbrances 
and Continuing 
Appropriations 



EXPENDITURES 

Current r" 

Genera) govenunent ^ 

Public safety .-. * 

Hducatton "r^^ 

Public works 

hleaith and human services -^''^fti ' 

Culture and recreation ii; .vi 



909,679 
U697 



Pension benefits 

Employee benefits 

Property and Liability Insurance 

State and county charges 

Debt service: 

Principal 

Interest 

TOTAL EXPENDITURES 

EXCESS CDEflCIENCY) OF REVENUES 

OVER EXPENDITURES 

OTHER FINANCING SOURCES tupSfejSif^^fe, ,i 

Transfers in !5s* ....y. 

Premium from issuance of bonjis and nolesS 

Transfers out .,g 

TOTAL OTHER FINANQNG SOTRCES (USES). . 

NET CHANGE IN FUTvTO BALANCE 



FUND BALANCE AT BEGINNING OF YEAR 

FUNDBAI-ANCE ATEMDOFYEAR. S 



Original 
BudRet 

38,445,729 S 
1,675,000 

%5 ] 

'6J6O,006%. 

'5^000 ^■ 
lsogS^" 

% 165,000 
47]369.559 



1,75Z233 
5,987,662 
22,490,885 

876,029 
1,206,302 

594,766 
3,063,309 
4,985,000 

285,000 

91L736 



Supplemental 






Encumbrances 


Encumbrances 


V; 


Appropriatsons 


Final 




and Continuing 


and Continuing 


Po 


and Transfers 


Budget 


Actual 


Appropriations 


Appcopriations 


(Nl 


10,805 $ 


38,457,534 


$ 38,328,141 


$ 


$ 38,328.141 


$ 




1,875,000 


1,864,938 




1,864,938 






. 


9,342 




9.342 






8,075 


8,075 




8,075 




1 (426,105) 


4,478,525 


4,633,535 




4,633.335 






125,000 


163,367 




163367 






160,000 


186,101 




166,101 






85,000 


86,638 




86,638 






1,600,125 


1,641,715 




1,641.715 






165.000 


96,830 




96,830 




(415,300) 


46,954,259 


47,018,682 




47,018,682 




(32,972) 


1428,940 


1,802,909 


16,164 


1,819,073 




108,710 


6,110,906 


5,997,586 


45,388 


6/142,974 




(94,193) 


22,549,937 


21,649,155 


515,501 


22,164,656 




219,635 


1,108.361 


1,070,781 


36,418 


L107.199 




1,115 


1,207,417 


1.173,968 




1,173,968 




4,815 


599,581 


593,356 


130O 


595,656 




(63,110) 


3,000,198 


3,000,197 




3,000,197 




24,700 


5,009,700 


4,710,996 


2.500 


4,713,496 




(15,000) 


270,000 


275.577 




275,577 






911,736 


975.144 




975,144 







3,682,428 
1,67Z077 


(569,000) 


3,113,428 
1,672,077 


3324345 
1,747,909 




3324,ilJ5 .'i^.. 
1,747,909 


290,155 


47.507,427 


(415,300) 


47382,281 


45322,423 


618.271 


45.940,694^^,, 


(290,155) 


(137,868) 




(428,022) 


696,259 


(618,271) 


4.5S^ii.V. 

.fe. 77,9.88 i*' 




750,000 
(1,077,132) 




750,000 
(1,077,132) 


750,000 
115,787 
(1,077,132) 


A 


•' '' '^-^ „ 

% T^boo 

1 115,787 
|i,077.132) 




(327,132) 




(327,132) 


(211345) 




(211.345) 


(290,155) 


(465,000) 




(755,154) 


484,914 


(618,271) 


(133.337) 


2,197,550 


2,197350 


Z197350 


2,197350 


2.197350 


1197350 


Z197350 


i 1,907395 $ 


1,73Z550 $ 


Z197,5S0 $ 


1,442396 $ 


2,682,464 $ 


1379,279 $ 


2,054,193 $ 



See notes to required supplementary infoimation. 



Toitm o/Swampscottr Massachusetts 



40 



'Required Supplementary Information 



STATEMENT OF NET ASSETS 



JUNE 30, 2009 



Primary Government 


r^n\jtn 1 II 1 lon^sl 

Activities 


Activities 


Total 


5,838,394 $ 
1,710,552 


1,630,458 $ 
346,485 


7,468,852 
i057,037 


1,203,245 
486,980 
148,455 if 

37,13f 
l,139,218ii. 


145,101 

F%),297 
'■^iif^ 632,057 

'^4 439,567 


1,203,245 
632,081 
] 48,455 
800,297 
632,057 
37,133 

1 C*70 "TOR 


10,883353 


tirip- 3,993,965 


14,874,218 


'-'^ ' % 

. "S:i,.4,27S;?27 


518,288 
252,182 
19,567,285 


518,288 
4,531.109 
89,098,362 


13,810,004 


20,337,755 


94.147,759 


84,690,257 


24,331,720 


109,021,977 



ASSETS 
Current assets: 

Cash and cash equivaleitts $ 

Restricted cash and cash equivalents 

Receivables, net of allowance for uncoUecKWe amounts; 

Real estate and persona! property taxes 

Tax and utility liens 

Motor vehicle and other excise taxes 

Water 

Sewer 

Departmental and other 

Intergovernmental 



Total current assets.. 



Noncurrent assets: 

Receivables, ret of allowance for uncollectible amounts: 

Intergovernmental 

Capital assets not being depredated 

Capital assets, net of accumulated depredation 



Total noncxurent assets 



Total assets.. 



LIABILITIES ll'^l 
Current iiabilicies: % \ 

Warrants payable .j ". 

Accrued payroll ^Si-., 

Tax refunds payable 

Other liabilities "^^k"-'- 

Due to other funds c.-. 

Accrued interest 

Workers' compensation clain^ ':. 

Compensated absences ^SS^fi. 

Short-term roles payable , 

Long-term bonds and notes payable •^•.n'ti: y?ii'- 



Total current liabilities.. 



Noncurrtnt liabilities 

Workers' compensation claisfST' 
Net OPEB obligation 



-;r^.,......Sig 



Compensated absencesi%j. 

Long-term bonds and noteS'jp&yable..i5.. 

Total noncurrent liabilities.T 



Total liabilities 

NET ASSETS 

Invested in capital assets, net of related debt. . 
Restricted for: 

Permanent funds: 

Expendable 

Nonexpendable 

Other specific purposes 

Unrestricted 



Total net assets $ 



676,939 


24,561 


701,500 


197,997 


10,457 


208,454 


116,648 




116,648 


585,139 




585,139 


316,276 




316,276 


601,529 


145,698 


747,227 


134,165 




134,165 


194,576 


743 


195319 


569,654 




669,654 


3,311,480 


2,020,235 


5,331,715 


6,804,403 


2,201,694 


9,006,097 


1,207,486 




1,207,486 


2,367,681 


39,406 


2,407,087 


1,751,184 


6,685 


1,757,869 


37,46^666 


8,589,048 


46,051,714 


42,789,017 


8,635,139 


51.424,156 


49,593,420 


10,836,833 


60,430,253 


34,534/436 


10,172,214 


44,706,650 


75,392 




75J92 


489,607 




489,607 


908,086 




908,086 


(910,684) 


3,322,673 


2,411,989 


; 35,096,837 $ 


13,494,887 $ 


48,591,724 



See notes to basic financial statements. 



Town o/Swampscott, Massachusetts 



Baste Financial Statements 



41 



PROPRIETARY FUNDS 
STATEMENT OF NET ASSETS 



JUNE 30, 2009 





Business-Type Activities - Enterprise Funds 


ASSETS 


Water 


Sewer 


Total 


Current assets: 










$ 1,117,121 $ 


513,337 


$ 1,630,458 




163,618 


182,867 


346,485 


Receivables, net of aUowance for uncoUectible amounts: 


a 


5. 






800,29fei=,._i 




800,297 




f""'%vr 


i 632,057 


632,057 




9;2,265 "%, 


- 52,836 


145,101 






439,567 


439,567 






1,820,664 


3,993,965 


Noncurrent assets: 








Receivables, net of allowance for uncollectible amounts: 


■^i. . % 






Intergoveminental 




518,288 


518,288 




"J « 


249,640 


252,182 




;'- " ! 5 ''46 945 








sit ,3- 


15,088,268 


20,337,755 






16,908,932 


24,331,720 


LIABILITIES 








Current liabilities: •? 












24,561 


24,561 




r:! 6,087 


4,370 


10,457 


Accrued interest St.. ^.tsS , 


11,858 


133^ 


145,698 


Compensated absenc>js Ti^r-..^.... Vi^x.,.^. 


669 


74 


743 






1,306,857 


2,020,235 


Total current liabilities #.T.7s^^^y.'f. , 


731,992 


1,469,702 


2,201,694 


Noncurrent liabilities: ^^.l -sr-v 








Net OPEB obligation 


22^91 


16,715 


39,406 






663 


6,685 


Long-term bonds and no^fiS^payable '5 




5,295,787 


8,589,048 






5,313,165 


8,635,139 


Total liabilities 




6,782,867 


10,836,833 


NET ASSETS 










; 1,406,466 


8,765,748 


10,172,214 






1,360,317 


3,322,673 






10,126,065 


$ 13,494,887 



See notes to basic financial statements. 



ToumofSwampscott, Massachusetts Basic Financial Statements 



42 



PROPRIETARY FUNDS 
STATEMENT OF REVENUES, EXPENSES AND CHANGES IN NET ASSETS 



FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 2009 







Business-Type 


: Activities - Enterp: 


rise Funds 






Water 


Sewer 


1 otai 


OPERATING REVENUES 












$ 


2,925,241 $, 


2,041,547 $ 


4,966,788 






41,205 


24,542 


65,747 


TOTAL OPERATING REVENUES 






2,166,089 


5,032,535 


OPERATING EXPENSES 




•if, '*"T_, 










684-961 


879,258 


1,564,219 






l,311,5a7 




1,311,537 






-h 


720,011 


720,011 








523,908 


736,501 






''•%fea^69l 


16,715 


39,406 


TOTAL OPERATING EXPENSES 




i!,231,782 

..^^ 


2,139,892 


4,371,674 






734,664 


(73,803) 


660,861 


NONOPERATING REVENUES (EXPENSES) 1 \ 














25 


249,380 


249,405 






(60,244) 


(343,765) 


(404,009) 


TOTAL NONOPERATING REVENUES (EXPENSES), NET 




(60,219) 


(94,385) 


(154,604) 


INCOME (LOSS) BEFORE TRANSFERC..j;.?%i-.A 




674,445 


(168,188) 


506,257 


TRANSFERS 














31,407 


1,007,132 


1,038,539 


Transfers out Mi--. A™ 




(375,000) 


(375,000) 


(750,000) 


TOTAL TRANSFERS...^^; ^?i^lu,!!?vfe 




(343,593) 


632,132 


288,539 


CHANGE IN NET ASSETSC'^,. j. 




330,852 


463,944 


794,796 


NET ASSETS AT BEGINNING OF ^AR 




3,037,970 


9,662,121 


12,700,091 


NET ASSETS AT END OF YEAR 


$ 


3,368,822 $ 


10,126,065 $ 


13,494,887 



See notes to basic financial statements. 



Town of Szoampscott, Massachusetts Basic Financial Statements 



43 



•FTOUaARY FUNDS 
STATEMENT OF FIDUQARY NET ASSETS 



JUNE 30, 2009 



Pension Private 
Trust Fund Purpose Agency 

ASSETS (As of 12/31/08) Trust Funds Funds 

Cash and cash equivalents $ 1,585,965 $ 301,400 $ 173,968 

Investments 23,524,017 

Interest and dividends 157 / 

Receivables, net of allowance for uncollectible amounts: ^ "^i^-if \ 

Departmental and other 86,468" ' 

Total assets 



LIABILITIES 

Warrants payable 

Liabilities due depositors. 

Total liabilities 

NET ASSETS 



See notes to basic financial statements. 









25,19S>60/'%^.. J 


301,400 


173,968 


;"*''-%39,107*, 






%. 




173,968 


i F% 129^107 




173,968 


'oil 

$\ 25,067,500 $ 


301,400 $ 





TowK of Swampscott, Massachusetts 



44 



Bffstc Financial Statements 



FIDUCIARY FUNDS 

STATEMENT OF CHANGES IN FIDUCIARY NET ASSETS 

FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 2009 



Pension Private 

Trust Fund Purpose 

(As ofl2/31/08) Trust Funds 

ADDITIONS 



Contributions: 


i 3^8,416 $ 


- 

4,337 




'i QQ1 ^ 74 




■ if. 

Net in vesbnent income: f,^ '^^s, 
Net appreciation/ (depreciation) in fair value of investmentej^.."Sr;|j^ 1 
In terest I'. . . ^loSj^T*"''"'^-' 


> (7,826,812) 
264,128 


5,039 


'is 


(7,562,684) 


5,039 


Less in ves tmen t expense .f:TTr\s.v! • 


fn-} Q OCT* 




Net investment income (loss) ij^i?!..... 


^/,/o^,u'*iJ 






64,428 




nr 'i^., 

I lanbrcTS irum ouici ^ybicnio ; .>^,^. . . , 






TOTAL ADDITIONS fm^. 


(3,648,329) 


9,376 


DEDUCTIONS ^ 

Administration i . '. fy^^J 


228,916 
324,047 


22,501 


TOTAL DEDUCTIONS 


5,001,095 


22,501 


CHANGE IN NET ASSETS 


(8,649,424) 


(13,125) 


NET ASSETS AT BEGINNING OF YEAR 


33,716,924 


314,525 


NET ASSETS AT END OF YEAR $ 


25,067,500 $ 


301,400 



See notes to basic financial statements. 



Toum of Swampscott, Massachusetts Basic Financia I Statements 



45 



Massachusetts Department of Revenue Division of Local Services 
Navjeet K Bal, Commissioner 

Robert G. Nunes, Deputy Commissioner & Director of fi/lunicipal Affairs 



Tuesday, March 9, 2010 



David Castellarin 

Accountant 

Town of Swampscott 



Re: NOTIFICATION OF FREE CASH APPROVAL - Swampscott 

Based upon the unaudited balance sheet subnnitted, I hereby certify that the amount 
of available funds or "free cash" as of July 1, 2009 for the Town of Swampscott is: 



General Fund $ 924,145 

Water Enterprise $1,214,309 
Sewer Enterprise $ 515,145 

This certification is in accordance with the provisions of G. L Chapter 59, §23, as 
amended. 

Certification letters will be e-mailed to the mayor/manager, board of selectmen, 
prudential committee, finance director, treasurer, assessor and clerk immediately 
upon approval, provided an e-mail address is reported in DLS' Local Officials 
Directory. Please forward to other officials that you deem appropriate. 



Sincerely, 




Anthony A. Rassias 
Deputy Director of Accounts 



46 



BOARD OF ASSESSORS 



Wiliiam Sullivan, III, Chairman Pamela R. Hogan, Clerk 

Nell G. Sheehan, Member Diane Folan, Clerk 

Linda L. Paster, Secretary 

Donna Champagne O'Keefe, Esq., M.A.A., Assistant Assessor 

In accordance with Article 4 Section 2 of the by-laws of the Town of Swampscott, the Board of 
Assessors herewith submits its annual report to the citizens of the Town of Swampscott for the Fiscal 
Year 2009. 

In Fiscal 2009, residential and commercial real estate values were adjusted based on market 
indications. Overall, residential real estate assessments decreased by 1.8% for Fiscal 2009 while 
commercial assessments increased by 5.05%. 

The Department of Revenue requires all real estate to reflect 100% of full and fair cash value 
every year. The Department of Revenue certifies compliance with the statute every three years. In 
• Fiscal Year 2009, the Assessing Department conducted an interim year reassessment analysis and 
received approval from the Department of Revenue. 

The town is required to physically measure and inspect all real estate within the community every 
ten years. Toward this end, the Assessors Department will continue conducting permit reviews and 
cyclical Inspections. Since the accuracy of data Is directly related to assessing the value of real and 
personal property equitably, the cooperation of Swampscott residents is strongly encouraged. These 
efforts help to ensure consistent distribution of the tax burden. 

The practice of interim year adjustments between recertificatlon years has allowed the Board to 
maintain fair and defensible values at the Appellate Tax Board. This has resulted in a consistently 
positive overlay reserve that is then released to the surplus account. The total amount released to the 
surplus account by the Board since 1997 is $2,212,500. 

At the town wide election in April, Ms. Linda L. Paster was elected to the Board of Assessors 
(BOA) for a three-year term. Subsequently, at a reorganizational meeting, the BOA voted unanimously to 
elect Ms. Paster as Secretary to the Board; and Mr. Sullivan as Chairman to the Board. 

The senior abatement/exemption work-off program Is now in its 10"" year and continues to benefit 
both the Town and its senior citizens. In Fiscal 2009, twenty-four (24) senior citizens performed voluntary 
work throughout the Town in exchange for an abatement of real estate taxes. The total amount of 
abatements/exemptions issued through the program for Fiscal 2009 was $14,046.00. 

In a joint meeting of the Board of Assessors and Board of Selectmen on November 25, 2008, the 
Board of Selectmen once again voted to maintain a split tax rate. The approved rates for Fiscal 2009 
were $14.34 per thousand for residential property and $26.63 per thousand for commercial, industrial, 
and personal property. 

Statutory personal exemptions/tax deferrals, which are mandatory under Chapter 59 MGL, totaled 
$95,821.28, and were given to 141 qualified homeowners. 



MOTOR VEHICLE EXCISE TAX 

Number of Vehicles 13,245 
Excise Tax Commitment Total $1 ,855,057.44 

BOAT EXCISE 

Number of Vessels 1 58 

Excise Tax Commitment Total $7,139.00 



47 



The Board of Assessors wishes to express its appreciation to iVIr. Andrew IVIaylor, Mr. David 
Castellarin, Ms. Susan Duplin, and Ms. Denise Dembkosl<i for their cooperation and assistance 
throughout the year. 

The Board of Assessors herewith submits its figures used to determine the tax rate for Fiscal 
Year 2009. 

Respectfully, 

William Sullivan, III, Chairman 
Neil G. Sheehan, Member 
Linda L. Paster, Secretary 



48 



THE COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE 
FISCAL 2009 TAX LEVY LIMITATION FOR 
SWAMPSCOTT 
FOR BUDGET PLANNING PURPOSES 



I. TO CALCULATE THE FY2008 LEVY LIMIT 

A. FY2007 Levy Limit _ 
A1 ADD Amended FY2006 Growth _ 

B. ADD ( lA + IA1 ) X 2.5% 

C. ADD FY2008 New Growtli _ 

D. ADD FY2008 Override _ 

E. FY2008 Subtotal 



F. FY2008 Levy Ceiling 



32.133,111 


803,328 

347,997 



33,284,436 

1. 1 $ 33,284.436 
64.504.250 FY2008 Levy Limit 



F. FY2009 Levy Ceiling 



11. TO CALCULATE THE FY2009 LEVY LIMIT 

A. FY2008 Levy Limit from I. 33,284,436 
A1 ADD Amended FY2008 Growth 

B. ADD ( riA + IIA1 ) X 2.5% 832.111 

C. ADD FY2009 New Growth 519.284 

D. ADD FY2009 Override 

E. FY2009 Subtotal 34,635.831 



63,609.098 



IL $ 



34,635.831 



FY2009 Levy Limit 



in. TO CALCULATE THE FY2009 
MAXIMUM ALLOWABLE LEVY 



A. FY2009 Levy Limit from H. 

B. FY2009 Debt Exclusion(s) 



C. FY2009 Capital Expenditure Exclusion(s) 

D. FY2009 Other Adjustment _ 

E. FY2009 Water / Sewer 



F. FY2009 Maximum Allowable Levy 



34,635,831 



4,103,391 



$ 38,739,222 



49 



2/5/2010 9:24 AM 



BUILDING DEPARTMENT - FY 2009 



INSPECTOR OF BUILDINGS: 
ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT: 
LOCAL BUILDING INSPECTOR: 
PLUMBING/GAS INSPECTOR: 
ALTERNATE PLUMBING/GAS INSPECTOR: 
ELECTRICAL INSPECTOR: 
ALTERNATE ELECTRICAL INSPECTOR: 



J. ALAN HEZEKIAH 
LINDA PASTER 
VACANT 

PETER MCCARRISTON 
JEFF WALDMAN 
JIM SAMMS 
JOHN BARNES 



The Building Department interprets and enforces the Massachusetts State Building Code, 
Architectural Access Code, Plumbing and Gas Code, Massachusetts Electrical Code and the 
Town of Swampscott Zoning By-Laws in order to insure the public safety. 

The Department also reviews applications and issues permits, conducts field Inspections 
and responds to the request for information and compliance, maintains property records, assists 
residents, contractors and others, and works with the town departments to help assure 
consistency, accuracy and access to information. 

Although fiscal Year 20089 saw yet another increase in number of permits issued as well 
as inspections performed, the decrease in value and revenue signaled a shift in the local 
economy. The department continues to upgrade general information hand-outs, as well as our 
website, to continually improve our ability to serve the community. 

The following information contains the Building Department activity for the fiscal year 
2009 {July 1, 2008-June 30, 2009). Total number of permits issued, fees collected and estimated 
construction costs are as follows: 

BUILDING DEPARTMENT STATISTICS FOR FY 2009 



Permits & Fees: 


Total # of Permits: 


Total $ of Fees: 


Total Const. Cost: 


Building 


472 


$134,999 


$ 11,363,944.00 


Plumbing 


369 


$15,393 




Gas 


300 


$13,575 




Wiring 


331 


$17,558 




Mechanical 


12 


$700 




Overhanging Sign 


18 


$1350 




Certificate of Insp. 


20 


$800 




Certificate of Occ. 


24 






TOTAL: 


1542 


$184,375 


$ 11,363,944.00 



Respectfully, 



J. Alan Hezekiah 
Inspector of Buildings 



50 



TOWN CLERK 



SUSAN J. DUPLIN 
CLERK 



OFFICIAL TOWN OF SWAMPSCOTT STATISTICS - 2009 



Zoning Board of Appeals filings: 44 

Site Plan Review Applications: 17 

Resignations of Town Officials: 10 

Certificates of Business (DBA) issued: 105 

Gas Storage (Flammables) Registrations: 14 

Dog Licenses issued: 1022 



2009 2008 2007 

Births Recorded: 123 154 145 

Deaths Recorded: 154 177 145 

Marriages Recorded: 45 47 47 



BOARD OF REGISTRARS 

Susan J. Duplin 
Sue Burgess 
Paul Debole 
Margaret Somer 



NOTE: 

By vote of Town Meeting, the annual report of all municipal departments now covers the fiscal year, July 1 
to June 30. Since many local, state and federal agencies require statistics for birth, death and marriages to 
be on a calendar year basis, January 1 to December 3 1, we herewith present the last three calendar years to 
maintain the historical integrity and usefulness of this report. 



51 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 
WILLIAM FRANCIS GALVIN 
SECRETARY OF THE COMMONWEALTH 



SS. 

To either of the Constables of the Town of Swampscott 
GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth, you are hereby required to notify and warn the inhabitants of said town who are 
qualified to vote in Primaries to vote at 



Precinct One 
Precinct Two 
Precinct Three 
Precinct Four 
Precinct Five 
Precinct Six 



Clarke School 
Clarice School 

First Church Congregational 
First Church Congregational 
Swampscott Middle School 
Swampscott Middle School 



Norfolk Avenue 
Norfolk Avenue 
Monument Avenue 
Monument Avenue 
Forest Avenue 
Forest Avenue 



on TUESDAY, THE SIXTEENTH DAY OF SEPTEMBER, 2008, from 7:00 A.M. to 8:00 P.M. for the following 
purpose: 

To cast their votes in the State Primary for the candidates of political parties for the following offices: 



SENATOR IN CONGRESS 

REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS. . . . . 

COUNCILLOR 

SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT 

REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT, 
REGISTER OF PROBATE 



. . . . FOR THE COMMONWEALTH 

6TH DISTRICT 

5™ DISTRICT 

3^ ESSEX & MIDDLESEX DISTRICT 

8™ ESSEX DISTRICT 

ESSEX COUNTY 



Hereof fail not and make return of this warrant with your doings thereon at the time and place of said voting. 




, 2008. 



52 



51 Al t: KKimAKT 



Democratic r 














1 ijldi 


SENATOR IN CONGRESS 
















BLANKS 1 


n 


1 


1 


't 


£. 


A 
U 


Q 
O 


JOHN F. KERRY 




1 97 


1fifl 

1 DO 


1 Q4 

1 ^H 




1 74 

1 i H 


1(11(1 


EDWARD J. O'REILLY 




fid 


10 


ftO 


fin 


^9 




All Others 




n 








u 


n 

u 




n 


TOTAL 




252 


192 


241 


97R 


218 


226 


1407 


Democratic 
















REP. IN CONGRESS 
















Blanks 




37 


37 




S4 




4S 


245 


JOHN F. TIERNEY 


£. 1 ^ 


1S'^ 






1fi9 


1ft1 

1 U 1 




All Others 









id 


n 


n 
u 


n 


7 


TOTAL 




252 


192 


941 


97ft 

^ 1 o 


91ft 


22G 


1407 


Democratic ' ' 
















COUNCILLOR 
















BLANKS 1 


47 




^^9 




H^ 


fi1 




MARY-ELLEN MANNING 






I^R 


1 uO 


14R 


140 


944 


TIMOTHY P. HOUTEN 


97 






ou 


9*^ 




171 


All Others 




n 


n 


n 














TOTAL 








941 


97R 


91ft 


29f? 


1407 


Democratic 
















SEN. IN GENRAL COURT 
















BLANKS 1 


Hi/ 














THOMAS M. MCGEE 






900 


91Q 


1fi^ 


17*^ 


1 109 


All Others 




2 


2 


2 











6 


TOTAL 




252 


192 


241 


278 


218 


226 


1407 


Democratic^"--*' 
















REP. IN GENERAL COURT 
















BLANKS 1 


49 


43 


40 


54 


40 


43 


269 


LORI A. EHRLICH 


201 


147 


200 


222 


177 


182 


1129 


All Others 




2 


2 


1 


2 


1 


1 


9 


TOTAL 




252 


192 


241 


278 


218 


226 


1407 


Democratic 
















REGISTER OF PROBATE 
















BLANKS 1 


71 


54 


68 


90 


65 


11 


425 


PAMELA CASEY O'BRIEN 


180 


137 


172 


188 


153 


149 


979 


All Others 




1 


1 


1 











3 


TOTAL 




252 


192 


241 


278 


218 


226 


1407 



Registereti Voters 9,969 
1 5% Voter turnout 



53 



STATE PRIMARY 



SEPTEMBER 16, 2008 



SWAMPSCOTT 



Republican 


Precinct 1 


Precinct 2 


Precinct 3 


Precinct 4 


Precinct 5 


Precincts 


Total 


SENATOR IN CONGRESS 
















BLANKS 




3 





1 


2 


1 





7 


JEFFREY 


K. BEATTY 


22 


7 


8 


18 


13 


13 


81 


All Others 

























TOTAL 




25 


7 


9 


20 


14 


13 


88 


Republican 
















REP. IN CONGRESS 
















BLANKS 1 


4 


1 


2 


2 


1 


1 


11 


RICHARD A. BAKER 


21 


6 


7 


18 


13 


12 


77 


All Others 

























TOTAL 




25 


7 


9 


20 


14 


13 


88 


Republican 
















COUNCILLOR 
















BLANKS 




24 


6 


9 


19 


14 


13 


85 


All Others 




1 


1 





1 








3 


TOTAL 




25 


7 


9 


20 


14 


13 


88 


Republican 
















SEN. IN GENERAL COURT 
















BLANKS 




24 


7 


9 


19 


14 


13 


86 


All Others 




1 








1 








2 


TOTAL 




25 


7 


9 


20 


14 


13 


88 


Republican 
















REP. IN GNERAL COURT 
















BLANKS 1 


2 








2 





2 


6 


JOHN BLAISDELL 


23 


7 


9 


18 


14 


11 


82 


All Others 

























TOTAL 




25 


7 


9 


20 


14 


13 


88 


Republican 
















REGISTER OF PROBATE 
















BLANKS 




24 


7 


9 


19 


14 


13 


86 


All Others 




1 








1 








2 


TOTAL 




25 


7 


9 


20 


14 


13 


88 



Registered Voters 9,969 

1 5% Voter turnout Page 2 

54 



SI Al t I-'KIIVIAKT 



OCr I CIVIDCK ID, ZUUO 



ovvMiviroou i I 



Green-Rainbow 


PrPf*inf*t 1 










PrAPirif^t fi 


Total 


SENATOR IN CONGRESS 
















BLANKS 
















n 








All Others 













n 


n 








TOTAL 












V 














Green-Rainbow 
















REP. IN CONGRESS 
















BLANKS 













n 











All Others 

























TOTAL 

























Green-Rainbow 
















COUNCILLOR 
















BLANKS 

























All Others 

























TOTAL 

























Green -Rain bow 
















SEN. IN GENERAL COURT 
















BLANKS 

























All Others 

























TOTAL 

























Green-Rainbow 
















REP. IN GENERAL COURT 
















BLANKS 

























All Others 

























TOTAL 

























Green-Rainbow 
















REGISTER OF PROBATE 
















BLANKS 

























All Others 

























TOTAL 


























Registered Voters 9,969 
15% Voter turnout 



65 



STATE PRIMARY 



SEPTEMBER 16, 2008 



SWAMPSCOTT 



Working Families 


Precinct 1 


Precinct 2 


Precinct 3 


Precinct 4 


Precinct 5 


Precinct 6 


Total 


SENATOR IN CONGRESS 
















BLANKS 

























All Others 

























TOTAL 

























Working Families 
















REP. IN CONGRESS 
















BLANKS 

























All Others 

























TOTAL 

























Working Families 
















COUNCILLOR 
















BLANKS 

























All Others 

























TOTAL 

























Working Families 
















SEN. IN GENERAL COURT 
















BLANKS 

























All Others 

























TOTAL 

























Working Families 
















REP. IN GENERAL COURT 
















BLANKS 

























All Others 

























TOTAL 

























Working Families 
















REGISTER OF PROBATE 
















BLANKS 

























All Others 

























TOTAL 


























Registered Voters 9,969 
15% Voter turnout 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

WILLIAM FRANCIS GALVIN 
SECRETARY OF THE COMMONWEALTH 



SS. 



To either of the Constables of the Town of Swampscott 



GREETING: 



In the name of the Commonwealth, you are hereby required to notify and warn the inhabitants of said town who are 
qualified to vote in the State Election to vote at 



Precinct One 
Precinct Two 
Precinct Three 
Precinct Four 
Precinct Five 
Precinct Six 



Clarke School 
Clarke School 

First Church Congregational 
First Church Congregational 
Swampscott Middle School 
Swampscott Middle School 



Norfolk Avenue 
Norfolk Avenue 
Monument Avenue 
Monument Avenue 
Forest Avenue 
Forest Avenue 



on TUESDAY, THE FOURTH DAY OF NOVEMBER, 2008, from 7:00 A.M. to 8:00 P.M. for the following purpose: 
To cast their votes in the State Election for the candidates for the following offices: 

ELECTORS OF PRESIDENT AND VICE PRESIDENT STATEWIDE 

SENATOR IN CONGRESS FOR THE COMMONWEALTH 

REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS 6TH DISTRICT 

' COUNCILLOR 5TH DISTRICT 

SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT 3^ ESSEX & MIDDLESEX DISTRICT 

REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT 8™ ESSEX DISTRICT 

REGISTER OF PROBATE ESSEX COUNTY 



QUESTION 1: LAW PROPOSED BY INITIATIVE PETITION 

Do you approve of a law summarized below, on which no vote was taken by the Senate or the House of Representatives 
before May 6, 2008? 

SUMMARY 

This proposed law would reduce the state personal income tax rate to 2.65% for all categories of taxable income 
for the tax year beginning on or after January 1 , 2009, and would eliminate the tax for all tax years beginning on or after 
January 1, 2010. 

The personal income tax applies to income received or gain realized by individuals and married couples, by 
estates of deceased persons, by certain trustees and other fiduciaries, by persons who are partners in and receive income 
from partnerships, by corporate trusts, and by persons who receive income as shareholders of "S corporations" as defined 
under federal tax law. The proposed law would not affect the tax due on income or gain realized in a tax year beginning 
before January 1, 2009. 

The proposed law states that if any of its parts were declared invalid, the other parts would stay in effect. 
A YES VOTE would reduce the state personal income tax rate to 2.65% for the tax year beginning on January 1, 2009, 
and would eliminate the tax for all tax years beginning on or after January 1, 2010. 
A NO VOTE would make no change in state income tax laws. 



QUESTION 2: LAW PROPOSED BY INITIATIVE PETITION 

Do you approve of a law summarized below, on which no vote was taken by the Senate or the House of Representatives 
before May 6, 2008? 

SUMMARY 

This proposed law would replace the criminal penalties for possession of one ounce or less of marijuana with a 
new system of civil penalties, to be enforced by issuing citations, and would exclude information regarding this civil 
offense from the state's criminal record information system. Offenders age 1 8 or older would be subject to forfeiture of 
the marijuana plus a civil penalty of $100. Offenders under the age of 18 would be subject to the same forfeiture and, if 
they complete a drug awareness program within one year of the offense, the same $100 penalty. 

1^7 



Offenders under 18 and their parents or legal guardian would be notified of the offense and the option for the 
offender to complete a drug awareness program developed by the state Department of Youth Services. Such programs 
would include ten hours of community service and at least four hours of instruction or group discussion concerning the 
use and abuse of marijuana and other drugs and emphasizing early detection and prevention of substance abuse. 

The penalty for offenders under 1 8 who fail to complete such a program within one year could be increased to as 
much as $ 1 ,000, unless the offender showed an inability to pay, an inability to participate in such a program, or the 
unavailability of such a program. Such an offender's parents could also be held liable for the increased penalty. Failure 
by an offender under 17 to complete such a program could also be a basis for a delinquency proceeding. 

The proposed law would define possession of one ounce or less of marijuana as including possession of one 
ounce or less of tetrahydrocannibinol ("THC"), or having metabolized products of marijuana or THC in one's body. 

Under the proposed law, possessing an ounce or less of marijuana could not be grounds for state or local 
government entities imposing any other penalty, sanction, or disqualification, such as denying student financial aid, public 
housing, public financial assistance including unemployment benefits, the right to operate a motor vehicle, or the 
opportunity to serve as a foster or adoptive parent. The proposed law would allow local ordinances or bylaws that 
prohibit the public use of marijuana, and would not affect existing laws, practices, or policies concerning operating a 
motor vehicle or taking other actions while under the influence of marijuana, unlawfiil possession of prescription forms of 
marijuana, or selling, manufacturing, or trafficking in marijuana. 

The money received from the new civil penalties would go to the city or town where the offense occurred. 
A YES VOTE would replace the criminal penalties for possession of one ounce or less of marijuana with a new system of 
civil penalties. 

A NO VOTE would make no change in state criminal laws concerning possession of marijuana. 

QUESTION 3: LAW PROPOSED BY INITIATIVE PETITION 

Do you approve of a law summarized below, on which no vote was taken by the Senate or the House of Representatives 
before May 6, 2008? 

SUMMARY 

This proposed law would prohibit any dog racing or racing meeting in Massachusetts where any form of betting 
or wagering on the speed or ability of dogs occurs. 

The State Racing Commission would be prohibited from accepting or approving any application or request for 
racing dates for dog racing. 

Any person violating the proposed law could be required to pay a civil penalty of not less than $20,000 to the 
Commission. The penalty would be used for the Commission's administrative purposes, subject to appropriation by the 
state Legislature. All existing parts of the chapter of the state's General Laws conceming dog and horse racing meetings 
would be interpreted as if they did not refer to dogs. 

These changes would take effect January 1, 2010. The proposed law states that if any of its parts were declared 
invalid, the other parts would stay in effect. 

A YES VOTE would prohibit dog races on which betting or wagering occurs, effective January 1, 2010. 
A NO VOTE would make no change in the laws governing dog racing. 



Hereof fail not and make return of this warrant with your doings thereon at the time and place of said voting. 




Constable 



(month arid day) 



58 



2 ^ 

< ii 

2. » 

i o 

O CD 
C 



(0 

m 

m 
r- 
m 
o 

H 

o 

Z 



m 



m 



cn 



m }3 



CD 



O 

M 

2. 

m 
o 

o 

3 
1 

(D 
W 
C 



i 

s 

CO 

o 



59 



li 

o 



i TOTAL 1 


|N0 1 


|YES 1 


IBLANKS 1 


IQUEST10N3 1 




1 TOTAL 1 


|NO 1 


|YES 1 


IBLANKS 1 


IQUESTION 2 1 




[TOTAL 1 


|N0 1 


|YES 1 


IBLANKS 1 


IQUESTION 1 1 




ITOTAL : ■ . m 


|AII others | 


1 PAMELA CASEY O'BRIEN | 


jBLANKS 1 


[REGISTER OF PROBATE | 




[TOTAL m\ 


|AII others | 


[JOHN BLAISDELL | 


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60 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 




Monday, November 10, 2008 
7:00 P.M. 
Swampscott High School 
200 Essex Street 
Swampscott, Massachusetts 

Warrant Report 



61 



The Town of Swampscott 
Town Warrant 
November 2008 



SS. 

To either of the Constables of the Town of Swampscott 
GREETINGS: 



In the name of the Commonwealth, you are hereby required to notify and warn 
the inhabitants of said town that a Special Town Meeting will be held on Monday, 
November 10, 2008, beginning at 7:00 P.M. in the Swampscott High Auditorium located 
at 200 Essex Street, Swampscott. 



62 



2008 SPECIAL TOWN MEETING- November 10, 2008 



Return of Service 

Pursuant to the within waiTant to me directed, I have notified the inhabitants of the Town 
of Swampscott qualified to vote in elections and in town affairs by posting an attested 
copy thereof at the Town Administration Building, at the Post Office, and at least two 
public and conspicuous places in each precinct in the Town, and at or in the immediately 
vicinity of the Swampscott Railroad Station. Said posting was done October 23, 2008, 
and not less than fourteen (14) days before the date appointed for said meeting. 

Attest: Paul Minsky 
Constable of Swampscott 

Mailing of Warrants 

The waiTants for the Special Town Meeting were mailed to the Town Meeting 
Representatives on October 23, 2008. Copies of the warrant were available, free of 
charge, for any interested person at the Town Administration Building. 

NOTICE OF SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 
MONDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 2008, 7:00 P.M. 

To the Town Meeting Members: 

Notice is hereby given in accordance with Article II, Section 2, of the Bylaws of the 
Town of Swampscott that a Special Town Meeting will be held on Monday, November 
10, 2008, beginning at 7:00 p.m. in the Swampscott High School Auditorium located at 
200 Essex Street. 

Moderator Martin C. Goldman, Esquire, will preside. 

Meeting Certifications: 

I hereby certify that in accordance with the adjournment of the Special Town Meeting of 
November 10, 2008 was held in the Swampscott High School auditorium located at 200 
Essex Street and was called to order at 7:15 p.m. with the necessaiy quorum present 
(161). Monday, November 10, 2008 at 10:20 p.m. it was voted to adjourn Special Town 
Meeting. 

Attendance for the 2008 Special Town Meeting, by precinct, list is at the end of this 
report. 

Attest: Susan J. Duplin 
Clerk of Swampscott 



63 



ARTICLE 1. To hear and act on the reports of Town Officials, Boards and 

Committees. 

Sponsored by the Board of Selectmen 

Comment: This routine Article appears every Town Meeting to allow 
Town groups to make reports. 

A report from Jill Sullivan Chairperson of the Town Building Oversight 
Committee. 

A report from Sylvia Belkin of the Historical Commission. 

MOTION made and seconded that the Historical Commission and the Board of 
Selectmen appoint a committee to look into repairs of the chapel at the cemetery and to 
report back at the 2009 Annual Town Meeting. 

Majority Vote. 

11/10/08 STM 

MOTION made and seconded to dissolve the Town Building Study Committee. 
Majority Vote. 
11/10/08 STM 



ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Law, 

as follows, or take any action relative thereto: 

Amend : Article II. Use, Dimensional and Timing Regulations, Section 
2.1.1.0, Establishment of Districts, by adding the following new 
subsections: 



2.1.1.7. Planned Development Districts (PDD) . For the 
purposes of this By-Law, the Town of Swampscott establishes the 
following Planned Development Districts. 



2.1.1.7.1. Phillips Fire Station PDD. 

2.1 .1 .7.2. Burrill Senior Center PDD. 

2.1.1.7.3. Greenwood PDD. 

2.1.1.7.4. Temple PDD. 



Amend: Subsection 2.1 .3.0, second sentence. Official zoning map, to 
provide: Overlay and Planned Development Districts are mapped as set 
forth herein. 



Amend : Use regulations by adding the following new subsection, 
2.2.8.0. Planned Development Districts. For allowed principal and 
accessory uses in a Planned Development District, see Section 4.5.2.0. 



64 



Amend : Dimensional regulations by adding the new subsection, 
2.3.9.5. Planned Development Districts. For dimensional regulations in a 
Planned Development District, see Section 4.5.3.0 and the Table of PDD 
Dimensional Regulations. 

Amend : Article IV. Special Regulations, by adding the following new 
Section 4.5.0.0. 

4.5.0.0. Regulations Pertaining to Planned Development Districts 

(PDD). 

4.5.1.0. Purposes . The purposes of this Section 
4.5.0.0 are to: (1) provide the opportunity for a variety of housing 
types at certain locations in the Town at greater densities and with 
reduced dimensional requirements than would otherwise be 
allowed; (2) expand the possible uses on the land in the districts; 
(3) promote the efficient use of land in the districts; (4) provide the 
opportunity to re-develop land in the districts to benefit the Town 
and the public; (5) provide diversity and variety in housing types; (6) 
promote design and land planning to achieve aesthetic qualities of 
the Town; and (7) encourage development consistent with 
recommendations in the Report of the Town Building Study 
Committee Submitted for Town Meeting, May 5, 2008. 

4.5.1.1. Definition . A planned development is a 
residential plan for the use and development of a parcel of 
land, improved or unimproved, which plan conforms to the 
purposes and provisions of Section 4.5.0.0. and is not 
subject to Section 2.2.3.0 -Table of Principal Uses and 
Section 2.3.2.0 - Table of Dimensional Regulations in 
Appendix A and Illustrations in Appendix B. 

4.5.1.2. Location of Districts . The Planned 
Development Districts are mapped as follows: 

Phillips Fire Station PDD, Assessor's Map 29, Lot 45, 2 
Phillips Avenue; 

Burrill Senior Center PDD, Assessor's Map 1, Lot 23, 89 
Burrill Street; 

Greenwood PDD, Assessor's Map 19, Lot 87, 71 
Greenwood Avenue; 

Temple PDD, Assessor's Map 29, Lots 4 and 3A, 837 
Humphrey Street. 

4.5.2.0. Permitted Principal and Accessorv Uses . Uses 
permitted in the Planned Development Districts. 



65 



4.5.2.1. In the Phillips Fire Station PDD, a single family 
dwelling and an accessory garage or storage space for private 
automobiles are allowed as of right. 

4.5.2.2. In the Burrill Senior Center PDD, a single, two-family, 
or three-family dwelling is allowed as of right. 

4.5.2.3. In the Greenwood PDD, multi-family dwellings and 
an accessory garage or storage area, located under the 
dwellings, for private automobiles are allowed as of right. 

4.5.2.4. In the Temple PDD, multi-family dwellings and an 
accessory garage or storage area, located under the 
dwellings, for private automobiles are allowed as of right. 

4.5.3.0. Dimensional Regulations . The dimensional 
regulations in the following table apply in the Planned Development 
Districts. 

Table of PDD Dimensional Regulations 



Minimum Lot 
Area (sf: square 
feet) 

Minimum Lot 
Frontage 

Front Yard 
Setback 

Rear Yard 
Setback 

Side Yard 
Setbacks 



Maximum Gross 
Floor Area 



Phillips Fire 
Station PDD 



10,442 sf 



120 feet 



30 feet 



35 feet 

1 1 feet 
(west side) 
9 feet (east 
side) 



Not Applicable 



Burrill Senior 
Center PDD 



9,165 sf 
79 feet 
17 feet 
25 feet 
10 feet 



Not Applicable 



Greenwood 
PDD 



96,600 sf 
250 feet 
60 feet 



35 feet 



90,000 sf 



Temple 
PDD 



97,567 sf 
392 feet 

40 feet 

40 feet 
(north side) 

20 feet 
(south side) 

20 feet 
(east side) 

70,000 sf 



66 



Open Space 
Requirement 

Total Lot 
Coverage 

Maximum 
Height * 



Not Applicable 



25 percent 

2 1/2 stories 
up to 35 feet 



Not Applicable 



25 percent 

2 1/2 stories 
up to 35 feet 



35% 



None Required 



60 feet* 



45% 

None 
Required 

45 feet 



67 



Phillips Fire Burrill Senior Greenwood Temple 
Station PDD Center FDD FDD FDD 



Minimum 
Parking 
Spaces per 
Dwelling Unit 

Minimum 
Parking 
Space Size 

Minimum Width 
of Parking Lot 
Circulation 
Lanes 

Maximum 
Number of 

Dwelling Units 

Garage or 
storage space 
for private 
automobiles 

Maximum 
Number of 
Principal 
Structures per 
Lot 



2 spaces 



By-Law 



None Required 



20 feet from 
rear lot line 
feet from 
western lot line 



2 spaces 



None Required 



None Required 



By-Law 



2 spaces 



9ft by 18ft 



20 feet 



41 



None Required 



2 spaces 



9 ft by 18 ft 



By-Law 



42 



None 
Required 



Maximum height is measured to the peak of the finished roof. 
Excluding the existing cupola. 

By-Law means that the provisions of the Swampscott Zoning By-Law 
other than those applicable to a Planned Development District apply. See 
Section 4.5.5.0. 



4.5.4.0. Parcel Subdivision . No parcel of land in a Planned 
Development District may be subdivided. 

4.5.5.0. Zoning Conformance . Unless specifically provided in 
Section 4.5.0.0, all other provisions of the Swampscott Zoning By- 
Law apply to uses and structures in a Planned Development 
District, including, but not limited to, Site Plan Review. 



68 



Amend : The Official Swampscott Zoning Map to provide that the 
following parcels shall be re-zoned to be located in the Planned 
Development Districts: 

Assessor's IVlap 29, Lot 45: Phillips Fire Station Planned Development 
District. 

Assessor's Map 1, Lot 23: Burrill Senior Center Planned Development 
District. 

Assessor's Map 19, Lot 87: Greenwood Planned Development 
District. 

Assessor's Map 29, Lots 4 and 3A: Temple Planned Development 
District. 

Sponsored by the Town Building Oversight Committee 

Comment: The purpose of this Article is to amend the Town's Zoning 
By-Law to allow for the types of reuses recommended by the Town 
Building Oversight Committee for the four buildings that will be sold per 
Articles 3 through 6. 

Article 2 requires 2/3's affirmative vote to adopt 

ARTICLE 2 AMENDMENT MOTION made and seconded that the Town 
vote to amend the Zoning By-Law as printed in the Warrant, except that the 
words "or take any action relative thereto" be deleted and that in Section 4.5.1.0, 
the word "and" be inserted before "(6)" and a period replace the semi-colon 
following the phrase "(6) promote design and land planning to achieve aesthetic 
qualities of the Town" and the remainder of the section beginning "(7)" be 
deleted; and that in Section 4. 5. 3.0. , Table of Dimensional Regulations, the 
"Minimum Parking Space Size" provide "None Required" in the Phillips Fire 
Station PDD and "9 ft by 18 ft" in the Burrill Senior Center PDD. 
Article 2 
Majority Vote. 
11/10/08 STM 

MOTION made and seconded to call the question 
Article 2 

Unanimous Vote. 
11/10/08 STM 

ARTICLE 2 MAIN MOTION WITH VOTED AMENDMENTS made and seconded. 
Article 2 

Unanimous Vote. 
11/10/08 STM 

ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will vote to transfer the care, custody, 
management and control of the land and building formerly known as the Burrill 



69 



street Senior Center and located at 89 Burrill Street, Swampscott, identified on 
the Town's Assessor's maps as: IVlap 1, Lot 23, from the Board of Selectmen for 
the purposes for which such land is currently held to the Board of Selectmen for 
purposes of sale and to authorize the Chief Procurement Officer to sell the parcel 
of land and the building per the provisions of Massachusetts General Law 
Chapter SOB, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Town Building Oversight Committee 

Comment: This Article, which is based on the recommendation of the 
Town Building Oversight Committee, provides the Selectmen and the 
Town Administrator the authority to sell the former Senior Center. The 
Executive Summary of the report of the Town Building Oversight 
Committee can be found in Appendix A. 

The Finance Committee will report on this Article at Town Meeting. 
Article 3 requires 2/3's affirmative vote to adopt 

ARTICLE 3 AMENDMENT MOTION made and seconded that the Town 
vote to transfer the care, custody, management and control of the land and 
building formerly known as the Burrill Street Senior Center and located at 89 
Burrill Street, Swampscott, identified on the Town's Assessor's maps as: Map 1, 
Lot 23, from the Board of Selectmen for the purposes for which such land is 
currently held to the Board of Selectmen for purposes of sale and to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen to sell the parcel of land and the building per the 
provisions of Massachusetts General Law Chapter 30B, 

and further that such sale not occur unless the following conditions have been 
satisfied: 

(a) the Board of Selectmen issue a "request for proposals" (RFP), 
which shall include design guidelines that are substantially in 
compliance with the Swampscott Planned Development District 
Design Guidelines, November 10, 2008 (the "Design Guidelines") 
and provide that responses meeting the Design Guidelines shall be 
more favorably viewed; 

(b) the Board of Selectmen execute a "Land Development Agreement" 
with the successful responder to the RFP that maximizes the 
benefits to the Town, including restrictions requiring compliance 
with final design guidelines that are substantially in compliance with 
the Design Guidelines; 

(c) the Board of Selectmen approve an affordable housing restriction; 

and 

(d) the Board of Selectmen approve any other restrictions, including 
restrictions on use, that are in the best interests of the Town and 
that would effectuate the purposes of providing the maximum 
benefit to the Town from the proposed sale of the property, upon 
such terms and conditions as the Board of Selectmen may deem 
appropriate and necessary. 

Article 3 



70 



Unanimous Vote. 
11/10/08 STM 



ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to transfer the care, custody, 

management and control of the land and building formerly known as the Phillips Beach 
Fire Station and located at 2 Phillips Avenue, Swampscott, identified on the Town's 
Assessor's maps as: Map 29, Lot 45, from the Board of Selectmen for the purposes for 
which such land is currently held to the Board of Selectmen for purposes of sale and to 
authorize the Chief Procurement Officer to sell the parcel of land and the building per 
the provisions of Massachusetts General Law Chapter SOB, or take any other action 
relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Town Building Oversight Committee 



Comment: This Article, which is based on the recommendation of the 
Town Building Oversight Committee, provides the Selectmen and the 
Town Administrator the authority to sell the former Phillips Beach Fire 
Station. The Executive Summary of the report of the Town Building Study 
Oversight can be found in Appendix A. 

The Finance Committee will report on this Article at Town Meeting. 
Article 4 requires 2/3's affirmative vote to adopt 

ARTICLE 4 AMENDMENT MOTION made and seconded that the Town vote to 
transfer the care, custody, management and control of the land and building 
formerly known as the Phillips Beach Fire Station and loated at 2 Phillips 
Avenue, Swampscott, identified on the Town's Assessor's maps as: Map 29, Lot 
45, from the Board of Selectmen for the purposes for which such land is currently 
held to the Board of Selectmen for purposes of sale and to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen to sell the parcel of land and the building per the provisions of 
Massachusetts General Law Chapter SOB, 

and further that such sale not occur unless the following conditions have been 
satisfied: 

(a) the Board of Selectmen issue a "request for proposals" (RFP), which 
shall include design guidelines that are substantially in compliance with 
the Swampscott Planned Development District Design Guidelines, 
November 10, 2008 (the "Design Guidelines") and provide that 
responses meeting the Design Guidelines shall be more favorably 
viewed; 

(b) the Board of Selectmen execute a "Land Development Agreement" 
with the successful responder to the RFP that maximizes the benefits 
to the Town, including restrictions requiring compliance with final 
design guidelines that are substantially in compliance with the Design 
Guidelines; 

(c) the Board of Selectmen approve any other restrictions, including 
restrictions on use, that are in the best interests of the Town and that 



71 



would effectuate the purposes of providing the maximum benefit to the 
Town from the proposed sale of the property, upon such terms and 
conditions as the Board of Selectmen may deem appropriate and 
necessary. 

Article 4 

Unanimous Vote. 
11/10/08 STM 

ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will vote to transfer the care, custody, 

management and control of the land and building formerly known as Temple 
Israel and located at 837 Humphrey Street, Swampscott, identified on the Town's 
Assessor's maps as: Map 29, Lots 4 and 3A, from the Board of Selectmen for the 
purposes for which such land is currently held to the Board of Selectmen for 
purposes of sale and to authorize the Chief Procurement Officer to sell the 
parcels of land and building per the provisions of Massachusetts General Law 
Chapter SOB, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Town Building Oversight Committee 

Comment: This Article, which is based on the recommendation of the 
Town Building Oversight Committee, provides the Selectmen and the 
Town Administrator the authority to sell the former Temple Israel. The 
Executive Summary of the report of the Town Building Oversight 
Committee can be found in Appendix A. 

The Finance Committee will report on this Article at Town Meeting. 
Article 5 requires 2/3's affirmative vote to adopt 

ARTICLE 5 AMENDMENT MOTION made and seconded that the Town vote to 
transfer the care, custody, management and control of the land and building 
formerly known as the Temple Israel and bated at 837 Humphrey Street, 
Swampscott, identified on the Town's Assessor's maps as: Map 29, Lots 4 and 
3A, from the Board of Selectmen for the purposes for which such land is currently 
held to the Board of Selectmen for purposes of sale and to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen to sell the parcel of land and the building per the provisions of 
Massachusetts General Law Chapter SOB, 

and further that such sale not occur unless the following conditions have been 
satisfied: 

(a) the Board of Selectmen issue a "request for proposals" (RFP), which shall 
include design guidelines that are substantially in compliance with the 
Swampscott Planned Development District Design Guidelines, November 
10, 2008 (the "Design Guidelines") and provide that responses meeting 
the Design Guidelines shall be more favorably viewed; 

(b) the Board of Selectmen execute a "Land Development Agreement" with 
the successful responder to the RFP that maximizes the benefits to the 
Town, including restrictions requiring compliance with final design 



72 



guidelines that are substantially in compliance with the Design Guidelines; 
and 

(c) the Board of Selectmen approve any other restrictions, including 
restrictions on use, that are in the best interests of the Town and that 
would effectuate the purposes of providing the maximum benefit to the 
Town from the proposed sale of the property, upon such terms conditions 
as the Board of Selectmen may deem appropriate and necessary. 
Article 5 

Unanimous Vote. 
11/10/08 s™ 

ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to transfer the care, custody, 

management and control of the land and building formerly known as Swampscott 
Middle School and located at 71 Greenwood Avenue, Swampscott, identified on the 
Town's Assessor's maps as: Map 19, Lot 87, from the School Committee for school 
purposes to the Board of Selectmen for the purposes of sale and to authorize the 
Chief Procurement Officer to sell the parcel of land and building per the provisions of 
Massachusetts General Law Chapter 308, or take any other action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the Town Building Oversight Committee 

Comment: This Article, which is based on the recommendation of the 
Town Building Oversight Committee, provides the Selectmen and the 
Town Administrator the authority to sell the former Greenwood Avenue 
School. The Executive Summary of the report of the Town Building 
Oversight Committee can be found in Appendix A. 

The Finance Committee will report on this Article at Town Meeting. 
Article 6 requires 2/3's affirmative vote to adopt 

ARTICLE 6 AMENDMENT MOTION made and seconded that the Town vote to 
transfer the care, custody, management and control of the land and building 
formerly known as Swampscott Middle School and located at 71 Greenwood 
Avenue, Swampscott, identified on the Town's Assessor's maps as: Map 19, Lot 
87, from the Board of Selectmen for the purposes for which such land is currently 
held to the Board of Selectmen for purposes of sale and to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen to sell the parcel of land and the building per the provisions of 
Massachusetts General Law Chapter 306, 

and further that such sale not occur unless the following conditions have been 
satisfied: 

(a) the Board of Selectmen issue a "request for proposals" (RFP), which shall 
include design guidelines that are substantially in compliance with the 
Swampscott Planned Development District Design Guidelines, November 
10, 2008 (the "Design Guidelines") and provide that responses meeting 
the Design Guidelines shall be more favorably viewed; 

(b) the Board of Selectmen execute a "Land Development Agreement" with 
the successful responder to the RFP that maximizes the benefits to the 



73 



Town, including restrictions requiring compliance with final design 
guidelines that are substantially in compliance with the Design Guidelines; 
and 

(c) the Board of Selectmen approve a restriction that would preserve the 
existing trees and other natural features of the portion of the property 
between Fuller Avenue and the building; and 

(d) the Board of Selectmen approve any other restrictions, including 
restrictions on use, that are in the best interests of the Town and that 
would effectuate the purposes of providing the maximum benefit to the 
Town from the proposed sale of the property, upon such terms conditions 
as the Board of Selectmen may deem appropriate and necessary. 

Article 6 

Unanimous Vote. 
11/10/08 STM 

ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money, 

by borrowing or otherwise to the account of unpaid bills for the purpose of settling 
all bills contracted prior to July 1, 2008, and remaining unpaid at the time of the 
closing of the Town's books for the year ending June 30, 2008, according to the 
records of the Town Accountant, or take any action relative thereto (see 
Appendix B). 

Sponsored by the Board of Selectmen 

Comment: The purpose of this Article is to provide funding for payment 
of bills incurred by the school department for transportation related costs 
during the fiscal years ending prior to July 1, 2008, but not paid during 
those fiscal years. 

North Shore Shuttle (School Department) $10,805.00 
The Finance Committee will report on this Article at Town Meeting. 
Article 7 requires 9/10 affirmative vote to adopt 
Article 7 

Unanimous Vote. 
11/10/08 STM 



ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate $560,266 for 

Fiscal 2009 to improve the Town's water system and that to meet this 
appropriation, the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, is 
authorized to borrow $560,266 under MGL c. 44 or any other enabling authority 
and to issue bonds and notes therefor; and the Board of Selectmen and/or the 
Town Administrator be authorized to contract for and expend any federal, state or 
MWRA aid available for the project, and to authorize the Board of Selectmen 
and/or the Town Administrator to submit, on behalf of the Town, any and all 



74 



applications deemed necessary for grants and/or reimbursements from the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts or the United States under any state and/or 
federal programs to receive and accept such grants or reimbursement for this 
purpose, and/or any others in any way connected with the scope of this Article, 
provided that the amount of the authorized borrowing shall be reduced by the 
amount of such aid received prior to the issuance of bonds or notes under this 
vote and that the Board of Selectmen and/or the Town Administrator be 
authorized to take any other action necessary to carry out this project, or tal<e 
any action relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Director of Public Works 

Comment: In order to receive the Town's share of the allocation, Town 
Meeting has to vote in the affirmative to appropriate the necessary funds. 

Article 8 requires 2/3's affirmative vote to adopt 

Article 8 

Unanimous Vote. 
11/10/08 STM 

ARTICLE 9. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Law 

by changing Section 2.2.3.0 —Table of Principal Uses, Subsection C(12) 
Restaurant, drive-in from the designation in the B-3 Zoning District from N — an 
excluded or prohibited use to SP— A USE AUTHORIZED UNDER 
SPECIAL PERMIT FROM THE BOARD OF APPEALS AS PROVIDED 
UNDER SECTION 3.3.0.0. 

Sponsored by Andrew B. Rose, et al. 

Comment: This Article is a 1 00 registered voter petition per MGL 
Chapter 39, Section 10. 

Article 9 requires 2/3 affirmative vote to adopt 

ARTICLE 9 AMENDMENT MOTION made and seconded to see if the 
Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Law by changing Section 2.2.3.0. — Table 
of Principal Uses, Subsection C (12) Restaurant, drive-in from the designation in 
the B-3 Zoning District from N— an excluded or prohibited use to SP— A USE 
AUTHORIZED UNDER SPECIAL PERMIT FROM THE BOARD OF APPEALS 
AS PROVIDED UNDER SECTION 5.3.0.0. 
Article 9 
Majority Vote. 
11/10/08 STM 

ARTICLE 9 MOTION made and seconded to call the question. 
Article 9 
Majority Vote. 
11/10/08 STM 



75 



ARTICLE 9 MAIN MOTION WITH VOTED AMENDMENT made and 
seconded. 

Article 9 requires 2/3 affirmative vote to adopt 
Article 9 

Counted Vote: NO-85, YES-84 (defeated, not a 2/3's vote) 
11/10/08 STM 

MOTION MADE AND SECONDED TO ADJOURN THE SPECIAL TOWN MEETING AT 10:20 
p.m. 

Majority Vote. 
11/10/08 STM 



Hereof fail not and make return of this Warrant with your doings thereon at the time and 
place of said meeting. 

Given under our hand this 14th day of October, 2008 
BOARD OF SELECTMEN 




76 



APPENDIX A 



77 



ADDITIONAL MATERIAL 



78 



Town of Swampscott 



Report of the Town Building Oversight Committee 

November 2008 



The following information is presented to you in advance of Town Meeting to provide 
background with respect to the process and methodology employed by the Town 
Building Oversight Committee as it explored options and arrived at recommendations 
for the disposition of four town properties. 



Background 

The Town Building Oversight committee was formed by the Town Meeting of May 6, 
2008 in Article 2, to advise the Board of Selectmen, the Town Administrator, and Town 
Meeting on the future use or disposition of four town owned properties: 

• Greenwood Avenue Middle School 

• Temple Israel 

• Phillips Avenue Fire Station 

• Burrill Street Senior Center 

The committee was charged with recommending the following with respect to these 
properties: 

• Future Use 

• Zoning Amendments 

• Deed Restrictions 

• Design Guidelines 

• Creation of Requests for Proposals (RFPs) 
TBOC Committee Members are as follows: 

■ Jill Sullivan, Chair (Board of Selectmen) 

■ Michael McClung, Vice Chair (Finance Committee) 

■ Joe Markarian (Capital Improvements Committee) 

■ Carl Christie 

■ Martin Grasso 

■ William O'Brien 

■ Gail Rosenberg 

The TBOC was assisted by Danielle McKnight, the Swampscott Town Planner, by Ted 
Carman and Angus Jennings of Concord Square Planning & Development, Inc., the 
committee's outside consultant, and by Attorney Patricia Cantor of Kopelman & Paige, 
Town Counsel. 



79 



Report of the Town Building Oversight Committee 



The TBOC will be asking Town Meeting to take the following actions: 

• Transfer the Greenwood Avenue property to the Board of Selectmen to be sold and 
redeveloped for multi-unit residential use of up to 41 units, subject to appropriate 
zoning restrictions and design standards; 

• Transfer the Temple Israel property to the Board of Selectmen to be sold and 
redeveloped for multi-unit residential use of up to 42 units, subject to appropriate 
zoning restrictions and design standards; 

• Transfer the Phillips Avenue Fire Station to the Board of Selectmen to be sold as a 
single family residence, with the requirement that the historical structure be 
retained, and subject to appropriate zoning restrictions and design standards; 

• Transfer the Burrill Street Senior Center to the Board of Selectmen to be sold and 
redeveloped for up to three affordable housing units, subject to appropriate zoning 
restrictions and design standards; 

• Approve zoning amendments to allow the redevelopment of the parcels as 
described above. 



Overview of Financial Implications 

The financial implications of the potential sale and reuse of each property was based on 
industry accepted appraisal techniques. Comparable property sales, well-founded 
construction cost projections, and other variables customary to large and small projects 
were incorporated. The analyses were completed by Concord Square Planning & 
Development, Inc. and provided the following possible range of outcomes. 

Low 



Greenwood Avenue 

Potential sale proceeds 
Projected annual tax revenue 

Temple Israel 

Potential sale proceeds 
Projected annual tax revenue 

Phillips Ave. Fire Station 

Potential sale proceeds 
Projected annual tax revenue 

Burrill Street Senior Center 

Projected Value of Land 
Projected Annual Property Taxes 



$1,900,000 
$150,000 



$200,000 
$9,400 



$84,000* 
$1,760 



to 
to 



$2,620,800 to 
$216,000 to 



to 
to 



to 
to 



High 

$2,400,000 
$190,000 



$3,276,000 
$270,000 



$250,000 
$11,700 



$105,000* 
$2,200 



* The amount for the Senior Center is low because the affordable units must be sold at prices of not more 
than $165,000 per unit (for three bedroom condominiums). 



80 



Report of the Town Building Oversight Committee 



TBOC Decision Methodology 

The recommendations of the TBOC are the product of a thorough analysis of the 
individual properties^ within parameters of the planning goals and financial needs of the 
Town of Swampscott as a whole. At the outset^ the committee established a framework, 
formed of three components, by which to evaluate the variables impacting each 
property: 

• The legal requirements for any change in ownership or use of the properties 

• The long-term financial implications to the town 

• The impact of change on the immediate neighborhoods. 

All analyses and decision making was conducted with the goal of equitably balancing the 
town's financial needs and the concerns of the neighborhoods. Scenarios for property 
development that could yield greater financial return to the town, compared to those 
recommended, were ultimately viewed as unreasonably compromising the integrity of the 
neighborhoods and of the community. Conversely, some neighbors expressed the desire 
for much less intense development at certain sites, but it became immediately clear that 
such proposals would not faidy compensate the town for the sale its assets. The TBOC 
believes that its recommendations strike the proper balance by offering the town 
significant financial benefits both in near-future sales proceeds and long-term tax revenue 
generation, while maintaining neighborhood integrity. • 

Critical to optimizing financial benefits for the town and protecting neighborhoods was 
the process of testing concepts and controls. It was essential for the TBOC to arrive at 
reasonable restrictions on building height, property line setbacks and maximum building 
square footage, as well as minimum requirements for open space and adequate on-site 
parking. By doing so through a trial and error process, the TBOC is satisfied that the 
result will attract RFP respondents who see the potential for meaningful profit, and appeal 
to neighbors as respectful of their concerns. 

The resulting schematic drawings are an example of just one design out of many that 
mi ght be possible given the zoning criteria established. The TBOC is hopeful that the 
development community will use its creative vision to propose exciting and well thought 
out projects while complying with the zoning regulations and design guidelines the 
committee has established. 



81 



Report of the Town Building Oversight Committee 



Evaluation Process 

The TBOC has completed the following tasks prior to making its recommendations: 

■ Reviewed ail prior research and reports 

■ Commissioned new certified plot plans for each property 

■ Obtained and reviewed deeds for all parcels 

■ Met with Building Study Committee 

■ Worked with Town Counsel on issues of zoning amendments, conveyance, and 
preparation of the Town Meeting warrant 

■ Worked with Town Planner, Danielle McKnight on planning issues 

■ Worked with consultant, Concord Square Planning and Development to 
compare various redevelopment scenarios, understand financial implications, 
and develop design standards 

■ Conducted town-wide meetings to solicit resident input 

■ Reviewed many RFPs from other towns 

■ Outlined high level RFP templates 

■ Outlined selection criteria for developers 

■ Met with Zoning By-Law Review Committee on proposed zoning amendments 

■ Conducted required Planning Board public hearing on zoning amendments 

The TBOC analyzed the following issues with respect to each property: 

• Sell or keep for town use 

• Sell now or hold 

• Whether or not to set a minimum bid requirement 

• Commercial vs. Residential Use 

• Over 55 Residential Development 

• Town benefits vs. neighborhood concerns 

• Financial projections of sales proceeds and future tax revenues 

• Impact of design restrictions on marketability of properties 

• Historical considerations 

• Need for on site parking 



Zoning 

The TBOC recommends that zoning for each of the four town properties under 
consideration be changed to new Planned Development Districts (PDD). A PDD is a 

zoning tool that allows implementation of specific land use planning objectives, A PDD 
is intended to ensure controlled property redevelopment and architectural designs that 
will be in harmony with the existing quality and character of the surrounding 
neighborhood. The PDD is a tailored district in which zoning regulations for planned 
projects are designated, specific development standards are set^ and consistency with 
stated town planning goals are ensured . 



82 



Report of the Town Building Oversight Committee 



Concern was voiced at community meetings that the properties would be over-developed 
as sO'Called MOB projects." The TBOC would like to clarify that this cannot be the case. 
A comprehensive permit under Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 40B is typically 
sought by the private owner of a property when he desires to circumvent municipal 
zoning regulations. Because the Town owns and controls the properties in question, and 
acts to regulate development, a Chapter 40B permit will not be an option for a potential 
buyer. 

The TBOC recommends that each parcel under consideration be transferred into a PDD 
unique to that site, with specific zoning regulations as to setbacks, height, density, 
parking, etc. that will define development on that site. These regulations are specified in 
the Zoning Amendments detailed in Town Meeting Warrant articles. In addition, included 
in this submittal is a narrative explanation of the zoning changes contemplated at each 
site, so that town meeting members clearly understand what is being proposed. 

Process for Selection, Sale and Development 

Once town meeting approves the transfer of the properties to the Board of Selectmen, 
authorizes the sale of each, and approves Zoning Amendments, the following process is 
planned: 

• The TBOC will complete the drafting of a Request for Proposals (RFP) for the sale of 
each property (already underway) to reflect the vote of town meeting. 

• RFPs will be published on the Commonwealth of Massachusetts Central Registry in 
the early part of 2009. 

• RFP responses will be received and initially screened by the Board of Selectmen 
based on a matrix of selection criteria included in this submittal. 

• The Board of Selectmen will reduce the all RFPs to finalists and will make a final 
selection in a public process. 

• The Town Administrator and the Board of Selertmen will negotiate a Land 
Development Agreement and a Purchase and Sale Agreement with the winning 
respondent, which will detail the timing of conveyance, the scope of development, 
construction management and staging requirements, insurance, etc. 

• The respondent will engage in the permitting process, including Site Plan Review. 

• Prior to the issuance of Site Plan Approval, the Board of Selectmen or its designee 
will ensure compliance with agreed upon design guidelines. 

It should be noted that the Town is not required to accept any proposal if it determines 
that no proposal provides necessary benefits and meets town economic or design goals. 

To protect the town, the RFPs will specifically state that the Town reserves the right to 
reject any and all proposals. 



83 



Report of the Town Building Oversight Committee 



Further Information Enclosed 

The following items are enclosed with this submittal: 

□ An informational paci<et on each property outlining existing conditions, 
reuse considerations, use recommendations, sample project schematics and 
statistical analysis of reuse. 

□ A narrative analysis of recommended zoning changes. 

□ Proposed design guidelines for each property. 

□ A matrix of criteria developed for selection of a respondent. 

When looking at this information, it is important to recognize, particularly with respect 
to the Temple and Greenwood Avenue properties, that the schematic drawings we 
present are conceptual in nature and do not represent the actual projects that 
respondents are required to build. 

If you have any questions regarding any of the information contained in this submittal, the 
TBOC respectfully requests that you contact any of our members for further information or 
explanation prior to town meeting. 

The TBOC has been honored to serve the town and looks forward to its continuing role in 
promoting this exciting opportunity for the benefit of the Town of Swampscott. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Town Building Oversight Committee 



84 



ADDITIONAL MATERIAL 



85 



Swampscott Town Building OvBrsipti^p^mi^!^} Swampscott Town Building Oversight Committee 

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91 



HOW TO READ THIS TABLE 



All items shown in grey are either 
pre-exktlng nvjasurenvents or 
consistent with existing zoning 



I Phillips Fire 
\l , Station PDD 



'Cinrcnt^ ■ 
ZDnjng^vouId 
only require 
||1.5 spaces 



V tkrag^ td abut . 
||jdB&M right- 
l^^-way, provides' 
Hreater clearance 
i/or neighboring 



Minimum Lot Area 
Minimum Lot Frontage 
Front Yard Setback 

Rear Yard Setback 

Side Yard Setbacks 

Maximum Gross Floor Area 
Open Space Requirement 
Total Lot Coverage 

Maximum 

Height * 

...1 

Minimum Parking Spaces 
per Dvuelling Unit 

Minimum Parking 
Space Size 

Minimum Width of Parking 
Lot Circulation Lanes 

Maximum Number of 
Dwellir^ Units 



Garage or storage space for 
private aufonrKibiles 



Maximum Number of 
Principal Structures per Lot 



2 spaces 



20 feet from 
rear lot line 
feet from 
western lot line 



Burrill Senior 
Center PDD 



2 spaces 



Greenwood PDD 

'fi^y 

60 feet 
60 feet 
35 feet 

90,000 sf 
35% 
None Required 

60 feet" 
2 spaces 
9 ft by 18 ft 
20 feet 
41 



Temple 
PDD 



40 feet 

40 feet 
(north side) 

20 feet 
(south side) 

20 feet 
(east side) 



70,000 sf % 
45% 
None Required 

45 feet 



2 spaces 



9 ft by 18 ft 
By-Law \, 




coverage 
througli 
open space 

It::. 




42 




parici)^^^^^^ 
space'^ 
requirenveut: 



Maximum height is measured to the peak of the finished roof. 
Excluding the existing cupola. 
By-Law means that the provisions of the Swampscott Zoning By-Law other than those applicable to a 
Planned Development District apply.See Section 4.5.5.0. 



^provides dev€ 
^jQejdbilityto 
if^nd encourages paridn^ 
^■^ominon view 



92 




The Town Building Study Committee was formed by vote of the Spring Town Meeting. Its charge is to 
make recommendations for the disposition of four town owned properties identified as surplus by the 
Town Administration, Selectmen, and School Committee, as shown on the map below. This flyer in- 
cludes draft Design Guidelines to govern the redevelopment of each property and will be included in 
Requests for Proposals (RFPs) to be issued for site disposition and redevelopment The Design Guide- 
lines will form the basis for decisions by de- 
velopers on site and building design upon 
project completion. Proposals meeting the 
Design Guidelines wiU be more favorably 
viewed by the Town. Finally, the Town will 
enforce cornpUance with Design Guidelines 
during the permitting process. 

The Committee will continue to rejSne this 
draft for completion prior to Town Meet- 
ing. However, this document provides a good 
background. 





Fire Station on Phillips Avenue 



The Fire Station on Phillips Avenue was b\iilt in 1903 with a distinc- 
tive and attractive design that incorporates stone, btick and shingles, 
resulting in a historic Craftsman character. The objective for the 
building is for it to be fully renovated and converted to single-fainily 
residential use. The renovations shoiild incorporate the architectural 
features of the building, maintaining the key elements of the existing 
windows, doors, roof and cornice lines. The garage openings may be 
filled in with bays that are consistent with the overall character of 
the building. The new bays can be either windows or a main en- 
trance to the building. A new garage of appropriate design may be 
added at the rear of the lot. 



Key points: 

• Restoradon of the historic Craftsman character required. 

• No changes will be allowed to the existing building footprint or its 
overall structure, except to construct a two-car garage at the rear of 
the site and, if desired, to allow the rebuilding of the original tower 
(used to dry fire hoses). 

• Existing garage bays may be filled in with bay windows and/or a 
new main entry designed to be consistent with the character of the 
existing building. 

• Existing windows and doors to be 
repaired/restored to their original 
condition. Combination storm win- 
dows would be allowed. 

• Replacing front parking area with 
landscaping may be appropriate. 




/Recommended Use: single fBmily residence. 





93 




Greenwood Avenue Middle School 



Recommended Use: multi-family residential, maximum 4 1 
units, including renovation ofpre-1936 school building. 




The Greenwood School was built in 1895. It was substantially 
rebuilt and enlarged in 1936 with a Colbnial Revival aesthetic. 
The site of the school is one of the highest elevation pieces of . 
land between Swampscott and Boston, atid offers excellent views 
of the Oceaii. The objective for thie reuse of the ptopetty is to - 
retain and reflovate the original school building, demolish the 
1936 additions, and to allow the construction of a new building- 
the rear of the site. The school is to be tetiovated ill a historicallji^j 
sensitive y^'^j, with appropiiate attention to existing windows^ . , 
roof lines, d6ors,_ ^d pedinients/Wiiidbw op6niiajgs should be , , '■ 
iully titilized (without blank fiH-ihs)'. TTie new; building wovd^^^ 
no larger than and no higher than the Greenwood School, and ' 
slibtild Be designed to; be compatible wth the hiCtO chatactei:: } ' • 
of the existing school- Ite new building inay include wjhdoAs^s , 
that are kr^er thaii: those at the school so gs to rnkjumi^ic thb • 
vdiie of Re views. Particiilit ■ * ' 

s.hg.p 6 4n^ forni of tfcie to:pf line' of the new biiilding: ; • ' ' ' ' 



Illustrative site plan . 
The schematic design drawing be- 
low was created by architects hired 
by the Town Building Study Com- 
mittee. It represents a design option, 
and was completed as part of the 
Committee 's site analysis Bidders to 
redevelop the property will prepare 
their own design ideas to be gov- 
erned by Design Guidelines 



Key Points: 

• The 1 895 portion of the building would be required to be renovated. 

• The newer portions of the existing building would be demolished, result- 
ing in increased building setbacks from neighbors. 

• Design and building rm\.Qna\i of any new building would be required to 
be complernentary to the historic design of the original school building. 
Large windows on new construction would be encouraged. 

• Windows and doors of the 1 895 building would be restored to the origi- 
nal openings without blank portions, and be visually appropriate to the 
historical structure and the brick detailing around the openings. 

• Mechanical systems, including HVAC, would be hidden from view. 

• The roof of any new building should be compatible with the hip style roof 
of the 1 895 building, with no false facade roofs or flat roofs. 

• Sidewalks are to be designed for pedestrian access and safety. 

• The site and parking at^^s are to be screened from abutting properties. 

• Existing trees and vegetation between Fuller Street and the building are to 
be retained and maintained with improvements to eliminate erosion, and 
to provide a sitting / picnic area and walking path to Fuller Street. 




94 



Senior Center 



The Senior Center on Burrill Stteet was built in 1 885. It contains 
4,250 square feet of building space, j^ocated near other public 
buildings, it was considered /or potential demolition and con- 
struction of a parking lot. Tlie Committed has rejected that 6p- 
tion in favor of using tlie proper t}' for two or three units of af- 
fordable housing. The building's historical character should be 
maintained through renovations so that the structure continues to 
contribute to the charm of tlie neighborhood. 



Key Points; 

• Each of the units would be required to be affordable to 
families earning 80% or less of the area median income, 
with such restriction to last at least 30 years. 

• By banking industry lending standards and based 

on projected affordable buyer income, unit sale prices would 
be in the range of $ 1 75,000 to $2 1 0,000. 

• The existing historical building is to be retained. No additions or char- 
acter-changing alterations to the building's exterior would be allowed. 

• Appropriate restoration of the historical details of the building is en- 
couraged, in particular of the windows and doors, cornice, roof, chim- 
ney and front porch and deck details. Combination storm doors and 
windows are acceptable and encouraged for energy savings. 

• The modern one-story addition at rear of building may be demolished. 

• Exterior siding would be restored, repaired, or replaced with similar 
materials. No vinyl or aluminum siding would be allowed. 

• A new window may be installed in the front facade for the attic. 

• The existing pavement should be reduced to the minimum needed to 
accommodate off-street parking. The site should be landscaped ap- 
propriately, incorporating outdoor spaces for the residential units. 




Recommended Use: multi-family 
residential, maximum 3 units. 




The following principles would apply to all of the properties. 

• Stormwater Management must incorporate Low Impact Development strategies such as drainage swales and 
bioretention basins to encourage stormwater infiltration, and minimize volume and improve quality of runoff. 

• Existing public utility connections for each site would be maintained/improved. 

• Zoning Amendments to be considered by Town Meeting will establish required parking ratios and dimensions. 

• Outdoor lighting fixtures would be designed with a full cut-off and follow "dark skies" principles to ensure that 
no light would be shed ^oso^s property lines. 




Board of Selectmen 
Swampscott Town Hall 
22 Monument Avenue 
Swampscott, MA 01907 
781-596-8850 
www.town.swampscott.ma.us 



95 



Temple Israel 



The Temple Israel was purchased by the Town in June 2006. 
The buildings are cucrendy vacant, and the Committee recom- 
mends redevelopment of the site with a maximum of 42 hous- 
ing units in two buildings of not more than 3 stories in height 
The surrounding neighborhood has many large single family 
homes and was developed with an interesting variety of archi- 
tectotal styles. New buildings designed for the site would differ 
in form, but should be compatible in design and detail work 
with the high quality architecture of these nearby homes, with 
articulations, materials, fenestratioti, and roof lines that provide 
a visual appearance compatible with the large homes on the 
surrounding streets. To the extent feasible, parking should be 
provided under the buildings. 




Key Points: 

• No portion of the existing building would be required to be preserved. 

• Building design and detail elements should be compatible with and com- 
plementary to the existing residences in the area. 

• The main entrances should face Humphrey Street. 

• Garage entrances should not be visible from Humphrey Street. 

• Roofs should not be flat or have false facades, except in areas where roof- 
top mechanical equipment is located, which would be screened. 

• To the extent feasible, parking areas would be underground and/or un- 
der the building. On-grade parking would be behind the buildings rela- 
tive to Humphrey Street. 

• Sidewalks would be constructed to provide appropriate and safe pedes- 
trian access and circulation. 

• The site would be buffered from adjacent properties in a manner that is 
compatible with a primarily single-family neighborhood. 

• The site should be landscaped, especially along the street frontage, in a 
manner that is compatible with a single-family neighborhood. 



Recommended Use: multi-family, 
three stories, maximum 42 units. 



Illustrative site plan . 

The schematic design drawing be- 
low was created by architects hired 

by the Town Building Study Com- 
mittee. It represents a design option 

and was completed as part of the 
Committee's site analysis Bidders to 
redevelop the property will prepare 

their own design ideas to be gov- 
erned by Design Guidelines 





96 



Selection Criteria for Greenwood Avenue and Temple Israel Properties 



The intent of this Request for Proposal is to gather information upon which to base the selection 
of a proposal and development team for the development of the Property. The submittals will be 
evaluated to determine the developer most responsive to the Town objectives and the entity most 
highly qualified to implement the development based on the following criteria which are not 
listed in any particular order of priority. 



The following criteria will be utilized: 



Highly Advantageous Response exceeds the specific criterion. 

Advantageous Response meets evaluation standard for the criterion. 

Least Advantageous Response does not jfiilly meet the criterion or leaves a 

question or issue not fully addressed. 
Not Responsive Does not address the criterion. 

1. Qualifications and Experience of the Firm and/or Principals 

and Consultants 



Staffing with strong team experience, including a history of prior working relationships 
among the principal respondent and all related consultants and subcontractors: 



• Highly advantageous: 4 or more projects as a team 

• Advantageous: 2-3 projects as a team 

• Least advantageous: 1 project as a team 

Demonstrated ability of the respondent to lead the development effort from 
predevelopment to full occupancy, specifically with regard to maintaining compliance 
with all applicable regulatory constraints: 

• Highly advantageous: 4 or more projects as a team 

• Advantageous: 2-3 projects as a team 

• Least advant^eous: 1 project as a team 

Demonstrated cohesiveness of the project team to maintain its key principals and 
personnel in their respective roles through the duration of the project: 



Highly advantageous: 4 or more projects as a team 
Advantageous: 2-3 projects as a team 
Least advantageous: 1 project as a team 



Level and quality of previous developments: 



Highly advantageous: 4 or more projects as a team 
Advantageous: 2-3 projects as a team 
Least advantageous: 1 project as a team 



Financial capacity to complete the development in a timely manner, to be evaluated with 
regard to respondent's prior experience and history in real estate development and written 
assurances and commitments or letters of interest from prospective lenders: 



97 



• Highly advantageous: 4 or more projects as a team 

• Advantageous: 2-3 projects as a team 

• Least advantageous: 1 project as a team 

Experience with historic structures and Secretary of the Interior's Standards for the 
Treatment of Historic Properties: 

• Highly advantageous: 4 or more projects as a team 

• Advantageous: 2-3 projects as a team 

• Least advantageous: 1 project as a team 

Ability to be accountable on any matter affecting the Town's interest throughout 
development of the entire project: 

• Highly advantageous: 3 or more years of experience with municipalities 

• Advantageous: 1-3 years of experience with municipalities 

• Least advantageous: less than 1 year of experience with municipalities 

Experience developing multi-family housing and/or historic preservation projects: 

• Highly advantageous: 5 or more years of experience with multi-family housing 
and/or historic preservation projects 

• Advantageous: 1-5 years of experience with multi-family housing and/or historic 
preservation projects 

• Least advantageous: less than 1 year of experience with multi-family housing 
and/or historic preservation projects 

Ability to maintain and manage the multi- family housing and/or historic preservation 
projects: 

• Highly advantageous: 5 or more years of experience maintaining and managing 
multi-family housing and/or historic preservation projects 

• Advantageous: 1-5 years of experience maintaining and managing multi-family 
housing and/or historic preservation projects 

• Least advantageous: less than 1 year of experience maintaining and managing 
multi-family housing and/or historic preservation projects 



98 



Demonstrated Compatibility with Town's Objectives and 
Development Considerations 

Compatibility of developer's vision and development concept with Town's objectives 

• Highly advantageous: 3 or more municipal projects demonstrating successful 
integration of developer's vision and implementation with municipality's objectives 
similar to Town's objectives 

• Advantageous: 2 municipal projects demonstrating successful integration of 
developer's vision and implementation with municipality's objectives similar to 
Town's objectives 

• Least advantageous: 1 municipal project demonstrating successful integration of 
developer's vision and implementation with municipality's objectives similar to 
Town's objectives 

Quality and breadth of conceptual development proposals: 

• Highly advantageous: completeness of submission and at least 3 years of experience 
with similar projects 

• Advantageous: most of the material being provided and 2-3 years of experience with 
similar projects 

• Least advantageous: at least some of the material being provided and 1 to 2 years of 
experience with similar projects 

Timeliness of proposed development schedule (exceeding/meeting the expectation of the 
Town's stated schedule): 

• Highly advantageous: exceeding the expectation of the Town's stated schedule 

• Advantageous: meeting the expectation of the Town's stated schedule 

• Least advantageous: not meeting the expectation of the Town's stated schedule 

Ability to adjust the development concept to address evolving design, conceptual 
alternatives, plans, specifications, and financial conditions: 

• Highly advantageous: exceptional ability to adjust to evolving design and 
development conditions demonstrated by experience with similar projects 

• Advantageous: ability to adjust to evolving design and development conditions 
demonstrated by experience with similar projects 

• Least advantageous: some ability to adjust to evolving design and development 
conditions demonstrated by experience with similar projects 



99 



3. demonstrated Ability to Implement Project Concept 



Evidence of the ability of the development team to commence substantive pre-permitting 
work upon award of contract, including preparation of drawings and plans and 
applications for funding within thirty (30) days of selection, ability to implement the 
Land Development Agreement, and ability to accomplish the acquisition or leasing of the 
property following issuance of the required permits and evidence of a financing 
commitment: 



• Highly advantageous: exceeding the expectation of the Town's stated schedule 

• Advantageous: meeting the expectation of the Town's stated schedule 

• Least advantageous: not meeting the expectation of the Town's stated schedule 

Evidence of availability of financial resources needed to begin pre-development and 
permit process work upon award of contract: 

• Highly advantageous: exceeding the availability of financial resources needed for the 
project based on the developer's project budget and financing package 

• Advantageous: adequately meeting the availability of financial resources needed for 
the project based on the developer's project budget and financing package 

• Least advantageous: only meeting the availability of financial resources needed for 
the project based on the developer's project budget and financing package 

Evidence of key staff members' abilities to undertake a project of the magnitude of the 
one proposed, including engineers, architects, managers and general contractors: 

• Highly advantageous: 4 or more projects as a team 

• Advantageous: 2 -3 projects as a team 

• Least advantageous: 1 project as a team 

Evidence of feasibility of proposed project, including finalizing a detailed budget that 
addresses envirorunental and permitting issues and financing issues. 

• Highly advantageous: exceptional feasibility analysis including budget issues, 
environmental and permitting issues and financing issues 

• Advantageous: adequate feasibility analysis including budget issues, environmental 
and permitting issues and financing issues 

• Least advantageous: incomplete feasibility analysis including budget issues, 
environmental and permitting issues and fmancing issues 



358443/SWAM/0136 



100 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING November 10, 2008 Attendance: 201 



Pre Exp. Name 




1 201 1 Baldacci, Richard R 


X 


1 2011 Blonder, Jeffrey S 




1 2011 Cresta, Gino A Jr 


X 


1 201 1 Dandreo, Robert 


X 


1 2011 Davis Jeremy 


X 


1 2011 Hyde, Sally A 


X 


1 2011 Hyde, William R Sr 


X 


1 201 1 Kessler, Nelson 


X 


1 2011 LeBlanc Dean 




1 201 1 PIcariello, Jolin A 


X 


1 201 1 Picarieilo, Lawrence 




1 201 1 Serino, IVlichael A 




1 201 1 Speranza, Frances 




1 201 1 Cremer, Herbert 




1 2011 Shannon, Collin 




1 2011 Adams, Ryan 




1 2011 Vacancy 




1 2011 Vacancy 




1 2010 Abrams, Alan 


X 


1 2010 Bates, Wallace T. 




1 2010 Buchanan, Susan 


X 


1 2010 Byron-Adams Michelle 




1 2010 Chavez, Robert 


X 


1 2010 Cropley, John H. Jr. 


X 


1 2010 DiPietro, Ross 




1 2010 Hartmann, Eric 


X 


1 2010 Hartmann, Marianne 




1 2010 Hayes, Jeanne 




1 2010 Hubauer, Shawn 




1 2010 Marston, Denise 




1 2010 Miles, Denise 




1 2010 Patrikis, Theodore A. 


X 


1 2010 Rizzo, Carole 




1 2010 Rooks, Norma H 


X 


1 2010 Schultz, Hugh (Jim) 




1 2010 Whittier, Douglas 


X 


1 2009 Bartlett-Genest Lee 


X 


1 2009 Batchelder Kathleen 




1 2009 Chouinard Leah 




1 2009 Condon Linda 




1 2009 Finlay Patricia 


X 


1 2009 Johnson Maryalice 


X 


1 2009 Kearney Sheila 


X 


1 2009 Keay Maralyn 




1 2009 Lombard James 


X 


1 2009 Maher William 




1 2009 Miles, Chris 


X 


1 2009 Montague, Neil 


X 


1 2009 Pierce Kimberly 




1 2009 Pierce Todd 




1 2009 Powell Sally 


X 


1 2009 Shannon Cynthia 


X 


1 2009 Wheeler. Matt 




1 2009 Wu Heng Sien 





101 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING November 10. 2008 Attendance: 201 



Pre 


Exp. Name 




2 


201 1 Amore, Anthony 




2 


2011 Barden, Eugene 


X 


2 


2011 Bowen, David 


X 


2 


201 1 Cameron, Janell A 


X 


2 


2011 Doherty, John J 


X 


2 


2011 Hebert, Donald 


X 


2 


201 1 Jones, Patrick 


X 


2 


2011 Marcou, Martha L 




2 


2011 McHugh, Donna 




2 


2011 Morrell, Agatha 




2 


2011 IVIurphy, Brian C 




2 


2011 Newhali, Linda A 


X 


2 


2011 Newhali, Walter 


X 


2 


2011 Romano, John L 


X 


2 


2011 Shanahan, Joseph E Jr 




2 


2011 Strauss, Danielle 


X 


2 


2011 Schultz, Nancy 




2 


2011 Cooper, Robin 




2 


2010 Caron, Mark R 


X 


2 


2010 Curry, Martha 




2 


2010 Dunn, Judith F 


X 


2 


2010 Eichler, Tanis 




2 


2010 Gioiosa, Kellie 




2 


2010 Hebert, Janet 


X 


2 


2010 Jackson, Lorene 


X 


2 


2010 Jackson, William 


X 


2 


2010 Pinkerton, Don 


X 


2 


2010 Pitman, Michael 




2 


2010 Ramstine, Patricia Karamas 


X 


2 


2010 Reardon, Ellen M 


X 


2 


2010 Richmond, David E 


X 


2 


2010 Rosenberg, Gail 


X 


2 


2010 Schultz, Jackson 


X 


2 


2010 Scibelli, Anthony A 


X 


2 


2010 Strauss, Matthew 


X 


2 


2010 Whalen, Michael 


X 


2 


2009 Carrigan Bacik Lisa 




2 


2009 Blonder Susan 




2 


2009 Crimmins Joseph 


X 


2 


2009 Dunn Larry 




2 


2009 Giangregorio Richard 




2 


2009 Hamel, Greg 




2 


2009 Hamilton Bruce 




2 


2009 Hunt Stephen 


X 


2 


2009 McCafferty Rose 


X 


2 


2009 McLaughlin John 




2 


2009 Mulvey Edward 


X 


2 


2009 Ruggiero John 




2 


2009 Ryan Leah 




2 


2009 Spritz Wayne 


X 


2 


2009 Vogel Kristen 


X 


2 


2009 Vogel, John 


X 


2 


2009 Whelan David Jr 


X 


2 


2009 Zamansky Elizabeth Belkin 





FECIAL TO^MffiTiNC > »iw fc w >%>li» Attendance: 201 



Pre Exp. Name 




3 


201 1 Bre«i. Kevr F 


\ 


3 


2011 Breen, Lesiie A 


w 

X 


3 


2011 CasskJy, John R 




3 


2011 Cotetf.Jattfili 




3 


2011 Dan(fceo.EMBi JM 




3 


2011 Oomekiwicz. Joseph 




3 


2011 DnscdiAraie 




3 


2011 Bdridge. Bartiara F 




3 


2011 Frenioei, Ridwl 




3 


2011 Keleher.lMaG 




3 


2011 Lute Gerald 




3 


2011 Magee. KaWntn 


X 


3 


^011 Penyack. JofottiHi 


X 


3 


!011 Peny.GerafcID 


X 


3 


!011 FrenkeJ, Lewa 




3 


!011 Barden,Ganr 


X 


3 


011 Grimes. Daniel 


X 


3 


^011 Bogardus. DebonH 


X 


3 


!010 Davis. Deborah 




3 


010 Cormier. KaMeen 


X 


3 


010 Donaher. KeMii 


X 


3 


010 SpeBos.PelerA 


X 


3 


010 Fox. Debo'^'- 




3 


010 Legere. Ca~. 


X 


'i 


010 Fraser. Cs-a 




3 


010 Cotela, - -zi 




3 


010 Colete, 5;-: . 




3 


010 Small, Frr-: 




3 


010 E :- 5::- 


X 


3 


010 V :;f 


X 


3 


310 - -:: - - ; - 


X 


3 


310 Sacns-^-f-;- zi z,-^ 


X 


3 


310 




3 


310 Thomser e^- 


X 


3 


310 Weteler.yary 




3 


310 Wright. Suzanne 


X 


3 


309 BoggsDeborahA 




3 


309 Cardenas Patricia 


X 


3 


309 DePaolc Ja- 


X 


3 


309 Donaher K3i-=r- 


X 


3 


309 Galagher, Tara 


X 


3 


309 Genowersa Stxsar 




3 


309 Kenney Stephen 




3 


309 Lincain Lonng B Jr 




3 


309 MarvoGii, SmSa 




3 


309 MeislerThelnna Young 


X 


3 


309 Mottz Sandra 


X 


3 


309 MuigaylM 


X 


3 


309 PeoQe Denis 


X 


3 


309 Richanl Dianne 




3 


309 DaveyMaryann 


X 


3 


309 WeaverOavid 


X 


3 


309 Weidi Thoraas 


X 


3 


309 Zeman. Cynfaa 





SPECIAL TOWN MEETING November 10, 2008 Attendance: 201 



Pre 


Exp. 


Name 




4 


2011 


Baker, Janet N 


X 


4 


2011 


Balsama, Joseph J 


X 


4 


2011 


Barden, Marc 


X 


4 


2011 


Dansdill, Martha 


X 


4 


2011 


DeChillo, Mary H 


X 


4 


2011 


DiMento, William R 


X 


4 


2011 


Donelan, Robert E 




4 


2011 


Drummond, Brian 


X 


4 


2011 


Drummond, Ellen M 


X 


4 


2011 


Goldman, Iris 


X 


4 


2011 


Goudreau, Connie 


X 


4 


2011 


Howe, Christopher 


X 


4 


2011 


Hughes, Nancy 




4 


2011 


Lord, Gary 




4 


2011 


Lord, Nancy 




4 


2011 


Meninno, Christine 




4 


2011 


Watson Brian T 


X 


4 


2011 


Wynne, Katie 


X 


4 


2010 


Brown, Andrew 


X 


4 


2010 


Cunningham, Kelly 




4 


2010 


Faico, Michael 




4 


2010 


Jurma, Jer 




4 


2010 


Krippendorf, Edward W. Sr 


X 


4 


2010 


Leger, Jeanne 


X 


4 


2010 


Mcenaney, John T 


X 


4 


2010 


McNerney, Cynthia 


X 


4 


2010 


O'Brien, Laurie 


X 


4 


2010 


Phelan, John VIII 


X 


4 


2010 


Powell, Amy 


X 


4 


2010 


Reagan, John 


X 


4 


2010 


Shanahan, Patricia D 


X 


4 


2010 


Kraft, Richard 


X 


4 


2010 


Somer, Margaret 




4 


2010 


Stone, Myron S 


X 


4 


2010 


Walsh, Karyn LK 


X 


4 


2010 


Withrow, Marysusan Buckley 


X 


4 


2009 


Anderson Dana 




4 


2009 


Bonazzoli, Paula 




4 


2009 


Brown Rachel 


X 


4 


2009 


Dawley Thomas 


X 


4 


2009 


Donnenfetd Nell 




4 


2009 


Johnson, Anne 




4 


2009 


Kane Richard M Jr 


X 


4 


2009 


Keeter Terri 




4 


2009 


McBurney Michelle 




4 


2009 


McClung Michael 


X 


4 


2009 


Moynihan, John 


X 


4 


2009 


Nugent Robert 




4 


2009 


Phelan John V IV 


X 


4 


2009 


Poska Matthew 




4 


2009 


Sarafini-Foley Phyllis 


X 


4 


2009 


Sheehan Neil G 


X 


4 


2009 


Vaucher, Catherine M 


X 


4 


2009 


Paster, Glenn P 


X 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING November 1 0, 2008 Attendance: 201 



Pre 


Exp. Name 




5 


2011 Akim, Marta 




5 


201 1 Belhumeur. Cynthia Hatch 


X 


5 


2011 Belhumeur, R. Thomas 


X 


5 


2011 Carangelo, Lisa 




5 


2011 Forman Amy 


X 


5 


2011 Graham. David 


X 


5 


201 1 Grant, Kenneth 




5 


2011 Hartmann.Jill 




5 


2011 Hennessey, William F 


X 


5 


2011 Jaffe, Sharon Tripolsky 




5 


2011 Nellis. Veeder C 


X 


5 


2011 Patkin, Randall 


X 


5 


2011 




5 


2011 Rossman Neil 




5 


2011 Shore Geraldine 




5 


2011 Zarlnsky, Irma W Dr 


X 


5 


2011 Garden, John 




5 


2011 Fletcher, Mary Ellen 


X 


5 


2010 Bernstein, Neil 


X 


5 


2010 Caplan. Edward 


X 


5 


2010 Carr, Heather 




5 


2010 Devlin, Michael K 




5 


2010 Vanderburg, Joanne 




5 


2010 O'Neill, Thomas 


X 


5 


2010 Karwow/ski, John R 


X 


5 


2010 Rooks, Ruth 


X 


5 


2010 Pye, Darlene 




5 


2010 Vatcher, Howard 


X 


5 


2010 Rogers, Roberta C 


X 


5 


2010 Sneirson, Gerald 


X 


5 


2010 Sullivan, Jill 


X 


5 


2010 Talkov, Roger 


X 


5 


2010 Vanderburg, Linso 


X 


5 


2010 Zeller, David E 


X 


5 


2010 Zeller, Virginia 


X 


5 


2010 Patkin, Marjorie 




5 


2009 Callahan, Michael 


X 


5 


2009 Cerra Anthony J 


X 


5 


2009 Chapman, Randy 


X 


5 


2009 Connolly Loretta 


X 


5 


2009 Forman, Adam 


X 


5 


2009 Garner Ronald 




5 


2009 Hodgkin, Doreen L 


X 


5 


2009 Hyman, Merle 


X 


5 


2009 Keller, Ellen Long 


X 


5 


2009 Lawler, Jack 


X 


5 


2009 Lawler, Sami 


X 


5 


2009 Lipson Philip 


X 


5 


2009 Rubin, Gayle 


X 


5 


2009 Mazow, Robert 


X 


5 


2009 Steinman, Roy H 




5 


2009 Van dam David S 


X 


5 


2009 Weiner, Lawrence J 


X 


5 


2009 Wilson, Catherine E 





105 

I 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING November 1 0. 2008 Attendance: 201 



Pre 


Exp. Name 




6 


201 1 Baker, Robert A 


X 


6 


2011 Dembowski, Claire C 


X 


6 


201 1 DeVellis. Daniel D 


X 


6 


201 1 Driscoll, Thomas H Jr. Esq 


X 


6 


2011 Folta, Rand 


X 


6 


2011 Frisch, Peter 


X 


6 


2011 Goldman, Jeff 


X 


6 


201 1 Levenson, Paul E Esq 


X 


6 


2011 Paster Ruth 




6 


201 1 Paster, Marc 




6 


2011 Ryan, William 


X 


6 


2011 Sackett, Shelley A 




6 


2011 Shutzer, Carole B 


X 


6 


201 1 Shutzer, Kenneth B 


X 


6 


201 1 Tennant, Cynthia P 


X 


6 


201 1 Yaeger. Dan 


X 


6 


2011 Yaeger, Lisa L 


X 


6 


2011 Hickey, Lisa A 


X 


6 


2010 Beermann, Jack M 




6 


2010 Block Lawrence S 


X 


6 


2010 Block, Ina-Lee 


X 


6 


2010 Walker, Eric 


X 


6 


2010 Drucas, Chris 


X 


6 


2010 Gold, Anne W 


X 


6 


2010 Goldman, Martin C 


X 


6 


2010 Jacobs, Susan 


X 


6 


2010 Locke, Judith E 


X 


6 


2010 Merkle, Cynthia 




6 


2010 O'Hare, Mary Michael 


X 


6 


2010 Pelletier, Maria 




6 


2010 Pitman, Martha 




6 


2010 Rotner, Philip 


X 


6 


2010 Seligman, Edward 


X 


6 


2010 Burke, Scott 




6 


2010 Witt, Sherri L. 




6 


2010 Burgess, Sue 


X 


6 


2009 Belkin, Sylvia B 


X 


6 


2009 Carroll, William 




6 


2009 Cronin, Michael 


X 


6 


2009 Doherty-Healy Mary 




6 


2009 Eriich Norman 


X 


6 


2009 Gupta, Mary Kelly 


X 


6 


2009 Healey, Thomas J 




6 


2009 Kane John C. Jr 


X 


6 


2009 Kane, Susan 


X 


6 


2009 Horwitz Kravtin Patricia 


X 


6 


2009 Levenson, Sheryl 


X 


6 


2009 Markarian, Joe 


X 


6 


2009 Poster, Eugene L 


X 


6 


2009 Rotner, Kim 


X 


6 


2009 Ryan, Daniel 


X 


6 


2009 Ryan, Mary Ann 


X 


6 


2009 Walsh Kerin 




6 


2009 Whitman, Andrew S 


X 



106 




The TovVn of Swampscott 
Town Warrant 
April 28, 2009 



SS. 



To either of the constables of the Town of Swampscott 



GREETINGS: 

In the name of the Commonwealth you are hereby required to notify and warn the inhabitants of 
said town who are qualified to vote in elections and town affairs to vote at: 



Precinct One 
Precinct Two 
Precinct Three 
Precinct Four 
Precinct Five 
Precinct Six 



Clarke School 
Clarke School 

First Church Congregational 
First Church Congregational 
Swampscott Middle School 
Swampscott Middle School 



Norfolk Avenue 
Norfolk Avenue 
Monument Avenue 
Monument Avenue 
Forest Avenue 
Forest Avenue 



on Tuesday, the twenty-eighth day of April 2009, 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. for the following purpose: 



To choose a Moderator for one (1) year 

To choose a member for the Board of Selectmen for three (3) years 

To choose a member for the Board of Assessors for three (3) years 

To choose a member for the School Committee for three (3) years 

To choose a member for the Trustees of the Public Library for three (3) years 

To choose a member for the Board of Health for three (3) years 

To choose a member for the Planning Board for five (5) years 

To choose a member for the Planning Board for three (3) years 

To choose a member for the Housing Authority for five (5) years 



To choose Town Meeting Members in each of the six (6) precincts filling any three (3) year vacant seats 
with the highest vote getters, filling any two (2) year vacant seats with the next highest vote getters, and 
filling any one (1) year vacant seats with the next highest vote getters. 



At tiie close of the election the meeting will adjourn to Monday, May 4, 2009 at 7: 15 p.m. at 
Swampscott High School, 200 Essex Street, Swampscott, MA. 




107 



Annual Town Election 
April 28, 2009 



10,150 Registered Voters 
5% voter turnout 



Total Registered Voters 1917 1385 1648 1706 1694 1800 _ 

Prec.l Prec.2 Prec.3 Prec.4 Prec.5 Prec.6 -totals 



Moderator 
















Blanks 


45 


30 


28 


58 


48 


23 


232 


Martin C. Goldman 


46 


51 


47 


75 


49 


47 


315 


Write-Ins/All Others 





1 


1 


5 








7 


Total 


91 


82 


76 


138 


97 


70 


554 


Board of Selectmen 
















Blanks 


39 


23 


30 


56 


33 


19 


200 


Matthew W. Strauss 


51 


57 


44 


81 


64 


51 


348 


Write-ins/All Others 


1 


2 


2 


1 








6 


Total 


91 


82 


76 


138 


97 


70 


554 


Board of Assessors 
















Blanks 


10 


3 


5 


9 


11 


10 


48 


Connie E. Goudreau 


25 


34 


30 


47 


24 


26 


186 


Linda L. Paster 


56 


45 


41 


82 


62 


34 


320 


Write-ins/All Others 























Total 


91 


82 


76 


138 


97 


70 


554 


School Committee 
















Blanks 


44 


27 


29 


48 


43 


26 


217 


Jacqueline (Jackie)Kinney 


47 


55 


47 


88 


54 


44 


335 


Write-ins/All Others 











2 








2 


Total 


91 


82 


76 


138 


97 


70 


554 


Library Trustee 
















Blanks 


43 


29 


29 


50 


41 


25 


217 


John KarwowskI 


48 


53 


47 


88 


56 


45 


337 


Write-ins/All Others 























Total 


91 


82 


76 


138 


97 


70 


554 



108 



Annual Town Election 
April 28. 2009 



Total Registered Voters 

Prec.1 Prec.2 Prec.3 Prec.4 Prec.5 Prec.6 Totals 



Doaru OT neaiin ■ , - 
















tJianKS 


oo 


OR 




AR 








iNcison ivessier 


OO 








□0 


Ho 




VA/rifrA Irto/AII Ofhorc 


u 


n 

u 






u 


u 


n 


1 Olal 






7fi 


1 oo 




70 




DIanninn Rrkarrl—'^ VI? 

rianniny DOaru""0 i r\ 


















4.7 


oo 


OO 


fi1 


ou 


ou 




rairiCK A, J ones 




'to 


^0 


77 


47 


An 




Writo Inc/AII Othorc 




•i 
1 


n 


n 

u 




n 
u 


■ 1 


Total 


91 


82 


76 


138 


97 


70 


554 


Planning Board-3 YR 
















Blanks 


44 


30 


32 


56 


44 


29 


235 


Angela Ippolito 


47 


51 


44 


82 


53 


41 


318 


Wrile-ins/Ali Others 





1 














1 


Total 


91 


82 


76 


138 


97 


70 


554 


Housing Authority 
















Blanks 


42 


28 


27 


59 


36 


23 


215 


James L. Hughes 


49 


54 


49 


79 


61 


47 


339 


Write-ins/All Others 























Total 


91 


82 


76 


138 


97 


70 


554 



109 



Annual Town Election 
April 28, 2009 



nrbwn Meeting Members 




Precinct 1 


Total 


Blanks 


1383 


Christopher Miles 


39 


Patricia Finlay 


39 


Maryalice Johnson 


44 


Sally Powell 


A A 

44 


Cynthia Shannon 


A e 

45 


Lee Bartlett-Genest 


A ^ 

43 


James G. Lombard 


A A 

44 


Neil Montague 


A A 

44 


Sheila Kearney 


45 


Gary McMann 


8 


Victoria Pulos 


8 


Jorge A. Briones, Jr 


6 


Digna Scott 


6 


Maria Karametsopoulos 


3 


Todd Pierce 


3 


Robert Serino 


3 


John Cassidy 


2 


Douglas Mentuck 


2 


Eileen Green 


1 


Alice Griffin 


1 


Raymond Patalano 


1 


Write-ins/All Others 


6 


Total 


1820 


Town Meeting Members 




Precinct 2 


. „ , . 

Total 


Blanks 


981 


Kristen Vogel 


43 


Leah Ryan 


46 


Rebecca Greene 


38 


Elizabeth Belkin Zamansky 


35 


John Ruggiero 


39 


John M. Vogel 


39 


Joseph P. Crimmins 


41 


Wayne Spritz 


33 


Lisa Carrigan Bacik 


36 


Edward Mulvey 


45 


David Whelan 


43 


Gregg "J" Hamel 


33 


George E. Chaisson 


42 


Stephen R. Hunt 


37 


Joshua A. Strauss 


■T 

1 


George Morris 


4 


Edward Palleschi 


3 


Mark Casella 


2 


Ellen Chaisson 


2 


Write-Ins/All Others 


9 


Total 


1558 



110 



Annual Town Election 
April 28, 2009 



Town Meeting Members 
'Precinct 3 


total 1 


Blanks 


1026 


Jan DePaolo 


41 


Maryann Davey 


31 


Thomas F. Welch 


37 


Karen Donaher 


39 


Tara Gallagher 


37 


Sandra Moltz 


37 


Patricia (Pat) Cardenas 


32 


Denis Pilotte 


34 


Thelma (Bunny) Young Meister 


39 


Loring B. Lincoln, Jr. 


32 


David Weaver 


40 


Evan Moss 


7 


Donna O'Keefe Champagne 


2 


Patricia Jones 


2 


Catherine Esteverena 1 


George Fitzhenry 




John Hilario 




Linda Lundstrom 1 | 


Richard Smith 




Stephen Turner 




Write-ins/All Others 


2 


Total 


1444 



Town Meeting Members 




Precinct 4 


Total ' " 


Blanks 


1482 


Catherine Vaucher 


75 


Richard M. Kane, Jr. 


69 


Thomas R. Dawley 


67 


Theresa (Terri) Keeter 


53 


Phyllis Serafini-Foley 


55 


John Moynihan 


64 


Rachel B. Brown 


55 


Neil G. Sheehan 


57 


Michael McClung 


58 


Kathleen M. Greehan 


57 


John Phelan, IV 


73 


Jacqueline (Jackie) Kinney 


61 


Neil D. Donnenfeld 


55 


Linda L. Paster 


84 


John Callahan 


61 


Naomi Dreeben 


12 


Nanette R. Fridman 


12 


Henry Resler 


6 


Write-Ins/All Others 


28 


Total 


2484 



111 



Annual Town Election 
April 28, 2009 



Town Meeting IViembers 

Precinct 5'^=>3i&&i.i5igSiiiIil- total 



Blanks 


1217 


David S. Van Dam 


41 


Angela Ippolito 


40 


Roy H. Steinman 


35 


Ellen M. Long Keller 


32 


Anthony W. Cerra, Jr. 


35 


Jack Lawler 


34 


Philip D. Lipson 


29 


Adam P. Forman 


41 


Doreen L. Hodgkin 


31 


Lawrence Weiner 


33 


Sami Lawler 


30 


William L. Wollerscheid 


44 


George Rooks 


36 


Merle Hyman 


37 


Randy S. Chapman 


36 


Gayle Rubin 


37 


Michael F. Callahan 


35 


Robert Mazow 


4 


Jay Epstein 


3 


Write-ins/All Others 


13 


Total 


1843 4^ 


Town Meeting Members 

Precinct 6 total 1 


Blanks 


810 


Michael Cronin 


22 


Richard Jakious 


24 


John Kane 


24 


Daniel Ryan 


26 


Mary Kelley Gupta 


25 


Norman Eriich 


24 


Patricia Kravtin Horwitz 


25 


Sheryl Levenson 


24 


Eugene L. Poster 


24 


Mary A. Ryan 


30 


Kim Rotner 


32 


Sylvia B. Belkin 


30 


Laurier Beaupre 


24 


Thomas J. Healey 


23 


Andrew S. Whitman 


31 


Joseph Markarian 


29 


Susan Kane 


27 


Jonathan Leamon 


2 


Write-ins/All Others 


4 


Total 


1260 



112 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 




Wednesday, May 6, 2009 

8:00 P.M. 
Swampscott High School 
200 Essex Street 
Swampscott, Massachusetts 

Warrant Report 



113 



2009 SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 



Return of Service 

Dear Sirs/ Madams: 

Pursuant to the within warrant to be directed, I have notified the inhabitants of the Town 
of Swampscott, qualified to vote in elections and in town affairs by posting an attested 
copy thereof at the Town Administration Building, at the Post Office and at least two 
public and conspicuous places in each precinct in the Town, and at or in the vicinity of 
the Swampscott Railroad Station. Said posting was done on April 22, 2009 and not less 
than fourteen (14) days before the date appointed for said meeting. 

Attest: Paul Minsky 
Constable of Swampscott 

Mailing of Warrants 

The Warrant for the Special Town Meeting was mailed to Town Meeting Representatives 
on April 16, 2009. Copies of the warrant were made available, free of charge, for any 
interested person at the Town Administration Building. 

Notice of Special Town Meeting 

To the Town Meeting members: 

Notice is hereby given in accordance with Article II, Section 2, of the Bylaws of the 
Town of Swampscott that a Special Town Meeting will be held on Wednesday, May 6, 
2009, beginning at 8:00 p.m. in the Swampscott High School Auditorium located at 200 
Essex Street. Moderator Martin C. Goldman will preside. 

Susan J. Duplin 
Town Clerk 

Meeting Certifications 

The Special Town Meeting of May 6, 2009 was called to order at 9:00 p.m. in the 
Swampscott High School Auditorium located at 200 Essex Street with the necessary 
quorum being present (163). At 10:15 p.m. it was voted, unanimously, to dissolve the 
Special Town Meeting. 

Attendance: 

For the Special Town Meeting attendance, by precinct, see the list at the end of this 
report. 



May 6, 2009 Special Town Meeting Minutes 

114 



Town Meeting Action 



Article 1. To see if the Town will appropriate the sum of four hundred fifty thousand 
dollars ($450,000.00) to pay the cost to develop site plans and architectural drawings for 
a new police station on town-owned property located at 531 Humphrey Street, 
Swampscott. To fund this appropriation, the Town Treasurer, with the approval of the 
Board of Selectmen, is authorized to issue notes, or bonds, in accordance with M.G.L. 
Chapter 44, Section 7 and other applicable statutes. Funds appropriated for the purposes 
set out herein shall be expended by a Police Station Building Committee, the formation 
of which shall be authorized by Town Meeting, 

Sponsored by C.C. Merkle, et al. 



Article 1 
Unanimous Vote 
5/6/09 STM 



Article 2. To see if the Town will vote to create a Police Station Building Committee 
with seven (7) members, of which one (1) shall be the Chief of Police, three (3) others 
shall be appointed by the Board of Selectmen and the remaining three (3) members shall 
be appointed by the Town Moderator. Members of the committee appointed by the 
Selectmen and the Moderator shall be residents of Swampscott who have knowledge and 
experience relevant to the charge and purposes of said Building Committee. The 
Building Committee shall oversee the police station design project which charge shall 
include, but not necessarily be limited to, involvement in selection of an architect, 
development of site and building design specifications, formulation of construction and 
project cost estimates and taking any other action related thereto. The Building 
Committee shall complete its charge and present its report, which shall include 
recommendations for further Town action, to a Special Town Meeting to be held no later 
than November 15, 2009. The Building Committee shall continue, as constituted, to 
carry out any action authorized by Town Meeting relative to the new police station 
project. 

Sponsored by C.C. Merkle, et al. 

Voted Article 2 as amended. 
Standing Vote: 98, yes; 89 no. 
5/6/09 STM 



May 6, 2009 Special Town Meeting Minutes 



115 



Hereof fail not and make return of this Wan ant with your doings thereon at the time and 
place of said meeting. 

Given under our hand this 21st day of April, 2009 




116 



May 6, 2009 Special Town Meeting 
Pre Name [ May 6, 2009 



Abrams, Alan 


[ 


Adams, Ryan 




; Baldacci, Richard R 


;X 


i Bartlett-Genest Lee 


■X 


: Bates, Wallace T. 


]^ 


Blonder, Jeffrey S 




Briones Jorge A Jr 


i'v 


[Buchanan, Susan 


■]X 


1 n Ai ti 

1 Byron-Adams Michelle 




iCassidy, John 


X 


Chavez, Robert 


: X 

1. 


Cresta, Gino A Jr 


|X 


Dandreo, Robert 




Davis Jeremy 


X 


DiPietro, Ross 




Finlay Patricia 


X 


1 Green Eileen 


JX 


; Griffin, Alice 


X 


|Hartmann, Eric 


X 


;Hartmann, Marianne 


X 


Hayes, Jeanne 


i 


Hubauer, Shawn 




Hyde, Sally A 




Hyde, William R Sr 




Johnson Maryallce 




iKarametsopouIos Maria 


X 


Kearney Sheila 


;X 


Kessler, Nelson 


X 


LeBlanc Dean 


X 


1 Lombard James 


iX 


Marston, Denise 


;X 


iMcMann Gary 


:X 


1 Mentuck Douglas 


X 


Miles, Chris 


iX 


'Miles, Denise 




Montague, Neil 


:X 


IPatalano, Raymond 


X 


iPatrikis, Theodore A. 


X 


iPicariello, John A 


X 


i Picariello, Lawrence 


X 


: Pierce Todd 




j Powell Sally 


X 


Pulos, Victoria 


X 


1 Rizzo, Carole 


X 


; Rooks, Norma H 


X 


Schultz, Hugh (Jim) 


.X 


: Scott, Digna 


: X 


Senno, Michael A 




Senno, Robert 


:X 


Shannon Cynthia 


;X 


Shannon, Collin 




Speranza, Frances 


:X 


Whittler, Douglas 


ix 


5/6/09 STM Attendance 





117 



May 6, 2009 Special Town Meeting 



Pre \ Name 


Mav6 2009 


o 
Z 


Amore, Mninony 




o 




X 





DdCiKi Lioo oarriydii 




o 
c. 


DUWc^il, UdVIU 


X 


o 


^ o a n 1 o n A 1 1 A 

L/drricruri, Jdii^ii m 


X 


o 


OCilUII, IVlCti r\ r\ 


X 




Odbc;lid, IVIdlf\ 






OlldlooUfl tllJoiI 


X 


o 

£. 




X 


O 
£. 


wUU)Jc;i , r\UUli 1 






L/nrnrnins josspn 


X 




■ourry, ivianna 


■X 


O 


; L/Ullt?l Ly, JUIIII J 


X 


o 


ni inn liiHith F 




o 


CIOI lit;! , 1 dl llo 


i X 


o 




X 

1 


o 


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X 




: ncuen, uonaiu 




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neDerx, janei 


! X 


o 


: nuni oiepnen 




o 


!jdC/t\our], i-urc;ric 


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. 




lar'W'Qnn \A/illiam 

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o 


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X 


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iviaiv^^.'Ut ivicii 11 ici u> 


X 


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MrHiinh Dnnn^i 




o 




:X 


o 


jIVIUIIIo OcUiyc; 




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IVIUiVcy CUWdtU 






iiviurpny, Drjan o 




o 


■iNewndii, Linua m 


yv 


o 


1 INc^WI ldll» vVdllci 


-yv 


9 


naiiescDi, cQwaru 




9 


."iriKenon, L/on 


V 


9 


inlulldli, ivlluildli^l 


y 


9 


1 rAdll loLlI ICf rdllluld rvdldllldo 


Y 

. yv 


2 


Rpardnn Fllpn M 




Cm, 


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9 




!x 


9 


1 Rnconhom refill 
' r\UoUI lUcI y , OdlJ 


X 




' Ri inniArn Inhn 


X 

- yv 




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; rxycll 1 Lcdl I 


x 




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X 

yv 


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9 


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X 

: 'V 


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2 


i \A/hp|pn Mirh^pl 

iVVIIClldi, IVIILfllClC^I 


X 


2 


jWhelan David Jr 




2 


iZamansky Elizabeth Belkin 
5/6/09 STM Attendance 


X 



118 



May 6, 2009 Special Town Meeting 



Pre Name 




may O, ZUUSj 


3 


Barden, Gary 


' V 

: A 




3 


iBogardus, Deborah 






o 
o 


iBreen, Kevin F 






o 
O 


tjreen, Leslie a 






3 


Cardenas Patricia 


Y 

A 




3 


Cnampagne-O Keere Donna 


V 
A 




3 


Colella, Angelo 






3 


I Colella, Sandra 






o 
o 


L/Oietii, jonn m 






3 


'Cormier, Kathleen 


Y 
A 




3 


Dandreo, Daniel Jill 






o 
O 


Davey Maryann 


■V 

lA 




3 


Davis, Deborah 


' Y 
A 




3 


DePaolo Jan 


V 
A 




3 


Domelowicz, Joseph J. Jr 


V 
A 




o 


1 Donaher Karen 


V 

, A 




o 


1 uonaner, isevin 


' Y 
A 




3 


Driscoll, Anne 


.A 




Q 

o 


■ Eldridge, Barbara F 


V 
A 




3 


Eldndge, Scott 


Y 

' A 




3 


Esteverena Catherine 


,A 




3 


Fitzhenry George 


A 




3 


Fox, Deborah 






Q 

o 


rraser, uana 






o 
o 


Frenkel, Lenora 






3 


Frenkel, Richard 


V 
A 




o 


ballagner, Tara 


■ V 
A 




3 


Grimes, Daniel 


:A 




Q 
O 


Hilario Joan 


V 

: X 




Q 
O 


Jones, Patricia A 


' V 
! A 




o 
o 


Kelleher, Martha G 


: A 




1 

o 


iLegere, Carol 






O 


Lincoln Loring B Jr 


■ A 




o 
>3 


, Lincoln, iviaria r 


i V 




Q 


: LUKe oeraiQ 


' Y 
: A 




o 
o 


;Lundstrom Linda 


Y 

: A 




o 
O 


Magee, Kathleen 






3 


Meister Thelma Young 


A 




o 
O 


Moltz Sandra 


■ \# 
A 




o 
o 


Moss, Connie 


V 
A 




3 


Moss, Evan 






3 


Penyack, Jonathan 


A 




3 


Perry, Gerard 


A 




Q 
O 


rilotte Denis 


A 




o 
o 


Sachs-Freeman, Barbara 






o 
O 


omaii, hred 






o 

o 


omin r\icnara 






o 


A A 1 1 ■ A A aA A A 

bpeiiios, Peter A 


' Y 
A 




•5 
O 


Thomsen, Maureen 


1 A 




O 


Turner, Stephen 






3 


! Weaver David 


' V 
. A 




-J 


iVvcUblcl, Ivldiy 






3 


Welch Thomas 


: A 




3 


IWright, Suzanne 
5/6/09 STM Attendance 


i'x 





119 



May 6, 2009 Special Town Meeting 
Pre Name [ May 6, 2009 



4 


baKer, janei in 


Y 
A 


A 

4 


baisama, josepn j 


" V 
.A 


4 


baraen, /viarc 


A 


4 


.Drown lAdUIICl 




A 

4 


Brown, Andrew 


. A 


A 

4 


lUaiianan jonn 


A 


A 

4 


uunningnam, r\eiiy 


- A 


A 

4 


Dansdill, Martha 




A 

4 


uawiey i nomas 


A 


4 


r»Q^I->rll<^ ^/lor\/ Ul 

ueuniiio, iviary n 


V 
A 


4 


uiivienio, William k 


■A 


4 


uoneian, Kooen t 




4 


uonnenieiQ Neii 


"V 
; A 


/I 
4 


ureeoen, iNaomi 


A 


A 

4 


Drummond, Brian 


A 


4 


Drummond, Ellen M 


' Y 
:A 


4 


Faico, Michael 


A 


4 


rriarnan, iNaneue k 


A 


4 

*T 


. OUIUIIIdll, II lb 


' Y 


A 






4 


oreenan, rsainieen ivi 


'■ Y 


/I 
4 


nowe, unnsiopner 




4 


1 Hughes, Nancy 


Y 
A 


4, 
*f 


■ 111 rrYi o lor 
iJUriilca, Jcl 


• Y 
A 


A 

4 


i\ane Kicnara m jt 


■ Y 

A 


/l 


rVctjlcl 1 CI n 


Y 
A 


'f 


r\inney jacc|iJ6jin6 ^jacKiej 


Y 

; A 




r\rari, r\icnara 


Y 
A 


/I 

M' 


r\rippt;i luuri , cuwdru vv. or 


Y 
A 


A 
H 


Lc^cif Jcdiliic 


i. Y 
: A 


A 
H 


. UUI U, \Da\ y 


■ Y 
: A 


A 

*-T 




Y 

' A 


A 
4 


iivicv'iLJny iviicna6i 


: Y 

A 


A 
H 


; IVIUCI loJ ley, JUlHl 1 


•' Y 
'A 


A 
4 


; iviciNerney, L^yninia 


■• Y 
A 


A 

4 


iMeninno, Christine 


A 


4 


:Moynihan, John 




4 


O'Brien, Laurie 


; V 
A 


/I 
4 


I raster, i_inoa i_ 


i Y 
;A 


A 
H 


Pholan Inhn \/ l\/ 


■ Y 
: A 


A 


' Ph^lan Inhn \/ III 
i~llclclll, JUiHI V III 


Y 

•A 




1 r UWcll, /Al 1 ly 


^- Y 
:. A 


A 
4 


:r\eayan, jonn 




/I 
4 


ircesier, nenry 


i Y 
: A 


A 

*T 


, Odl al 11 ll-iUltsy 1 iiyillo 


1 Y 

. A 


4 

H" 


OI Idl Idl Idl 1, rdlllUld U 


Y 

1 A 


4 


.oneenan Neii o 


; Y 
; A 


4 
4 


oomtJi, ividiydrci 


i Y 
A 


4 


lOione, iviyron o 




4 


iVdUUllcl, V^dUICflllC Ivl 


i Y 
; A 


4 


Wakh Karvn 1 k 
.vvdioii, iNdiyn i-iA 


r Y 

A 


4 


: Watson Brian T 


X 


4 


iWithrow, Marysusan Buckley 


X 


4 


Wynne, Katie 


X 



5/6/09 STM Attendance 



120 



May 6, 2009 Special Town Meeting 



Pre i Name 




5 


'Akim, Marta 




5 


i Belriumeur, Cynthia Hatch 


X 





Belhumeur, R. Thomas 


X 


5 


Bernstein, Neil 


X 


5 


Callahan, Michael 




5 


Caplan, Edward 


iX 


c 



uarangeio, Lisa 


:X 


c 
U 


oaraen, jonn 


!■ V 

:,A 


5 


iCarr, Heather 


i' 





; iw/crra Aninony j 


: X 


O 


Chapman, Randy 




O 


Devlin, Michael K 


X 


5 


Epstein, Jay 


X 


5 


Fletcher, Mary Ellen 


X 


5 


Forman Amy 




5 


Forman, Adam 


1. 





uranam, uavia 




CD 


Grant, Kenneth 


: X 


O 


nanmann, jiii 


i X 





; nennessey, vviiiiam r 


: X 


c 



inOQyKin, uoreen l 


i X 





! Hyman, Merle 


X 


c 
JD 


Ippolito, Angela 


X 


5 


Jane, Sharon Tripolsky 


X 


5 


Karwowski, John R 




O 


rveiier, tiien Long 




5 


Lawler, Jack 


: X 


5 


Lawler, Sami 


X 





Upson Philip 







1 iviazow Kooen c 


X 





;Neiiis, Veeder u 


JX 





1 u rMeiii, 1 nomas 







iraiKin, Marjorie 


X 


c 
D 


jraiKin, Kanoaii 




5 


Pye, Darlene 


:X 


5 


! Rogers, Roberta C 


X 





Rooks George 


X 





Rooks, Ruth 


X 





Rossman Neil 




c 
O 


KUDin, uayie 


X 




Shore Geraldine 







oneirson, oeraio 


X 





Stein man, Roy H 







ouiiivan, JIII 


X 


c 



1 aiKov, Koger 


X 


5 


Van Dam David S 


X 





Vanderburg, Joanne 


ix 





Vanderburg, Linso 


X 


c 



vaicner, nowara 




c 



Weiner, Lawrence J 




c 

u 


vvoiierscneia, vviiiiam l 


X 


5 


Zarinsky, Irma W Dr 


X 


5 


IZeller, David E 


ix 


5 


Zeller, Virginia 


ix 



May 6, 2009 



5/6/09 STM Attendance 



121 



May 6, 2009 Special Town Meeting 



rre 


' i\ame 




IVIdy D| iCUU9 


6 


1 Baker, Robert A 






6 


iBeaupre, Laurier 






6 


iBeermann, Jack M 


: A 




6 


Belkin, bylvia B 


■ V 
. A 







diock Lawrence o 






6 


1 Block, Ina-Lee 






6 


; Burgess, Sue 






6 


; Burke, Scott 


A 




D 


iCronin, Michael 


" V 

A 




D 


iDembowski, Claire C 






6 


DeVeliis, uaniei u 


V 

:A 




6 


Driscoll, Thomas H Jr. Esq 






6 


Drucas, Chris 


A 




6 


Eriich Norman 


A 




6 


rolta, Rand 






6 


Frisch, Peter 


A 




b 


vjold, Anne w 






D 


looiaman, jen 


'■Y 






ijoiaman, ivianin o 


A 




D 


:oupia, iviary t\eiiy 


. A 




D 


Healey, Thomas J 






b 


'HIckey, Lisa A 


A 




6 


Horwitz Kravtin, Patricia 


A 




b 


Jacobs, Susan 






6 


Jakious, Richard 


' V 

:A 




b 


Kane Jonn o. Jr 


■ V 
A 




ft 

b 


Kane, Susan 


V 

A 




ft 
b 


Leamon, Jonathan 


A 




b 


Levenson, Paul E Esq 


V 

A 




b 


Levenson, Sheryl 


A 




ft 

b 


Locke, Judith E 


: A 




b 


Markarian, Joe 


.A 




b 


, Merkle, Cynthia 


A 




b 


O Hare, Mary Michael 


: V 
A 




6 


Paster Ruth 


X 




6 


Paster, Marc 


■ V 

: A 




ft 


reiieuer, rviaria 






ft 

b 


■■ Pitman, Martha 






ft 
b 


1 Poster, Eugene L 


j 




ft 
b 


\ Komer, j\im 


1 A 

1. 




ft 


! Komer, r niiip 


1 A 




ft 
b 


iKyan, uaniei 


A 




ft 

D 


Kyan, Mary Ann 






ft 
b 


i Kyan, vviiiiam 


:A 




b 


backett, bhelley A 


lA 




o 


Seligman, Edward 


>A 




ft 

b 


bnutzer, uaroie o 


'A 




b 


Shutzer, Kenneth B 


A 




b 


1 ennant, uynthia r 


X 




ft 
b 


'Walker, Eric 


|A 




ft 

D 


ivvniiman, Anorew o 


■ Y 
A 




ft 
o 




•i Y 
'A 




6 


jYaeger, Dan 


X 




6 


iYaeger, Lisa L 


X 





5/6/09 STM Attendance 



122 



2009 



Annual Town Meeting 




A TRUE COPY 



May 4, 2009 Annual Town Meeting 

, j 
MINUTES ! 

Town of Swampscott, Massachusetts 



. Susan J. Duplin 
town ClWk, Swampscott 



123 



The Town of Swampscott 
Town Warrant 
April 2009 



SS. 



To either of the Constables of the Town of Swampscott 
GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth, you are hereby required to notify and warn the inhabitants of 
said town who are qualified to vote in elections and Town affairs to vote at: 



Precinct One 
Precinct Two 
Precinct Three 
Precinct Four 
Precinct Five 
Precinct Six 



Clarke School 



Clarke School 



First Church Congregational 
First Church Congregational 
Swampscott Middle School 
Swampscott Middle School 



Norfolk Avenue 
Norfolk Avenue 
Monument Avenue 
Monument Avenue 
Forest Avenue 
Forest Avenue 



on Tuesday, the twenty-eighth day of April, 2009, from 7:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. for the following 
purpose: 



To choose a Moderator for one (1 ) 
To choose one (1 ) member for the 
To choose one (1 ) member for the 
To choose one (1) member for the 
To choose one (1 ) member for the 
To choose one (1) member for the 
To choose one (1 ) member for the 
To choose one (1) member for tiie 
To choose one (1) member for the 



year 

Board of Selectmen for three (3) years 
Board of Assessors for tiiree (3) years 
School Committee for three (3) years 
Trustees of the Public Library for tiiree (3) years 
Board of Health for three (3) years 
Planning Board for five (5) years 
Planning Board for three (3) years 
Housing Autiiority for five (5) years 



To choose Town Meeting Members in each of tiie six (6) precincts filling any three (3) year vacant seats 
with the highest vote getters, filling any two (2) year vacant seats with the next highest vote getters, and 
filling any one (1 ) year vacant seats witii tine next highest vote getters. 



At the dose of the election, \he meeting will adjoum to Monday, May 4, 2009, at 7:15 p.m. in the 
Swampscott High School Auditorium located at 200 Essex Street, Swampscott. 



124 



NOTICE OF PRECINCT CAUCUS MEETINGS 



Caucus meetings for ail Swampscott precincts have been scheduled for Monday, May 4, 2009, 
beginning at 6:45 p.m. in the Swampscott High School located at 200 Essex Street, Swampscott. Room 
assignments are as follows: 

Precinct 1 - Room TBA Precinct 4 - Room TBA 

Precinct 2 - Room TBA Precinct 5 - Room TBA 

Precinct 3 - Room TBA Precinct 6 - Room TBA 

NOTES: 

Please remember that it is YOUR responsibility to be recorded as being present with the door 
checkers prior to entering the auditorium for EACH session. Excessive absences are cause for removal 
from Town Meeting membership. Also, please remember the following: 

1 . You must wear (display) your Town Meeting identification badge at all times; 

2. Remember to use the microphones when speaking on any issue so that your comments 
may be recorded on the official transcript of the meeting and be heard by your fellow 
members in the hall and residents viewing the live cable telecast. 

Susan Duplin 
Clerk of Swampscott 



2009 ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

Return of Service for the Annual Town Meeting including the Special Town Meeting within the 
Annual Town Meeting: 

Pursuant to the within warrant to be directed, I have notified the inhabitants of the Town of 
Swanripscott, qualified to vote in elections and in town affairs, by posting an attested copy 
thereof at the Town Administration Building, at the Post Office and at least two public and 
conspicuous places in each precinct in the Town, and at or in the immediate vicinity of the 
Swampscott Railroad Station. Said posting was done on April 16, 2009 and not less than seven 
days before the date appointed for said meeting. 

Attest: PaulMinsky 
Constable of Swampscott 

Mailing of Warrants: 

The Warrants for the Annual Town Meeting were mailed to the Town Meeting Representatives 
and on April 1 6, 2009. Copies of the warrant were available, free of charge, for any interested 
person at the Town Administration Building. 



125 



NOTICE OF ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 



The Annual Town Meeting of 2009 will convene on Tuesday, April 28, 2009, with Article 1 (the Town 
Election) at 7:00 a.m. in the Town's regular polling places. At 8:00 p.m., the Town Meeting will be 
adjourned until Monday, May 4, 2009, 7:15 p.m., when it will be reconvened in the Swampscott High 
School Auditorium located at 200 Essex Street, Swampscott. 



NOTICE OF ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
MONDAY. MAY 4. 2009. 7:15 P.M. 



To the Town Meeting members: 



Notice is hereby given in accordance with Article I, Section 2, of the Bylaws of the Town of Swampscott 
that the Adjourned Annual Town Meeting will be held on Monday, May 4, 2009, beginning at 7:15 p.m. in 
the Swampscott High School Auditorium located at 200 Essex Street, Swampscott. Moderator Martin C. 
Goldman, Esquire, will preside. 

Susan J. Duplin 
Clerk of Swampscott 



Meeting Certifications: 

I hereby certify that in accordance with the adjournment of the Annual Town Meeting of April 28, 2009 
(the election) the Adjourned Annual Town Meeting (business portion) of May 4, 2009 was held in the 
Swampscott High School Auditorium located at 200 Essex Street and was called to order at 7:30 PM with 
the necessary quorum present (163). At 10:35 PM it was voted to adjourn to Wednesday, May 6, 2009. 

I hereby certify in accordance with the adjournment of May 4, 2009, the Adjourned Annual Town Meeting 
of May 6, 2009 was held in the Swampscott High School auditorium located at 200 Essex Street and was 
called to order at 7:35 PM with the necessary quorum present (163). At 10:30 p.m. it was voted, 
unanimous, to dissolve the Annual Town Meeting. 

Attendance: 

For the 2009 Annual Town Meeting attendance, by precinct, see the list at the end of this report. 



126 



TOWN MEETING ACTION 



The Return of Service was read by Town Clerk Susan J. Duplin who administered the Oath of Office to 
the newly elected Town Meeting Members. 

Rabbi David J. Meyer of Temple Emanu-EI, Marblehead was introduced and offered the invocation. 

Moderator Goldman welcomed Coach Hughes accompanied by the Swampscott Girls varsity basketball 
team. This team was the first girl's basketball team to ever win the State Championship for the Town of 
Swampscott who also had a very successful season. 

Moderator Goldman thanked all elected town officials, boards, committee members and department 
heads for their hard work and dedication to the Town. 

Moderator Goldman thanked the Capital Improvements Committee and Finance Committee for their 
diligent work thru the year that is the key success of Town Meeting, 

Moderator Goldman announced this is his last Annual Town Meeting that he will preside as Moderator. 
He stated it is not his intention to run for re-election in 2010 however he will continue to serve to the end 
of his term. This is his 21®' year as moderator which he enjoyed the wonderful opportunity to serve our 
Town who is extremely grateful for the incredible talent of residents who have volunteered to serve on all 
the committees that have been authorized by Town Meeting over the years, "What is most critical to the 
process over this period of time has been the willingness of so many residents to seive as Town Meeting 
Members and by your participation you helped make Swampscott a great place in which live". Moderator 
Goldman was then awarded a standing ovation by all. 

Sheryl Levensen, Precinct 6 Town Meeting member spoke in memory of Carl Reardon a past Town 
Meeting member and Local Afscme Union member. 

Moderator Goldman introduced State Representative Lori Ehrlich who spoke about budget meetings at 
the Legislature. 



127 



ARTICLE 2. To hear and act on the reports of Town Officials, Boards and Committees. 

Sponsored by the Board of Selectmen 

Comment: This routine Article appears every year to allow Town groups to make reports. 

A report from Andrew Maylor, Town Administrator provided Town Meeting with a 5-year financial 
forecast required by Town Charter, Section 8-2(h). 

A report from Joe Markarian of the High School Building Committee. 
MOTION made and seconded to dissolve the High School Building Committee. 
Majority Vote. 
5/4/09 ATM 

A report from Neil Bernstein of the Swampscott School Committee. 

A report from Jill Sullivan of the Town Building Oversight Committee. 

A report from Roger Talkov of the Rail to Trail Implementation Committee. 



Article 2. 
Majority Vote. 
5/4/09 ATM 



128 



ARTICLE 3. To see if Town Meeting will vote to accept, for all boards, committees or 

commissions, holding adjudicatory hearing in the Town, the provisions of Massachusetts General Laws 
Chapter 39, Sec. 23D which provides that a member of a board, committee or commission holding an 
adjudicatory hearing shall not be disqualified from voting In the matter solely due to a member's absence 
from one session of such hearing, provided that certain conditions are met and provided further that such 
acceptance shall be applicable to all adjudicatory hearings opened on or after the effective date of the 
vote taken hereunder, or take any other action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the Planning Board 

Article 3. 
Majority Vote. 
5/4/09 ATM 



ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to enter into an 

intergovernmental agreement for a period often years to provide emergency and non-emergency police, 
fire and emergency medical services dispatch with other municipalities in Essex County based on a per 
capita chargeback through the cherry sheet, or take any other action thereon. 
Sponsored by the Board of Selectmen 

The Finance Committee recommends that the Town vote to approve this Article. 

Article 4. 
Majority Vote. 
5/4/09 ATM 



ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will vote to amend its General Bylaws by adding a new article. 

Article XIV, "Registration and Enforcement of Alarm Systems", a copy of which is set forth in Appendix A, 
or take any other action thereon. 

Sponsored by the Chief of Police 

Comment: Refer to Appendix A for the complete text of the proposed Bylaw. 
The Finance Committee will report on this Article at Town Meeting. 

Article 5. 
Majority Vote. 
5/4/09 ATM 



129 



ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to amend its General Bylaws by adding a new article, 

Article XV, relative to the prohibition of public consumption of marijuana or tetrahydrocannabinol, as 
follows: 

Article XV: PUBLIC CONSUMPTION OF MARIJUANA OR TETRAHYDROCANNABINOL 

No person shall smoke, ingest, or otherwise use or consume marijuana or tetrahydrocannabinol (as defined 
in G.L. c. 94C, § 1, as amended) while in or upon any street, sidewalk, public way, footway, passageway, stairs, 
bridge, park, playground, beach, recreation area, boat landing, public building, schoolhouse, school grounds, 
cemetery, parking lot, or any other area owned by or under the control of the Town; or in or upon any bus or other 
passenger conveyance operated by a common carrier; or in any place accessible to the public. 



Any person smoking, ingesting or otherwise using or consuming marijuana or tetrahydrocannabinol in 
violation of Section 1 of this bylaw shall provide to a police officer so requesting personal identifying information, 
including their full legal name and address. Failure to provide such identifying information upon request, or 
provision of false, incorrect or otherwise invalid identifying information, shall be considered a separate violation of 
this bylaw, and any fine imposed shall be in addition to that imposed for violation of the first paragraph of this 
bylaw. 

This by-law may be enforced through any lawful means and in law or in equity including, but not limited 
to, non-criminal disposition pursuant to G.L. c. 40, § 21D, by the Board of Selectmen, the Town Administrator, or 
their duly authorized agents, or any police officer. The fine for violation of oithor tho first or second paragraph ' of 
this by - law shall b e- thr e e hundr e d dollars ($300) for e ach offense. Any penalty imposed imder this by-law shall be 
in addition to any civil penalty imposed under G.L. c. 940, § 32L. 

In case any section, paragraph or part of this bylaw is for any reason declared invalid or 
unconstitutional by any court, every other section, paragraph and part shall continue in full force and 
effect. 

Or take any action relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Chief of Police 

Article 6. 

Majority Vote as Amended 
5/4/09 ATM 



ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to amend Section 2 of Article XII of the Town By-laws 

to authorize police officers of the Town, in addition to the Board of Selectmen or its designee, to enforce 
the General By-laws of the Town using non-criminal disposition, by inserting the following underlined 
language: 

Section 2. Non-Criminal Enforcement of the By-Laws 

Non-Criminal Enforcement of the General By-Laws not set out in Section 1 above shall be as follows: 
The Board of Selectmen or their respective designee, or any police officer of the Town , is authorized to 
enforce said by-laws pursuant to MGL Chapter 40, Section 21 D. Whoever violates any provision of the 
Swampscott By-Laws may, at the discretion of the Board of Selectmen or their respective designee, or 
any police officer of the Town , be penalized by a non-criminal disposition pursuant to the MGL Chapter 40 
Section 21 D. The fines shall be the same as the fines set by the by-laws, or by state statute, state codes 
and those regulations established by the town for criminal violations. This by-law shall not apply to state 
statutes, state codes or regulations which provide for range of fines. Nothing in this section shall serve to 
waive the town's right to enforce the by-laws by criminal enforcement. (5/6/98). 
Sponsored by the Chief of Police 



Article 7. 
Majority Vote. 
5/4/09 ATM 



ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire by 

negotiation, eminent domain or other means a recreational easement on the property owned by National Grid 
Company (NGC) or other parties, said easement to be no more than ten feet wide between the present Swampscott 
train station and the Marblehead border at Seaview Avenue, Marblehead or a portion thereof that formerly hosted a 
single railroad line between the towns of Swampscott and Marblehead. The conditions set forth and numbered 1 
through 4 in the votes under Article 25 of the 2005 Annual Town Meeting and Article 21 of the 2006 Annual Town 
Meeting shall not limit the authority of the Selectmen hereunder. 

And, further to see if the Town will vote to raise, appropriate, transfer from available funds, accept gifts or 
borrow a sum of money for this purpose and any expenses related thereto and to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen to enter into all agreements and take all related actions necessary or appropriate to carry out 
this acquisition, or act or transact anything in relation thereto. 

This article is subject to the provision that no direct Town funds will be used, including funds for Town 
Counsel, unless approved by the Board of Selectmen or the funds have been granted or gifted to the 
Town pursuant to M.G.L. c. 44, section 53A, for this purpose. The condition set forth in this paragraph 
does not preclude the expenditure of indirect Town funds such as time of the Town Administrator, Town 
Engineer, procurement officer, clerical staff and the like. 

Sponsored by the Rail Trail Implementation Committee 

The Finance Committee will report on this Article at Town Meeting. 

Article 8 requires 2/3's affirmative vote to adopt 

Moderator Goldman recluses himself from Article 8 due to a conflict (abutter that will be affected 
by the taking) 

Motion made and seconded to appoint Gerry Perry as protempore/ majority vote 5/4/09 
Article 8. 

Majority Vote as amended. 
5/4/09 ATM 



132 



ARTICLE 9. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the necessary funds, by borrowing or 

othenwise, for the following projects, or take any action relative thereto. 



No. Purpose Requested Recommended 

School Department 

1 0-01 Asbestos Abatement (Middle School 1 of 3) 43.550 20,000 

Department of Public Works 

10-02 Sewer Jetter 185,000 185,000 

10-03 Snow Blades 20,000 20,000 

10-04 Pumping Station Lift Improvements 25,000 25,000 

10-05 Rebuilding Roads 150,000 150,000 

10-06 Playground and Open Space Improvements 75.000 75,000 

10-07Public Buildings Maintenance 150.000 100,000 

Police Department 

10-08 Ballistic Vests 30,000 30.000 
Fire Department 

10-09 Fire Alarm Replacement (Wired) 25,000 25.000 
Technology 

10-10 Upgrades Town-wide 50.000 50.000 

Total 753.550 680.000 

Each numbered item will be considered a separate appropriation. The budgeted amount may be spent 
only for the stated purpose. 

Sponsored by the Capital Improvement Committee 

Comment: The above projects were recommended for funding in FY201 by the Capital 
Improvement Committee (CIC). Refer to Appendix E for the complete CIC report. 

The Finance Committee will report on this Article at Town Meeting. 

Article 9 requires 2/3's affirmative vote if borrowing 



Article 9. 
Unanimous Vote 
5/4/09 ATM 



133 



ARTICLE 10. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the necessary funds, by borrowing or 

otherwise, for the following projects, or take any action relative thereto. 



No. Purpose Requested Recommended 

School Department 

10-11 Wrestling Site (Middle School-Townwide use) 27,000 
Police Department 

10-12 Construct New Holding Cells 860,000 

10-13 Lead Abatement 27,000 

10-14 Two Cruisers 60,000 

Fire Department 550,000 
10-15 Engine Truck 

30,000 

Library 

10-16 Technology/Copier 
Senior Center 

10-17 New Van 55,000 

Total 1,609,000 

Each numbered item will be considered a separate appropriation. The budgeted amount may be spent 
only for the stated purpose. 

Sponsored by the Capital Improvement Committee 

Comment: The above projects were not recommended for funding in FY2010 by the Capital 
Improvement Committee. 

The Finance Committee will report on this Article at Town Meeting. 
Article 10 requires 2/3's affirmative vote if borrowing 



Article 10 

Indefinitely Postponed 
Majority Vote 
5/4/09 ATM 



134 



ARTICLE 11. To see if the Town will vote to create a Police Station Building Committee with seven (7) 
members, of which one (1 ) shall be the Chief of Police, three (3) others shall be appointed by the Board 
of Selectmen and the remaining three (3) members shall be appointed by the Town Moderator. Members 
of the committee appointed by the Selectmen and the Moderator shall be residents of Swampscott who 
have knowledge and expertise relevant to the charge and purposes of said Building Committee. The 
purpose of said committee shall be to assess the feasibility of funding, designing and constructing a new 
police station. The Building Committee shall complete its charge and present its report, which shall 
include recommendations for further Town action, to a Town Meeting to be held no later than the next 
Annual Town Meeting. 

Sponsored by the Board of Selectmen 

The Finance Committee will report on this Article at Town Meeting. 



Motion made and seconded to lay on the table Article 11/Unanimous vote 5/4/09 ATM 
Motion made and seconded to take from the table Article 11/Majority Vote 5/6/09 ATM 



Article 11 

Indefinitely postponed 
Unanimous Vote 
5/6/09 ATM 



ARTICLE 12. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate $233,831 to repair, construct or 

reconstruct streets, together with all necessary work incidental thereto, including engineering, in 
conjunction with the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, under General Laws, Chapter 90 or otherwise; 
and to transfer for this purpose any unexpended balance of appropriations voted for this purpose at prior 
Town Meetings, or take any action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the Director of Public Works 

Comment: The purpose of this article is to appropriate monies approved by the Legislature 
for highway and traffic safety projects as approved by the Massachusetts Highway Department. 
The monies may be spent for more than one year. 

The Finance Committee recommends that the Town vote to approve this Article. 



Article 12 

Majority Vote as amended 
5/4/09 ATM 



135 



ARTICLE 13. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Job Classification and Salary Plan of the 

Personnel Board Bylaws, as it applies to those positions not covered by collective bargaining 
agreements, and appropriate the necessary funds, by borrowing or otherwise, as recommended by the 
Personnel Board, or take any action relative thereto. The proposed modified classification schedule can 
be found in Appendix E. 

Sponsored by the Personnel Board 

Comment: This article will increase the salaries of those positions covered under the 
Personnel Board Bylaws by two and one-half percent (2.5%). 

The Finance Committee will report on this Article at Town Meeting. 



Article 13 

Indefinitely Postponed 
Majority Vote 
5/4/09 ATM 



ARTICLE 14. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Personnel Board Bylaws, other than 

wage and salary classification, as recommended by the Personnel Board, or take any action relative 
thereto. 

Sponsored by the Personnel Board 

Comment: This article allows the Town to adopt changes to the Personnel By-Laws. New 
positions created on or after this date will not be eligible for a cost of living increase until July 
2009. 

The Finance Committee will report on this Article at Town Meeting. 



Article 14 

Indefinitely postponed 
Majority Vote 
5/4/09 ATM 



ARTICLE 15. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Personnel Board By-Laws so as to 

reclassify certain existing positions, as recommended by the Personnel Board, or take any action relative 
thereto. The proposed modified classification schedule can be found in Appendix E. 
Sponsored by the Personnel Board 

Comment: This article allows the Town to reclassify positions covered by the Personnel By- 
Laws. 

The Finance Committee will report on this Article at Town Meeting. 



Article 15 

Indefinitely postponed 
Majority Vote 
5/4/09 ATM 



136 



ARTICLE 1 6. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the funds necessary, by borrowing or 

otherwise, to fund and implement the collective bargaining agreements between the Board of Selectmen 
and the various unions under the Board of Selectmen for the fiscal year beginning July 1 , 2009, or take 
any action relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Board of Selectmen 

Comment: The purpose of this Article is to fund the collective bargaining agreements. 

The Finance Committee recommends that the Town vote to Indefinitely postpone this 
Article. 



Article 16 

Indefinitely postponed 
Majority Vote 
5/4/09 ATM 



ARTICLE 17. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the funds necessary, by borrowing or 

otherwise, to fund and implement the collective bargaining agreements between the School Department 
personnel and the Town, which includes, but is not limited to, teachers, school administrators, custodians, 
cafeteria workers, and clerical employees for the fiscal year beginning July 1 , 2009, or take any action 
relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the School Committee 

Comment: The purpose of this Article is to fund the collective bargaining agreements. 

The Finance Committee recommends that the Town vote to indefinitely postpone this 
Article. 



Article 17 

Indefinitely postponed 
Majority Vote 
5/4/09 ATM 



ARTICLE 18. To see what action the Town will take in relation to the salaries of elected Town 

Officials for the ensuing year, or take any action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the Board of Selectmen 

Comment: The statutes require that the Town vote to fix salaries of elected Officers 
annually. The appropriation is in Article 26. 

The Finance Committee recommends that the Town vote to fix salaries as follows: 

Constable $100 
Article 18 
Majority Vote 
5/4/09 ATM 



137 



ARTICLE 19, That the Town vote to amend the Swampscott Zoning By-Law by (a) deleting 

the stricken text shown in red and by adding the new text shown in blue and green, and by deleting 
Appendix A and Appendix B of the existing By-Law in their entirety and replacing them with the new 
Appendix A and Appendix B, all of which are set forth in the document labeled Town Meeting Draft - 
April 5, 2009, attached as Appendix G to the Town Meeting Warrant, as further supplemented by the 8 
page supplement provided to Town Meeting Members, each document having been filed with the Town 
Clerk, and (b) to amend the Town's Zoning Map accordingly as shown on the accompanying map filed 
with the Town Clerk. 
Article 19 

Unanimous Vote as amended 
5/6/09 ATM 

Motion made and seconded to amend the proposed zoning by-law revisions by deleting the word 
"detached" wherever it may appear in section 2.2.4,7. of the by-law and to insert the word "line" at the 
end of the definition of "lot line side" contained in the definition section. 
Article 19 
Unanimous Vote 
5/6/09 ATM 

Motion made and seconded to amend 3.2.3.5. to read as follows: In all districts, one (1) free-standing 
sign per lot (except where more may be allowed by other provisions of this by-law) identifying the 
premises of a municipal building, school, church, temple, or other religious organization building 
provided, however, that the size of such sign shall not exceed six (6) square feet in any residential district 
unless a special permit is obtained and sixty (60) square feet in any other district. 
Article 19 
Majority Vote 
5/6/09 ATM 



Article 19 requires 2/3's affirmative vote to adopt 

Motion made and seconded to lay on the table Article 19/Unanlmous Vote 5/4/09 ATM 
Motion made and seconded to appoint Gerry Perry as protempore/ Majority Vote 5/4/09 
Motion made and seconded to take Article 19 from the table/Majority Vote 5/6/09 

Motion made and seconded to convene at 8:05 p.m. the May 6, 2009 Special Town 
Meeting/Unanimous vote, 5/6/09 

Motion made and seconded to adjourn at 8:05 p.m. the May 6, 2009 Special Town Meeting to 
discuss Article 19 of the Annual Town Meeting article/Unanimous vote, 5/6/09 

See above for individual Article 1 9 Amendment votes 



138 



TOWN OF SWAMPSCOTT ZONING BY-LAW REVISIONS 



SUMMARY OF REVISIONS FROM APRIL 5. 2009 DRAFT 



^ Exempts projects tliat filed applications Avith the ZBA before April 13, 2009 from 
changes that limit the amount of dimensional relief the ZBA can grant under a 
dimensional special permit 

^ Exempts from the new site plan special permit requirement certain projects that 
received site plan approval from tlie Planning Board bet>veen July 1, 2008 and April 
17, 2009 (but which have not yet pulled a building permit). 

Establishes a maximum height for free-standing signs in commercial districts (25 
feet in B-3 District and 18 feet in B-1 and B-3 District). No maximum height 
contained in existing bylaw. 

^ Clarifies that Planning Board and ZBA must jointly establish rules for Site Plan 
Special Permit review \Nithin 60 days of effective date of by-law revisions. 

^ Pro^1des Planning Board an opportunity to comment on Site Plan applications 
before the ZBA prior to action on such applications by the ZBA. 

Clarifies that projects in the PDDs require administrative site plan approval from 
the Planning Board. 

Technical revisions to lot line and open space definitions. 

/ Inclusion of Tattoo and Body Piercing use category and definition. (Now only 

permitted by special permit in B-3 District. Under existing bylaw use allowed in all 
commercial districts by special permit.) 

Revision to require special permit for any business seeking to operate prior to 7 a.m. 
or after 10:00 p.m. (prior draft stated prior to 6:00 a.m. and after 11:00 p.m.) 



)01I37.RTF} 



139 



REDLINE REFLECTING CHANGES FROM APRIL 5. 2009 DRAFT 
CHANGE TO SECTION 2.2.3.O.: USE TABLE 



2.2.3.0. Table of Principal Uses. See definitions in Article VI. 



5. 


PRINCIPAL USE 


A-1 


A-2 


A-3 


B-] 


B-2 


M 


I 


Off-street 
Parkins 
GrouD fSec 
Art 3.1.2.0) 


Selling aLanimals and pets 


N 


N 


N 


SP 


SP 


SP 


N 


G 


38. 


Any Permitted Use open before 62:00 a.m. or later 
tlian 4+El:00 p.m. 


N 


N 


N 


SP 


SP 


SP 


SP 


N/A 




Tattoo and Bodv Piercinp Shop 




N 






■Ik -'^ 






a 



CHANGE TO SECTION 2.3.6.5.: DIMENSIONAL SPECIAL PERMITS 

2.3.6.5. The resulting sb-ucture will not exceed a dimensional requirement by up 
to twenty (20%) percent of the underlying minimum yard setback 
requuement, up to ten (10%) percent of the underlying lot coverage or 
height requiiement and up to fifty (50%) percent of the underlying 
minimum open space requirement (for example, without limitation, 
where the underlying dimensional requirement allows a maximum lot 
coverage of twenty-five (25%) percent, a dimensional special permit 
may only be issued to allow up to a twenty-seven and one-half (27.5%) 
percent maximum lot coverage; where the underlying dimensional 
reqiiirement allows a minimum side yard setback of fifteen (15) feet, a 
dimensional special permit may only be issued to reduce the minimum 
side yard setback to twelve (12) feet; where the underlying dimensional 
requirement allows a maximum height of thirty-five (35) feet, a 
dimensional special permit may only be issued to increase the 
maximimi height to thirty eight and one-half (38.5) feet, where the 
underlying minimum open space requirement is twenty-five (25%) 
percent, a dimensional special permit may only be issued to decrease 
the rainiinum open space to twelve and one-half (12.5%) percent, etc.)^ 
The percentage limitations contained in this Section 2.3 ■6.5. shall not 
applv to (i) any projec t describ ed in an application for a dimensional 
special permit pursuant to Section 2.3.6.0. that was filed with the Town 
Clerk prior to A pril 13. 2009. or (ii) anv request for a dimensional 
special permit pursuant to Section 2.3.6.0. for relief from a minimum 
yard setback requirement, which request does not seek to extend the 
footprint of the structure anv closer to the relevant lot line than cuirently 
exists, but which instead seeks to peimit an addition to the structure that 
is proposed to be located the same or greater distance from the relevant 
lot line as the existing footprint of the structure . 



{00001137.RTF) 



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CHANGE TO SECTION 3,2.4.0.: SIGN REGULATIONS 



3.2.4.0. District or Use Regulations. 

3.2.4.1. Signs in the B-1 and B-2 Districts. 

(b) In addition, subject to receipt of a Special Permit from tlie Board 
of Appeals under Section 5.3.0.0. below and a permit from the Inspector 
of Buildings as provided in Section 3.2.6.0. below, one (1) free-standing 
sign may be permitted per commercial development in the B-1 and B-2 
Districts, provided that the off-street pai-king for such commercial 
development is located adjacent to the street or way on which the 
commercial development fi'onts . such free-standing sign does not 
exceed thiilv (30 square feet in area, and such free-standing sign does 
not exceed thift veighteen (^JJ) sq«afe-feet in aFear -height. 

3.2.4.2. Signs in the B-3 and J Districts. 

(b) In addition to the signs peimitted above, within the B-3 and I 
Districts, subject to receipt of a special permit from the Board of 
Appeals and a permit from the Inspector of Buildings as provided in 
Section 3.2.6.0. below, one (1) free-standing sign may be peimitted per 
commercial development, located at any enti^ance to the premises, not to 
exceed sixty (60) square feet in are a and not to exceed twentv-five (25) 
feet in height . 



CHANGE TO SECTION 5.2.3.O.: BOARD OF APPEALS / PLANNING BOARD 
REGULATIONS. 

5.2.3.0. Regulations. The Board of Appeals and the Planning Board may adopt rules and 
regulations for the administration of the powers granted to it under this By-Law. To 
promote consistency in the administration of Site Plan Special Permits, the Boaid of 
Appeals and the Planning Board shall within sixty (60) davs of the effective date of this 
Bv-Law i ointlv adopt rules for the administration of Site Plan Special Permits. 



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CHANGE TO SECTION 5.4.3,0.: SITE PLAN SPECIAL PERMIT PROCEDURE. 

5.4.3.0. Procedures. In order to streamlijie the permitting process, the special permit 
granting authority for the piuposes of site plan special permits under this Section 
54.0.0. (the "Site Plan Special Permit Granting Authority") shall be (i) the Boai-d of 
Appeals if the project or development requiring the site plan special permit also 
requires one (1) or more additional special permits or variances from the Board of 
Appeals, or (ii) tlie Planning Board in all other cases. In the case where a project or 
development requii'es a site plan special pennit and one (1) or more additional special 
pennits or variances, the applicant shall submit a single apphcation for all such special 
peiinits or variances to tlie Board of Appeals. Notwithstanding the foregoing, anv 
application for a Site Plan Special Permit filed with the Board of Appeals shall be 
automatically transfen-ed to the Plann in g Board, and the Planning Board shall become 
the Site Plan Special Pennit Granting Authority and the Board of Appeals shall take no 
further action with regard to an application for a Site Plan Special PeiTnit. in either of 
the following circumstances: (b) the application pending before the Board of Appeals 
is amended so as to no longer require any other special pemiits or variances fexcept for 
a Site Plan Special Pennifl. or (h) all of the applicant's requests for other special 
pemiits or variances ("except for the Site Plan Special Pennit") are denied bv the Board 
of Appeals. 

Applicants for site plan special permits shall submit six (6) copies of the site plan to the 
Planning Board if it is the Site Plan Special Permit Granting Authority for review, nine 
(9) copies of the site plan to the Board of Appeals if it is the Site Plan Special Pennit 
Granting Authority, two (2) copies of the site plan review materials with the 
application to the Town Clerk, and within three (3) days thereafter shall also submit a 
copy of the site plan materials to the Board of Health, Inspector of Buildings, Town 
Engineer, Fire Department-afid^ Conservation Commission lo Fand. if the Planning 
Board is not the Site Plan Special Pennit Granting Authority^ the Planning Board, for 
each of their advisoiy review and comm e nts written recommendations and/or 
comments. Where the Board of Appeals is the Site Plan Special Permit Granting 
Authority, the Site Plan Special Pennit Granting Authority shall not take final action 
on anv Site Plan Special Permit until the earlier of (i) thirtv-five (351 davs after filing 
of the Site Plan Special Pennit application with the Site Plan Special Permit Granting 
Authority, and (iil receipt bv the Site Plan Special Permit Granting Authority of written 
reports from the Board of Heahh. Inspector of Buildings. Town Engineer. Fire 
Department. Conservation Commission and, if the Planning Board is not the Site Plan 
Special Permit Granting Authority, the Planning Board. Where the Planning Board is 
the Site Plan S pecial Permit Granting Authority, the Site Plan Special Pennit Granting 
Authority shall not take final action on any Site Plan Special Pennit until the earlier of 
(ii twenty (20) davs after filing of the Site Plan Special Pennit application with the Site 
Plan Special Pennit Granting Authority, and (ii) receipt bv the Site Plan Special Permit 
Granting Authority of written reports from the Board of Health. Inspector of 
Buildings. Town Engineer. Fire Department, and Conseivation Co mmission. The Site 
Plan Special Permit Granting Authority shall review the site plan and approve it in 
accordance with the requirements and procedures otherwise applicable to specizd 



{00001 137.RTF ) 



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pemiits under G.L. C.40A and this By-Law, except as otlierwise expressly provided in 
this Section 5.4. 0.0. Inspector of Buildings. No deviation from an approved site plan 
shall be permitted without modification thereof which has received Planning Board 
approval from the Site Plan Special Perniit Granting Authority . 



CHANGE TO SECTION 5.4,6.0.: SITE PLAN SPECIAL PERMIT PLAN 
REQUIREMENTS. 

5.4.6.0, Contents of Plan - Residential. The contents of the site plan for single and 
two-family residences are as follows (plans with regard to multi-family residences 
shall meet the plan requirements for commercial developments set fojth in Section 
5.4.5.0 above): 

5.4.6.1. For construction activities identified in Sections 5.4.2.2. and 5.4.2.3., 
the applicant shall submit five (5) copies of th e following site plan 
mat e rials to followine plans prepared at a scale of one (I) inch equals 
foilv (40^ feet (or at such other scale as otherwise required herein or as 
may be approved by the Site Plan Special Permit Granting Authority-fer 
r e view, and two (2) copies of the sit e plan and mat e rials with the 
application to th e Town Cler k ), shall be submitted. The plans are as 
follows : 



CHANGE TO SECTION 5.4.9.O.: SITE PLAN SPECIAL PERMIT APPLICABILITY. 
5. 4 .9.0. In/onfionolly omiffcci. 

5.4.9.0. Annlicahilitv. Notwithstanding anything to the contrary contained in this 
By-Law, at the election of the proiect applicant, a project that requires a Site Plan 
Special Pennit under this Bv-Law shall not be required to obtain a Site Plan Special 
PeiTnit for such proiect. but shall continue to be subject to the Pre-Existing Site Plan 
Approval fas defined hereinV where i\) site plan approval for the project was voted on 

' and approved bv the Planning Board (regardless of when the decision was filed) on or 
after July 1. 2008 but prior to April 17. 2009 (referred to for the purposes of this 
Section 5.4.9.0. as a "Pre-Existing Site Plan Approval"! (\\) a building permit for the 
proiect was duly issued bv the Inspector of Buildings on or before January 1 . 201 0. and 
(\\\\ the proiect is substantially completed on or before January 1. 2011. 
Notwith standing that the Pre-Existing Site Plan Ap proval was originally issu ed by the 
Plaiming Board, a Pre-Existing Site Plan Approval may be amended bv (a') the Board 
of Appeals if the project subject of the Pre-Existing Site Plan Approval requires but has 
not vet received one (H or more approvals from the Board of Appeals and such 
amendment is required due to changes to the project required b v the Boar d of Appeals 
in connection with the approvals sought from the Board of Appeals, or (b) in all other 
cases, the Planning Board. Any amendment of a Pre-Existing Site Plan Approval 
referenced in the immedia tely preceding sentence shall not be considered nor shall it 



{0000I137.RTF} 



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require a Site Plan Special Permit under this Bv-Law. Notwit hstanding anything to the 
contrary contained within this Section S.4.O.O.. for the purposes of projects located 
within the Planned Development Districts (PPDsl under Section 2.1.1 .7. and Section 
4.5.0.0. of this Bv-Law. site plan review for such proiects shall not be a special pemiit 
process and shall not be subject to the special pen-nit requirements of G.L.c. 40A. All 
projects within the PDDs shall be subject to administrative site plan review bv the 
Planning Board, and the Planning Board shall onlv have the right to (i) approve the site 
plan, (u) approve the site plan with reasonable conditions, or (in) denv the site plan 
onlv if the site plan fails to furnish adequate information required bv t his Bv-L aw. Site 
plan review for proiects within the PDDs shall be subject to t he req uirements of 
Sections 5.4.1.0.. 5.4.4.0.. 5.4.5.0. or 5.4.6.O.. as app licable , and 5.4.7.0. of this 
Bv-Law. In connection with approving or approving w ith cond itions a site plan for 
proiects within the PDDs. the Planning Board shall make the findings contained within 
Section 5.4.8.1 . through 5.4.8.9. of this Bv-Law. 



CHANGE TO SECTION 5.12.1.4.: DRIVE-THROUGH DESIGN CRITERIA. 

5.12.1.4. A Drive-Through with a sepaiate ordering point (including ordering 
box) and pick-up window shall provide stacking space for at least six (6) veliicles in advance of 
each ordering point and stacking space for at least four (4) veliicles between each ordering point 
and pick-up window. Where the ordering point and pick-up point are via the same window, the 
Drive-Through shall provide stacking space for at least ten (10) vehicles in advance of such 
window ■ For the puiuoses of this Section 5.12.1 .4.. the dimension of each vehicle for the purooses 
of planning the stacking space shall be twenty r2Q) feet in length bv ten (1 0") feet in width. 



CHANGE TO ARTICLE V: DEFINITIONS. 
Article VI. Definitions. 

Lot lin e, front : Side lot line means anv lot lin e of which one e nd touches a stre e t lot line. Street 
lot line or str e et line m e ans a line dividin g The lines separating a lot from the right-of-wav of a 
street.-Rear 

Lot line^ rear: Any lot line mean s anv lot line which is not a styee tfront lot line or a^side lot line. 
S e e Figure 3 in App e ndix - B. 

Lot line, side: Anv line which separates a lot from another lot and which intersects a front lot. 

Open Space: The area of a lot expressed as a percentage of lot not occupied by the footprint of 
buildings, stiTictures, and/or impci'vious material ? that is not pewious. No vehicles may be parked 
within the minimum required Open Space. 



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Lot Area = X 

Square Footage of all buildings, structures, and impervious m aterial that is not 
peivious = Y 

Open Space = Y / X 

Pervious material: Surface material intended to allow water to pemieate thi'ough into the ground. 
The surface material may include, but not limited to. vegetation, rocks, pebbles, woodchips and/or 
similar landscaping materials: or unit paver with an open joint pattern. Concrete^ asphalt, and/or 
other hard surface material that does not have open, porous joints is not considered pervious. 
Undisturbed natural occuirins bedrock outcroppings are considered pervious material. 

Tattoo and Body Piercing Shop: An establishment wh ose princi ple business activitv. either in 
terms of operation or as held out to the public, is the practice of one or more of the fo llowing: CI) 
placing of designs, letters, figures, symbols, or other marks upon or under the skin of any person, 
using ink or other substances that result in the permanent coloration of the skin, bv means of the 
use of needles or other instmments designed to contact or puncture the skin: (2) creation of an 
opening in the body of a person for the purpose of inserting ieweli^ or other decoration. 



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Legend: 

Insertion 

D e letion 

Mov e d from 

Moved to 

Style change 
Foiinat change 
Me^-e4-d6leH8i:i 
Inserted cell 
Deleted cell 
Moved cell 
Split/Merged cell 
Padding cell 



{00001U7.RTF} 



146 



ARTICLE 20, To see if the Town will vote to transfer unexpended balances as shown on the 

books of the Town Accountant as of June 30, 2008, to the Surplus Revenue Accounts, or take any action 
relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Town Administrator 

Comment: This is a routine article to make use of funds, which were appropriated in prior 
fiscal years but not spent. Generally, such funds have been appropriated under Articles, other 
than the general budget, since unspent budget monies "expire" at the end of the year and 
become free cash. 

The Finance Committee will report on this Article at Town Meeting. 



Article 20 

Indefinitely postponed 
Majority Vote 
5/4/09 ATM 



ARTICLE 21. To see if the Town will vote to transfer funds from various Town accounts which 

have monies remaining therein to such other Town accounts which reflect a deficit, or take any action 
relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Town Administrator 

Comment: The purpose of this Article is to "capture" unexpended funds, which will remain in 
the various Town accounts as of June 30, 2009, which is the end of the fiscal year. Such monies 
could automatically flow into the Town's free cash, but would be not available to reduce the tax 
rate until the succeeding fiscal year, i.e., beginning July 1, 2010. These funds have already been 
appropriated and have been reflected in our current tax bills. 

The Finance Connmittee will report on this Article at Town Meeting. 



Article 21 

Indefinitely postponed 
Majority Vote 
5/4/09 ATM 



147 



ARTICLE 22. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from the Surplus Revenue Account of the 

Town to the account of Current Revenue of $350,000 to be used and applied by the Board of Assessors 
in the reduction of the tax levy, or take any action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the Town Administrator 

Comment: Surplus revenue is money not set aside for any special purpose. It results from 
the difference between estimates and actual receipts of departmental collections and revenues 
(such as licenses, permits, etc.) plus unexpended funds from departmental budgets. When 
uncollected taxes are subtracted from surplus revenue, the total is "Free Cash". This is normally 
surplus revenue available for Town Meeting to be used to reduce taxes for the coming year. 

The Finance Committee will report on this Article at Town Meeting. 

Motion made and seconded to lay on the table Article 22/Unanimous vote 5/4/09 ATM 
Motion made and seconded to take from the table Article 22/Majority Vote 5/6/09 ATM 



Article 22 

Majority Vote as amended 
5/6/09 ATM 



ARTICLE 23. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the continuation of the Council on Aging 

Revolving Account as authorized by Chapter 44, Section 53E1/2, of the Massachusetts General Laws, 
said account to be under the direction of the Council on Aging and used for the deposit of receipts 
collected through public donations; and further to allow the Council on Aging to expend funds not to 
exceed $25,000 for fiscal year 201 from said account for ongoing supplies and equipment. This would 
be contingent upon an annual report from the Council on Aging to the Town on the total receipts and 
expenditures of the Account each fiscal year, or take any action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the Town Administrator 

Comment: The intent of this article is to promote good fiscal responsibility through the 
continuation of a petty cash account of monies received and paid out. The Council on Aging 
would also have the responsibility of reporting to the Town the total receipts and expenditures 
through this account each fiscal year. 

The Finance Committee recommends that the Town vote to approve this Article. 



Article 23 
Majority Vote 
5/4/09 ATM 



148 



ARTICLE 24. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the continuation of the Recycling - Blue 

Bins Revolving Account as authorized by Chapter 44, Section 53E1/2, of the Massachusetts General 
Laws, said account to be under the direction of the Health Department and used for the deposit of 
receipts collected through the sale of recycling bins; and further to allow the Health Department to expend 
funds not to exceed $5,000 for fiscal year 2010 from said account for ongoing supplies and equipment. 
This would be contingent upon an annual report from the Health Department to the Town on the total 
receipts and expenditures of the Account each fiscal year, or take any action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the Town Administrator 

Comment: The intent of this article is to allow funds received from recycling activities {e.g., 
sale of recycling bins) to be used solely for additional recycling and health activities. The Health 
Department would also have the responsibility of reporting to the Town the total receipts and 
expenditures through this account each fiscal year. 

The Finance Committee recommends that the Town vote to approve this Article. 



Article 24 
Majority Vote 
5/4/09 ATM 



ARTICLE 25. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the continuation of a Recreation Revolving 

Account as authorized by Chapter 44, Section 53E1/2, of the Massachusetts General Laws, said account 
to be under the direction of the Town Administrator and used for the deposit of receipts collected through 
user fees of recreation programs; and further, to allow the Town Administrator to expend funds not to 
exceed $150,000 for fiscal year 2010 from said account for ongoing supplies, salanes and equipment. 
This would be contingent upon an annual report from the Recreation Department to the Town on the total 
receipts and expenditures of the Account each fiscal year, or take any action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the Town Administrator 

Comment: The intent of this article is to allow funds received from recreation activities to be 
used solely for additional recreation activities. The Town Administrator/Recreation Department 
would also have the responsibility of reporting to the Town the total receipts and expenditures 
through this account each fiscal year. 

The Finance Committee recommends that the Town vote to approve this Article. 



Article 25 
Majority Vote 
5/4/09 ATM 



149 



ARTICLE 26. To act on the report of the Finance Committee on the Fiscal Year 201 budget 

and to raise and appropriate or transfer from available funds money for the operation of the Town's 
Departments and the payment of debt service and all other necessary and proper expenses for the year, 
or take any action relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Finance Committee 

Comment: The Finance Committee's recommendation will be the initial motion on the floor 
to deal with this budget. The budget as printed here will be amended to reflect any changes 
voted at this Town Meeting. The Moderator has traditionally allowed for discussion and 
reconsideration of each line item within this budget individually and in any order. 

The Finance Committee will report on this Article at Town Meeting. 



Article 26 amendments to FY2010 Budget Recommendations 

Reduce DPW Fuel-Line Item 59 to $10,000; Increase Unclassified Reserve Fund-Line Item 89 to 
$182,500; Reduce Unclassified Unemployment Line to $0; Reduce School Line Item 96 to $22,600,00; 
Eliminate the Finance Committee Contingent Budget column entirely from the recommendation. 



Article 26 

Majority Vote as amended 
5/6/09 



ARTICLE 27. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from the Surplus Revenue Account of the 

Water Enterprise Fund to the account of Current Revenue the sum of $250,000 to be used and applied by 
the Board of Selectmen in the reduction of the water rate, or take any action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the Board of Selectmen 

Comment: Surplus revenue is money not set aside for any special purpose. It results from 
the difference between estimates and actual receipts of water user fees and other revenues plus 
unexpended funds from the water department's budget. This is normally surplus revenue 
available for Town Meeting to be used to reduce rates for the coming year. 

The Finance Committee recommends that the Town vote to approve this Article. 



Article 27 
Majority Vote 
5/6/09 ATM 



150 



DEPARTMENTAL BUDGET 

July 1, 2009 through June 30, 2010 



Department Administrator Finance Committee Finance Committee 
Approp. Approp. it. Requested Recommended Recommended Contingent 
FY'08 FY'09 No. FY10 FY'10 FY'10 FY10 

General Government 

MODERATOR 



* 

♦ 




S 


: — 




Expenses 


5 


^ — 


S 




» 




$ 


• 


$ 


- 




Total Moderator Budget 


$ 


- 


$ 


• 


$ 


— 

■ 












FINANCE COMMITTEE 
























Secretary 




- 












200 




200 


1 


Expenses 




200 




200 




200 


i 


200 


$ 


200 




Total Finance Committee Budget 


$ 


200 


$ 


200 


% 


200 












SELECTMEN'S OFFICE 
















. 




- 




Board Expenses 




. 




. 




. 




7^ 




7.500 




Office Expenses 




7,275 




7.275 




7.275 




4,314 




4.314 




Mass. Municipal Assoc. 




4,185 




4.S00 




• 4,500 








- 




Union Related Expenses 




- 




- 




- 




- 




- 




Contingent 




- 




- 




- 




11,814 




11,814 


2 


Total Expenses 




11,460 




11,775 




11,775 


% 


11,814 


$ 


11,814 




Total Budget 


$ 


11,460 


$ 


11,775 


% 


11,775 












TOWN ADMINISTRATOR 














$ 


119.314 




124,614 




Town Administrator 




118,000 




124.614 




124,614 


$ 


- 




- 




Personnel Manager 




- 




- 




- 


$ 


43,486 




44,791 




Administrative Assistant 




45,911 




45,911 




45,911 


$ 


" 




" 




Other Compensation 




- 




- 




■ 


$ 


162,800 


$ 


169,405 


3 


Total Salaries 


$ 


163,911 


$ 


170,525 


% 


170,525 


$ 


2,400 


s 


2,400 


4 


Expenses 




2.400 




2,400 




2.400 


i 


165,200 


$ 


171,805 




Total Town Administrator Budget 


$ 


166,311 


$ 


172,925 


% 


172,925 












LAW DEPARTMENT 
















70,000 




80,000 


5 


Town Counsel Contract Expense 




77,600 




80,000 




80,000 




70,000 


$ 


80,000 




Total Law Budget 


$ 


77,600 


$ 


80,000 


% 


80,000 












PARKING TICKET CLERK 






















6 


Salary 
















8,500 




7,500 


7 


Expenses 




7,000 




7,000 




7,000 




8,500 


% 


7,500 




Total Parking Clerk Budget 


$ 


7,000 


% 


7,000 


$ 


7,000 












WORKERS' COMPENSATION 
















110,000 




110,000 




Expenses (Police & Fire) 




110,000 




110,000 




110,000 




180,000 




180,000 




Benefits/Insurance 




180,000 




180,000 




180,000 


% 


290,000 


$ 


290,000 


8 


Total Workers' Comp Budget 


$ 


290,000 


i 


290,000 


$ 


290,000 












PERSONNEL 
















33,695 




41.235 




Personnel Manager 




43,478 




43,478 




43,478 




19.448 








Assistant 
















1,295 




1,350 




Other Compensation 




1,052 




1,052 




1,052 


% 


54,438 


$ 


42,585 


9 


Total Salaries 




44,530 




44,530 




44,530 




2,000 




2.000 


9A 


Expenses 




1,800 




1,800 




1,800 




56,438 


$ 


44,585 




Total Personnel Budget 




46,330 


s 


46,330 


$ 


46,330 



151 



Department Administrator Finance Committee Finance Committee 
Approp. Approp. It. Requested Recommended Recommended Contingent 





FY'08 




FY'09 


No. 






FY'10 




FY'10 




FY'10 












ACCOUNTING DEPARTMENT 




















OR QR-i 












89 135 








41 906 




43 775 




A^^f Tnuun AfW^nntaul 




44 870 




44 870 




44 870 




2,000 




3,400 




Other Compensation 




3!400 




3,400 




3,400 




128,334 




134,136 


10 


Total Salaries 




137,405 




137,405 




137,405 




50,000 




110,000 


11 


Uncompensated Balances 




150,000 




150,000 




150,000 




" 




" 




Salary Reserve 




■ 








" 




8,000 




8,000 




Office Expenses 




6,000 




6,000 




6,000 




3,500 




3,500 




Educational Expense 




3,500 




3,500 




3,500 




8,000 




o,UUU 




Outside Services 




a AAn 
O,0UU 




8,000 




8,000 




19,500 




19,500 


12 


Total Expenses 




17,500 




17,500 




17,500 


$ 


197,834 




263,636 




Total Accounting Budget 




304,905 




304,905 




304,905 












TECHNOLOGY DEPARTMENT 
















58.195 




5,200 


13 


Network Specialist 




5,200 




5,200 




5,200 




90,200 




93,500 




Outside Services 




90,600 




90,600 




90,600 




3,500 




3,500 




Supplies 




3,250 




3,250 




3,250 




500 








Educational Expense 




" 




" 




■ 




94,200 




97,000 


14 


Total Expense 




93,850 




93,850 




93,850 


$ 


152,395 


$ 


102,200 




Total Technology Budget 


$ 


99,050 


$ 


99,050 


$ 


99,050 












TREASURER/COLLECTOR 
















68,974 




71,043 




Treasurer 




72,819 




72,819 




72,819 












Asst. Treasurer/Collector 








A A IJ7n 




AA fi7n 




81,819 




CkA nc7 




oiencai [£) 




86,169 




86,169 




86,169 












Other Compensation 




3.250 




3,250 








152,293 




201,085 


15 


Total Salaries 




207,108 




207,108 




207,108 




10,750 




10,750 




Office Expenses(lncludes Tax Title) 




5,000 




5,000 




5,000 




2,250 




2,250 




TraveVSeminars 




500 




500 




500 




34,150 




37,000 




Postage 




35,000 




40,000 




40,000 




2,500 




2,500 




Bank Service Fees 




-_ 




~ 




' 




49,650 




52,500 


16 


Total Expenses 




40,500 




45,500 




45,500 


$ 


201,943 


$ 


253,585 




Total Treasurer/Collector Budget 


% 


247,608 


$ 


252,608 


$ 


252,608 












TOWN CLERK 
















50,917 




52,427 




Town Clerk 




53,738 




53,738 




53,738 




40.906 




42,034 




Clerical 




43,952 




43,952 




43,952 




7,260 




7,200 




Poll Workers 




3,000 




3,000 




3,000 




2,000 




1,500 




Custodians 




450 




450 




450 




3.637 




2,000 




Other Compensation 




2,000 




2,000 




2,000 


$ 


104,720 


$ 


105,161 


17 


Total Salaries 


$ 


103,140 


$ 


103,140 


$ 


103,140 










18 


Town Postage Account* 
























'Moved to Treassurer/Collector Budget 
















2,500 








Machine Preparation 
















4,000 




4,000 




Office Expenses 




3,880 




3,880 




3,880 




2.500 




2,500 




Town Meeting 




2,425 




2,425 




2,425 




7,137 




9,000 




Election Expenses 




8,500 




8,500 




8,500 




1.750 




1,750 




TraveVSemlnars 




750 




750 




750 




17,887 




17,250 


19 


Total Expenses 




15,555 




15,555 




15,555 


$ 


122,607 


$ 


122,411 




Total Clerk Budget 




118,695 


$ 


118,695 


% 


118,695 



152 



Department Administrator Finance Committee Finance Committee 

Approp. Approp. It. Requested Recommended Recommended Contingent 

FY'08 FY'09 No. FY'IO FY'10 FY'10 FY10 

ELECTION COMMISSION Included w/Town Clerk 

Clerk 

Pod Workers - - 

Custodians 

-_ -_ Incentives •__ -_ ^_ 

$ • $ - 20 Total Salaries $ - $ - $ 

Board Expenses - - 

Office Expenses - - 

Election Expenses - 

^ ^ Machine Preparation ^ -_ 

21 Total Expenses - - 







• 






1 0131 BUGQet 


c 

9 








* 






























54 104 




57 500 








58 938 




SB 93S 




58 938 




SI. 81 2 




64,067 




Clerical (2) 




57,636 




87,904 




87,904 




5,196 




7.000 




Other Compensation 




7.790 




7,790 




7,790 


$ 


141,112 


$ 


128,567 


22 


Total Salaries 


$ 


124,364 


$ 


154,632 


$ 


154,632 




. 




. 




Board Expenses 




- 




- 




- 




1,000 




1,000 




Appellate Tax Board 




1.000 




1,000 




1,000 




1,500 




1,500 




Office Expenses 




1.500 




1,500 




1,500 




- 




- 




Travel 




' 




- 




- 




1,000 




1,000 




Education/Professional Devek>pment 




1,000 




1,000 




1,000 




3,500 




3,500 


23 


Total Expenses 




3,500 




3,500 




3,500 




22,500 




9,000 


24 


Outside Sen/ices 




9,000 




9,000 




9,000 


$ 


167,112 


$ 


141,067 




Total Assessor's Budget 




136,864 


$ 


167,132 


% 


167,132 












TUNING BOAKD Ur ArPcALo 
















1 500 




3 000 


25 






3 000 




3 000 




3,000 




3,700 




sisoo 


26 


Expenses 




5.200 




5^200 




5,200 


$ 


5,200 


$ 


8,500 




Total ZBA Budget 


$ 


8,200 


$ 


8,200 


% 


8,200 












PU^NNING 
















34,763 




35.806 




Towrn Planner 
















1,500 




1,500 




Secretary 




1,500 




1,500 




1,500 




36,263 




37,306 


27 


Total Salaries 




1,500 




1,500 




1,500 




1,420 




1,420 




Expenses 




800 




800 




800 




1,735 




1,435 




Professional Develop/Meml^erships 




1,200 




1,200 




1,200 




3,155 




2,855 


28 


Total Expenses 




2,000 




2,OC0 




2,000 


$ 


39,418 


$ 


40,161 




Total Planning Budget 


9 


3,500 


% 


3,500 


% 


3,500 


$ 


1,488,661 


$ 


1,537,464 




TOTAL. GENERAL GOVERNMENT 


$ 


1,517,723 


% 


1,562,320 


% 


1,562,320 












Pensions 
























CONTRIBUTORY RETIREMENT 
















2.712,445 




2.851.309 


29 


Pension Contribution 




3.190,209 




3,190.209 




3,190,209 


$ 


2,712,445 


$ 


2,851,309 




Total Budget 


$ 


3,190,209 


% 


3,190,209 


% 


3,190,209 












NON-CONTRIBUTORY PENSIONS 
















215,270 




212,000 


30 


Pension Contribution 




182,017 




182,017 




182.017 


$ 


215,270 


$ 


212,000 




Total Budget 


$ 


182,017 


% 


182,017 


% 


182,017 


$ 


2,927,715 




3,063,309 




TOTAL PENSIONS 


$ 


3,372,226 


% 


3,372,226 


% 


3,372,226 



153 



Department Administrator Finance Committee Finance Committee 
Approp. Approp. It. Requested Recommended Recommended Contingent 
FVOB FVOS No. FY'10 pno FY'IO FY10 



Public Protection 

POLICE DEPARTMENT 



102,058 


105,121 




Chief (1) 


105,121 


105,121 


105,121 


74.301 


75,788 




Captain (1) 


77,316 


77,316 


77,316 


248.000 


252,624 




Lieutenants (4) 


257,720 


257,720 


257,720 


337.734 


344,490 




Sergeants (6) 


351,438 


351.438 


351,438 


972.946 


1,005,692 




Patrolmen (19) 


924,017 


964.420 


964,420 


48,286 


49.251 




Administrative Assistants (.5) 


50,990 


25.495 


25,495 


10,000 


10,000 




Matrons 


10,000 


10,000 


10,000 


315,000 


325.000 




Vacation/Overtime 


350,000 


375,000 


375,000 


97,367 


100,575 




Holidays 


98,686 


101,504 


101,504 


13,208 


13.461 




Investigations/ID 


10,431 


10.431 


10,431 


318,542 


322.541 




Educational Incentive 


315,862 


326,790 


326,790 


122,067 


138.842 




Differential 


155,765 


158,633 


158,633 


104,000 


107,000 




Other Compensation 


107,000 


107,000 


107.000 


- 


- 




Contingent Appropriation 


- 


- 


- 


2,763,509 


2,850,385 


31 


Salary Subtotal 


2,814,346 


2.870,868 


2,870,868 




. 




Selective Enforcement 




- 


- 








School Traffic Supervisors 


- 






2,763,509 


2,850,385 




Total Salaries 


2,814,346 


2,870,868 


2,870,868 


27,500 


30,000 




Building Expenses 


28,000 


28,000 


28,000 


12,000 


12,000 




Office Expenses 


9.000 


9.000 


9,000 


. 


. 




Travel 


. 


. 


. 


48,000 


42,000 




Equipment Maintenance 


37,000 


37.000 


37.000 


12,000 


12,000 




Mobile Radio 


9.000 


9.000 


9,000 


10,000 


10,000 




Police Training 


8,000 


8.000 


8,000 


32,000 


32.000 




Uniforms 


28.000 


28,000 


28,000 


- 


- 




Bullet Proof Vests 


- 




- 


- 


- 




Computer Maintenance/Supplies 


- 


- 


- 


141,500 


138,000 


32 


Total Expenses 


119,000 


119,000 


119,000 




29.000 


33 


Police Vehicles 




_ 










ANIMAL CONTROL OFFICER 








_ 




34 


Officer's Salary 


_ 










35 


Expenses 








- 




36 


Boarding Animals/Pound/Supplies 




- 




$ - $ 






Subtotal Animal Control 








$ 2,905,009 $ 


3,017,385 




Total Police Budget 


S 2,933,346 $ 


2,989,868 $ 


2,989,868 








FIRE DEPARTMENT 








100.078 


103,081 




Chief (1) 


102,500 


100,850 


100,850 


74.152 


75,586 




Deputy Chief (1) 


77,066 


77,066 


77,066 


259.308 


265.775 




Captains (4) 


271,596 


271,596 


271.596 


234.330 


233.457 




Lieutenants (4) 


239,294 


239,294 


239,294 


1.189,790 


1 .283,271 




Fire Fighters (25) 


1 ,250,545 


1,250,645 


1,250,645 


5,401 


5.536 




Office Clerk 


5,674 


5,674 


5,674 


5,401 


5.536 




Mechanic 


5,674 


5,674 


5,674 


175,000 


180.000 




Minimurr Manning including O.T. & Vacation 


180,000 


200,000 


200,000 


109,773 


113,168 




Holidays 


112,662 


112,662 


1 1 2,662 


23,000 


23,000 




Injury Leave 


10,000 


10,000 


10,000 


67,425 


43,355 




Personal Time 


43,355 


43,355 


43.355 


57,791 


58,848 




Shift Differential /Night 


58,736 


58,735 


58,736 


96,984 


98,079 




Shift DifferentlaWi/eekend 


97,608 


97,608 


97,608 


16,650 


15,750 




Clothing Allovrance 


13.600 


13,600 


13,600 


21,800 


22,950 




Longevity 


23.523 


23.523 


23,523 


- 


. 




EMT SUpend 


. 


. 


- 


9,760 


10,000 




Out of Grade Pay 


4,000 


4.000 


4,000 


- 


- 




Defibrillator Stipend 


- 




- 


27,500 


27,500 




Sick Leave Buy Backs 


20,000 


20.000 


20.000 


2,474,143 


2,564,892 


37 


Total Salaries 


2,515,933 


2,534,283 


2,534,283 


36,000 


36,000 




Building Expenses 


35,000 


36,000 


36,000 


5,460 


5,460 




Office Expenses 


3.799 


3,799 


3.799 


1,500 


1,500 




Travel 


500 


500 


500 


40,000 


32.000 




Maintenance 


30,000 


30,000 


30,000 


4,500 


4,500 




Communications 


4,500 


4,500 


4,500 


4,000 


4,000 




Fire Prevention 


1,000 


2,500 


2,900 


3.000 


3,000 




Fire Hose 




2,000 


ZOOO 








Fire Investigations 








94,460 


86,460 


38 


Total Expenses 


75,799 


79,299 


79,299 


23.000 


23.000 


39 


Protective Clothing 


12,500 


14,000 


14,000 


75.800 


78,800 


40 


Lynn Dispatch/Mutual Aid 


78.000 


78,000 


78,000 


27.500 


27,500 


41 


Training 


15,000 


15,000 


15,000 


$ 2.694,903 $ 


2,780,652 




Total Fire Budget 


$ 2.697,232 $ 


2,720,582 $ 


2,720,582 



154 



Department Administrator Finance Committee Finance Committee 
Approp. Approp. It Requested Recommended Recommended Contingent 





FY'08 




FY'09 


No. 






FY'10 




FY'10 




FY'10 




























6 832 




6,832 


42 


Sslsry 




6,832 




6,832 




6,832 




2 700 




2,700 


43 


ExpsnsGS 




3,700 




2,700 




2,700 


$ 


9,532 


— 
> 


9,532 




Total Harbormaster Budget 


— 
$ 


10,532 




9,532 


$ 


9,532 












EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT 
















1.000 




1,000 


44 


Director 




1,000 




1,000 




1,000 




1.250 




1,250 


45 


Expenses 




1,182 




1,182 




1,182 


$ 


2,250 




2,250 




Total Emergency Mngtmt Budget 


> 


2,182 


> 


2,182 


% 


2,182 












WEIGHTS Ot MEASURES 
















5 000 




5 000 


46 


II lO^CLrlv/l 




5 000 




S 000 




5,000 




































Travel 






















47 


Total Expenses 














% 


5,000 


$ 


5,000 




Total weight s & Measures Budget 


$ 


5,000 


> 


5,000 


$ 


5,000 












CONSTABLE 














$ 


100 


S 


100 


48 


Salaries 


$ 


100 


$ 


100 


$ 


100 


% 


100 


$ 


100 




Total Constable Budget 


$ 


100 


% 


100 


$ 


100 












BUILDING DEPARTMENT 
















70.067 




72,169 




Building Inspector 




73,974 




73,974 




73,974 




10.000 




- 




Local Inspector 




- 




- 




- 




20.720 




20,720 




Plumbing Inspector 




20,720 




20,720 




20,720 




20.720 




20,720 




Wire Inspector 




20,720 




20,720 




20,720 












Fire Alarm Inspector 








* 












1 ,000 




Assistant Electric Inspector 




1,000 




1,000 




■1 t\/\n 
1 .UuU 




























1,000 




1,000 




Assistant Plumbing Inspector 




1,000 




1,000 




1,000 




40,906 




42,034 




Clerical 




44,502 




43,952 




43,952 












Town Planner 
















1,100 




1,100 




Other Compensation 




1,350 




1.350 




1,350 




165,513 




158,743 


49 


Total Salaries 




163,266 




162.716 




162,716 




6,000 




6,000 




Expenses 




525 




5,000 




5,000 




500 




500 




Travel/Seminars 




300 




300 




300 




- 




. 




Alarm Maintenance 




. 




. 




. 




6,500 




6,500 


50 


Total Expenses 




825 




5,300 




5,300 


% 


•172,013 


$ 


165,243 




Total Building Budget 


$ 


164,091 


$ 


168,016 


$ 


168,016 












CONSERVATION COMMISSION 














$' 


11,250 


$ 


11,588 


51 


Town Planner/Conservation Agent Secretary 


$ 


1,500 


$ 


1,500 


$ 


1,500 


$ 


1,120 


s 


1,120 




Expenses 


$ 


800 


$ 


800 


$ 


800 


$ 


800 


$ 


800 




Professional Develop/Memberships 


$ 


800 


$ 


800 


$ 


800 


$ 


1,920 


$ 


1,920 


51A Total Expenses 


$ 


1,600 


$ 


1,600 


$ 


1,600 


$ 


13,170 


s 


13,508 




Total Conservation Budget 


% 


3,100 


$ 


3,100 


$ 


3,100 












INSURANCE 
















4,305,000 




4,325,000 




Employee Group-Health 




4,200,000 




4,170,000 




4,170,000 




345,000 




285,000 




Property & Casualty Insurance 




275,000 




275,000 




275,000 


$ 


4,650,000 


$ 


4,610,000 


52 


Total Insurance Budget 


$ 


4,475,000 


$ 


4,445,000 


$ 


4,445,000 


$ 


10.451,977 


$ 


10,603,670 




TOTAL PUBLIC PROTECTION 


$ 10,290,583 


$ 


10,343,380 


$ 


10,343,380 



155 





Approp. 
FY'08 




Approp. 
FY'09 


It. 
No. 














Health and Sanitation 












HEALTH DEPARTMENT 




56.286 




57.977 




Health Officer 




19,893 




21.840 




Health Nurse _ 




40.206 




42.034 




Clerical 




5,000 




7,100 




Animal Control Officer's Salary 




1,850 




1,850 




Other Compensation 




123,237 




130,801 


53 


Total Salaries 




2,500 




2.500 




Office Expenses 




- 




- 




Travel 




2,500 




2,500 


54 


Total Expenses 




4.000 




4,000 


55 


Inspections and Tests 




2,000 




2,000 


56 


Tests/State Charges 












Animal Control Expenses 




500 




750 




ACO Expenses 




1,000 




2.000 




Boanjing Arimals/Pound/Supplies 




1,500 




2,750 


56A Subtotal Animal Control Expenses 




887,500 




932,000 


57 


Rubbish and Recyclables Collections 


% 


1,020,737 


% 


1,074,051 




Total Health Budget 


$ 


1,020,737 


% 


1,074,051 




TOTAL HEALTH AND SANITATION 












Public Works 












WAGES - General 




- 




- 




Standby 




- 




- 




Part-Tigne Labor 




- 




- 




Fish House Custodian 




7,500 




7,500 




Overtime 




• 




- 




Clothing Allowance 




3,750 




3,750 




Police Details 




- 




- 




Shift Differential 




- 




- 




Other Compensation 




337,945 




307,270 




Personnel 


$ 


349,195 


% 


318,520 


58 


Total Salaries - General 












EXPENSES - General 




65,000 




55,000 




Operating Expenses & Supplies 




10,000 




10.000 




Operating Expense Electric-Fish House 




10,000 




10,000 




Operating Expense-Fish house 




5,500 




2,500 




Communications 




36,500 




36,500 




Equipment Maintenance 








2.000 




Signs 




13,500 




25.000 




Administration Building 




- 




- 




Fuel 




3,200 




2.000 




Uniforms 




143,700 




143,000 


59 


Expenses Subtotal 




75,000 




75,000 


60 


Snow & Ice 




30,000 




25,000 


61 


Highway Maintenance 


$ 


248,700 


i 


243,000 




Total Expenses - General 


$ 


597,895 




561,520 




Total Budget - D.P.W. General 



Department Administrator Finance Committee Finance Committee 
Requested Recommended Recommended Contingent 





FY'10 




FY'10 




FY'10 




59,717 




59,717 




59,717 




22,386 




15,000 




15,000 




43,952 




43,952 




43,952 




10,000 




7,500 




7,500 




2,400 




2,400 




2,400 




138,455 




128,569 




128,569 




2,425 




2,425 




2,425 




2 425 




2 425 




2425 




3,880 




3,500 




3,500 




1,940 




1,900 




1,900 




728 




700 




700 




1,940 




1,940 




1,940 




2,668 




2,640 




2,640 




947,000 




941,000 




941,000 


$ 


1,096,368 


$ 


1,080,034 


$ 


1,080,034 


$ 


1,096,368 


$ 


1,080,034 


% 


1,080,034 




- 

- 

7,500 




■ 

- 

7,500 




- 
- 

7.500 




- 

5,000 
- 




- 

5,000 

- 




■ 

5,000 
■ 




- 

288,990 




- 

269,208 




269,208 


$ 


301,490 


$ 


281,708 


$ 


281,708 




55,000 




55,000 




55,000 




10,000 




10,000 




10,000 




5,000 




5,000 




5,000 




2,500 




2,500 




2,500 




35,000 




35,000 




35,000 




2,000 




2,000 




2.000 




40,000 




35,000 




35.000 




10,000 




10,000 




10,000 




1,000 




1,000 




1.000 




160,500 




155,500 




155,500 




75,000 




75,000 




75.000 




25,000 




25,000 




25,000 


$ 


260,500 


$ 


255,500 


$ 


255,500 


% 


561.990 




537,208 




537,208 



156 



Department Administrator Finance Committee Finance Committee 
Approp. Approp. It. Requested Recommended Recommended Contingent 
FY'08 FY'09 No. FY'10 FY'10 FY'10 FY10 





























001 Ai 1 




0/ Z,*f05J 








351 152 




0*7 1 1 f w 




331 370 




z r ,uuu 








Olal lUL/y 




27 000 




27 000 




27,000 












OcWcf DiaC#f\9 




5 000 




5 000 




5 000 
































3 750 








3 750 




3 750 




3,750 












r dlt'l line LaUUI 




















01 ,ouu 








1 




n Ron 




31 500 












0th6r Comp6ns3t]on 














$ 


389,061 


$ 


439,739 


62 


Total Salaries - Sewer 


$ 


418,402 


5 


398,620 


$ 


398,620 
































100,000 




Lift Station Operation & Maintenance 




100,000 




100,000 




. 100,000 








40,000 




Fuel 




40,000 




40,000 




40.000 








70,000 




Etsctric 




70,000 




70.000 




70,000 




85 000 




40,000 




Operating Expenses & Supplies 




40,000 




40,000 




40,000 




15,000 




15,000 




Equipment Maintenance 




15,000 




15,000 




15.000 




4,000 








Communications 
















6,000 








Sewer Bills 
















3,100 




2,600 




Uniforms 




2,600 




2,600 




2.600 




825,000 




825,000 




Lynn Sewer 




825,000 




825.000 




825,000 




938,100 




1,092,600 


63 


Expenses Subtotal 




1,092,600 




1,092,600 




1,092,600 










64 


Sewer System Maintenance 






















64A 


5£Vy£R RESERVE FUND 




25,000 




25,000 




25.000 




325,000 




375,000 




Indirect Costs 




375,000 




380.000 




360.000 




17,500 




17,500 




Administration 




17,500 




17,500 




17.500 




90,S42 




95,493 




Pension 




86,939 




86,939 




86,939 




217,940 




218.500 




Principal 




186,121 




186,121 




186,121 




34,462 




26.205 




Interest 




27,982 




27.982 




27,982 




685,744 






00 


Indirect Expenses Subtotal 




090,94^ 




696,542 






$ 


1,623,844 


$ 


1,825,298 




Total Expenses - Sewer 


$ 


1,811,142 


$ 


1,816,142 


% 


1,816,142 


$ 


2,012,905 


$ 


2,265,037 




Total Budget - Sewer Entrprise Fund 


$ 


2,229,544 


$ 


2,214,762 


% 


2,214,762 












Funded by Sewer Revenue 
























wMVsco waier 




















Of 1 ,91 




Personnel 








O^t^.OOU 












07 nc^n 




Qt^nrlKtr 

oianouy 




07 AAA 




■57 AAA 




07 Ann 




5 150 




5 000 




r lUsl III 




5 000 




5 000 




5 000 












Meier Kcauers 
















f ,uuu 








Df^tioA r^^f^ii^ 
nOllCe Uclolla 




7 AAA 




7 AAA 




7 000 












Part-Time Lat)or 
















94 <%nn 




24 500 




V.^Vcl llllll? 




24 500 




OA Rnn 
zt.ouu 




24,500 












Other Compensation 














$ 


380,966 


$ 


435,476 


66 


Total Salsries - Water 


$ 


425,647 


) 


405,865 


$ 


405,865 












EXPENSES • Water 




















40,000 




Fuel 




40,000 




40,000 




40,000 




85,000 




85,000 




Operating Expenses & Supplies 




85,000 




85.000 




85,000 




15,000 




15,000 




Equipment Maintenance 




15.000 




15,000 




15,000 




6,000 








Communications 
















6,000 




2,000 




Water Bills 




2,000 




2.000 




2,000 




3.120 




2,600 




Uniforms 




2,600 




2,600 




2.600 




1.385.000 




1,434,210 




MWRA 




1,552,800 




1,562.800 




1.450.000 




1,500,120 




1,578,810 


67 


Expenses Subtotal 




1,707,400 




1,707,400 




1,594,600 










68 


Water System Improvements * 
























* New 565k per year on an interest free state program 












_ 




_ 


68A 


WATER RESERVE FUND 




25,000 




25,000 




25,000 




325,000 




375.000 




Indirect Costs 




375,000 




380,000 




380.000 




77,640 




81,615 




Pension 




83,384 




83.384 




83.384 




848,853 




758.906 




Principal 




796,545 




796,545 




796.545 




62.937 




53.727 




Interest 




55,110 




55.110 




55.110 




1,112.430 




1,269.248 


69 


Indirect Expenses Subtotal 




1,310.039 




1.315.039 




1,315,039 


$ 


2,612,550 


$ 


2,848,058 




Total Expenses - Water 


$ 


3,042,439 


$ 


3,047,439 


$ 


2,934,639 


$ 


2,993,518 


$ 


3,283,534 




Total Budget - Water Enterprise Fund 


$ 


3,468,086 


$ 


3,453,304 


% 


3,340,504 












Funded by Water Revenue 














$ 


5,006,421 


$ 


5,548,571 




TOTAL WATER & SEWER BUDGET 


$ 


5,697,630 


$ 


5,668,066 


$ 


5,555,266 



157 



Department Administrator Finance Committee Finance CommKtee 
Approp. Approp. It. Requested Recommended Recommended Contingent 
FY'08 FY'09 No. FY'10 ' FY10 FY'10 FY10 













WAucS - BuiloinQS & Grounds 
















1,500 




1,500 




Overtime 




1 ,500 




1,500 




1,500 












Psrt-Tims Ldbor 




















JO 1 ,«7kJfT 




Pprcnnnpl 




136 001 




1 16 219 




1 16 219 


























$ 


130,664 


$ 


133,059 


70 


Total Salaries - Buildings & Grounds 


9 


— TTT" — 
137,501 




117,719 




$ 


117,719 












cXPcNScS - Buildings & Grounds 
















' 








Board Expenses 
















10.000 




10,000 




OperatinQ Expenses & Supplies 




1 A AAA 
lU.UOU 




10,000 




10,000 




7,000 




7,000 




Equipfnent Maintenance 




7,000 




7,000 




7,000 




1,000 




1,000 




Unifonns 




600 




600 




800 


$ 


18,C00 


$ 


18,000 


71 


Total Expenses - Buildings & Grounds 


$ 


17,600 


$ 


17,600 


$ 


17,600 


$ 


148,664 


$ 


151,059 




Total DUd96t - DPW Buildings oi Grounds 


* 


155,101 


$ 


135,319 


$ 


135,319 












SrcCIAL ACCOUNTS 
















4,000 




4,000 




Snaae Trees 




4,000 




4,000 




4,000 




25,000 




10,000 




Contract Work - trees 




5.000 




5,000 




5,000 




50,000 




79,450 




Contract Work - grass 




88,450 




68,450 




88,450 




10,000 




10,000 




Contract Patctiing 




8,000 




8,000 




8,000 




1 v,UUU 












*\ 

o,uuu 




Ann 




C AAA 








40 000 












Afl AAA 












4 A AAA 




Lesf Disposal 




1 3,000 




13,000 




13,000 


$ 


139,000 


$ 


163,450 


72 


Total Budget - D.P.W. Special Accts. 


$ 


163,450 


$ 


163,450 


$ 


163,450 


* 




c 






TOTAL PUBLIC WORKS 


t 


6 578 171 


c 




« 














RECREATION 
























Coordinator 
























Director 
















35,000 




35,000 




Ottier Salaries 




31,500 




31.500 




31,500 




35,000 




35,000 


73 


Total Salaries 




31,500 




31,500 




31,500 




1,000 








Office Expenses 
























Travel 
















2.500 








Program Expenses 
















3,500 






74 


Total Expenses 
















38,500 


$ 


35,000 




Total Recreation Budget 




31,500 


$ 


31,500 


$ 


31,500 



158 



Department Administrator Finance Committee Finance Committee 





Approp. 




Approp. 


It 






Recommended 




r\lr 1 n 1 1 It* 11 U 




ri Uo 




CV'AQ 


no> 




n f 1 w 




ri lU 




FY'10 


























45,694 




40,DOf 




Director 


A^O CAR 
40,040 




43,648 




43 648 




15,735 




13,507 




Outreach Worker 


iU,ro4 




10,764 




1U,/D4 




io,no 




T<i,y f f 




van unver 






13,622 








74,542 




75,171 


75 


Total Salaries 


68.034 




68,034 




68,034 




12,200 




17,172 


76 


Program Coordinator 


14,734 




15,000 




15,000 




27,600 






77 


Expenses 


OO RCift 




22,600 








1 14,342 




1 14,94^ 




Totai Council on AginQ Budget 


^ lUd,4lo 


$ 


105,634 


e 
9 


lUD,D04 












VETERANS' SERVICE 














9,308 




9,308 


78 


Director's Salary 


9.308 




9,308 




9,308 




250 




250 




Office Expenses 


150 




150 




150 




1,500 




1,500 




Memorial Day 


1,500 




1,500 




1,500 




450 




450 




Veterans' Day 


350 




450 




450 




2,200 




2 200 


79 


Tntal Fyn^n^p^ 


2 000 




9 Inn 




2 100 




5,800 




5,800 


80 


Assistance 


5,500 




^ c;nn 




5,500 


s 


17,308 


% 


17,308 




Total Veteran's Budget 


$ 18,808 


) 


16,908 


$ 


16,908 












Maturinq Debt 






















NON-SEWER DEBT SERVICE 














3,461,078 




3,293,227 




Principal 


3,625,825 




3,625.825 




3,625,825 




1,783,207 




1,669,306 




Interest 


1,757.780 




1,757.780 




1,757,760 












Temporary Loans - Interest 














45,000 




45,000 




Certification of Notes/Bonds 


30,000 




30.000 




30.000 












Contingent Appropriation 












$ 


5,289,285 


$ 


5,007,533 


81 


Tot. Budget-Non-Sewer Debt Serv. 


$ 5,413,605 


$ 


5,413,605 


$ 


5,413,605 



SEWER DEBT SERVICE 





1,004.491 




1,034.968 




Principal 




1,066.101 




1,066,101 


1,066.101 




113,227 




95.136 




Interest 




75,655 




75,655 


75.655 




9,524 




8,211 




Administrative Fees/Charges 




6,825 




6,825 


6.825 


$ 


1,127,242 


$ 


1,138,315 


82 


Total Budget - Sewer Debt Service 


$ 


1,148,581 


$ 


1,148,581 $ 


1,148,581 


$ 


6,416,527 


$ 


6,145,848 




TOTAL MATURING DEBT 


$ 


6,562,186 


$ 


6,562,186 $ 


6,562,186 












LIBRARY 














61,912 




63,770 




Director 




65,364 




65,364 


65.364 




44,682 




46,023 




Assistant Director 




47,174 




47,174 


47.174 




16,937 




19,448 




Secretary/Booki<eeper 




18,876 




18.876 


18.876 




44,556 




46,189 




Children's Librarian 




48,274 




48,274 


48.274 




41,287 




42,543 




Circulation Librarian 




44,044 




44,044 


44.044 




44,386 




49,522 




Reference Librarian 




44,044 




44,044 


44.044 




23,592 




24,310 




Cataloger 




25,169 




25,169 


25,169 




31,890 




36,693 




Library Assistants 




36,059 




36,059 


36,059 




34,328 




40,652 




Adult Assistants (part-time) 




22,000 




27,500 


27,500 




19,612 




23,573 




AV Processors 




22,666 




22,666 


22,666 












Pages 














30,500 




15,443 




Otiier Compensation 




15,576 




15,576 


15.576 




393,682 




408,166 


83 


Total Salaries 




389,246 




394,746 


394,746 




1.500 




1.500 




Office Expenses 




1,200 




1,200 


1,200 




35.000 




30,000 




Building Expenses 




30,000 




34,000 


34,000 




400 




400 




Travel 




400 




400 


400 




36,900 




31,900 


84 


Total Expenses 




31,600 




35,600 


35,600 




110,989 




119.700 


85 


Library Materials 




121,000 




125,000 


125,000 


$ 


541.571 


$ 


559,766 




Total Library Budget 


$ 


541,846 


$ 


555,346 $ 


555,346 



159 















Department 


Administrator 


Finance Committee 


Finance Committee 




Approp. 




Approp. 


It. 




Requested 


Recommended 




Recommended 


Contingent 




FV08 




FY'09 


No. 




FY'10 




FY'10 




FYMO 


FY10 












UNCLASSIFIED 
















3,500 




3,500 


86 


Town Reports 


3,500 




3,000 




3,000 






29,500 




29,500 


87 


Telephones (most Depts.) 


29,500 




29.500 




29,500 






145,000 




165,000 


88 


Street Lighting 


175,000 




175.000 




175,000 






155,000 




176,750 


89 


Reserve Fund 


165,000 




157,500 




182.500 


- 




42,000 




45,000 


90 


Audit 


47,500 




47.500 




47,500 






800 




800 


91 


Historical Commission 


800 




800 




800 






340,000 




355,000 


92 


Medicare Tax 


365,650 




365,650 




365.650 






55,000 




70,000 


93 


Stabilization Fund 


70,000 




50.000 




50.000 






26,584 




15,000 




Unemployment 


30,000 




- 




- 










25,000 


94 


Town Building Study Committee 














> 


1 at iJO't 


« 


ooc ccn 








% 


828,950 


$ 


853,950 














Schools 
















273,400 


$ 


290,885 


95 


REGIONAL VOCATIONAL SCHOOL 


$ 319,885 


% 


394,091 


$ 


394,091 












96 


SCHOOLS - SWAMPSCOTT 
















21,443,389 




22.200,000 




Total Budget 


22.700,000 




22,600,000 




22.600,000 














Less Anticipated Rev.-Nahant, Metco, ... 














$ 


21,443,389 


$ 


22,200,000 




Net Budget 


$ 22,700,000 


% 


22,600,000 


$ 


22,600,000 




$ 


21,718,789 


$ 


22,490,885 




TOTAL SCHOOLS 


$23,019,885 


% 


22,994,091 




22,994,091 




$ 


51,425,491 


$ 


52,952,394 




GRAND TOTAL BUDGEr 


$ 54,019,664 


% 


53,956,618 


$ 


53,868,818 





'Excludes Non Appropriated Expenses (i.e. Slate Assessments S Assessor's Overlay) ofS1,122.4S5 

Total Town Budget including State Assessments and Assessor's Overlay and Net of Water/Sewer= $49,523,507 



160 



ARTICLE 28. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from the Surplus Revenue Account of the 

Sewer Enterprise Fund to the account of Current Revenue the sum of $150,000 to be used and applied 
by the Board of Selectmen in the reduction of the sewer rate, or take any action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the Selectmen 

Comment: Surplus revenue is money not set aside for any special purpose. It results from 
the difference between estimates and actual receipts of sewer user fees and other revenues plus 
unexpended funds from the sewer department's budget. This is normally surplus revenue 
available for Town Meeting to be used to reduce rates for the coming year. 

The Finance Committee recommends that the Town vote to approve this Article. 



Article 28 
Majority Vote 
5/6/09 



ARTICLE 29. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate and raise, by borrowing or otherwise, 

under any general or special law which authorizes the Town to raise money, by borrowing or othenwise, 
such sums of money as may be necessary for any and ail of the purposes mentioned in the foregoing 
articles, or take any action relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Board of Selectmen 



The Finance Committee will report on this Article at Town Meeting. 



Article 29 

Indefinite postponed 
5/6/09 



161 



Hereof fail not and nnake return of this Warrant with your doings thereon at the time and place of said 
meeting. 

Given under our hand this 7th day of April, 2009 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 




162 



The Town of Swampscott 
Town Warrant 
May 2009 



SS. 

To either of the Constables of the Town of Swampscott 
GREETINGS: 

In the name of the Commonwealth, you are hereby required to notify and warn the inhabitants of 
said town that a Special Town Meeting will be held on Monday, May 4, 2009, beginning at 8:00 P.M. in 
the Swampscott High School Auditorium located at 200 Essex Street, Swampscott. 



163 



2009 SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 

Return of Service 

Pursuant to the within warrant to be directed, I have notified the inhabitants of the Town of 
Swampscott, qualified to vote in elections and in town affairs, by posting an attested copy 
thereof at the Town Administration Building, at the Post Office and at least two public and 
conspicuous places in each precinct in the Town, and at or in the immediate vicinity of the 
Swampscott Railroad Station. Said posting was done on April 16, 2009 and not less than seven 
days before the date appointed for said meeting. 

Attest: Paul Minsky 
Constable of Swampscott 

Mailing of Warrants 

The Warrant for the Special Town Meeting was mailed to Town Meeting Representatives on April 1 6, 
2009. Copies of the warrant were available, free of charge, for any interested person at the 
Town Administration Building. 



NOTICE OF SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 
MONDAY. MAY 4. 2009. 8:00 P.M. 



To the Town Meeting Members: 

Notice Is hereby given In accordance with Article II, Section 2, of the Bylaws of the Town of Swampscott 
that a Special Town Meeting will be held on Monday, May 4, 2009, beginning at 8:00 p.m. in the 
Swampscott High School Auditorium located at 200 Essex Street, Swampscott. Moderator Martin C. 
Goldman, Esquire, will preside. 

Susan J. Duplin 
Town Clerk 

Meeting Certifications 

The Special Town Meeting of May 4, 2009 was called to order at 8:05 p.m. in the Swampscott High 
School Auditorium located at 200 Essex Street with the necessary quorum being present (163). At 8:10 
p.m. it was voted, unanimously, to dissolve the Special Town Meeting. 

Attendance: 

For the Special Town Meeting attendance, by precinct, see the list at the end of this report. 



164 



To the Town Meeting Members: 



Notice is hereby given in accordance with Article II, Section 2, of the Bylaws of the Town of 
Swampscott that a Special Town Meeting will be held on Monday, May 4, 2009, beginning at 8:00 p.m. in 
the Swampscott High School Auditorium located at 200 Essex Street, Swampscott. 

Moderator Martin C. Goldman, Esquire, will preside. 



165 



Special Town Meeting opened May 4, 2009 at 8:00 PM. 



ARTICLE 1. To see if the Town will vote to reduce departmental expenses already 

appropriated under Article 24 of the 2008 Annual Town Meeting, for the purpose of covering reductions in 
Fiscal 2009 State Local Aid, or otherwise amend said vote, or take any other action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the Board of Selectmen 



The Finance Committee will report on this Article at Town Meeting. 



DEPARTMENT 


ACCOUNT 
NAME 


REDUCTION 


Budget 
Line 
Item 


Assessor's 


Clerical 


5,685 


22 




OCL-ICKJI y 


1 Q 097 


O 1 


Insurance 


P&C 


15,000 


52 




r Y W 1 Kl 1 t M 






DPW 


Forennan 


5,803 


58 




Working 






Cennetery 


Forennan 


5,803 


70 


Recreation 


Aux Staff 


1,395 


73 


COA 




5,000 


75 


Debt 




269,000 


81 


Library 




5,000 


83 


School 








Department 




94,192 


96 






426,105 





Article 1, 
Majority Vote 
5/4/09 STM 

Motion made and seconded to dissolve Special Town Meeting at 8:10 PM. 
Majority Vote 
5/4/09 STM 



166 



Hereof fail not and make return of this Warrant with your doings thereon at the time and place of said 
meeting. 

Given under our hand this 7th day of April, 2009 




167 



APPENDIX A 



ARTICLE XIV: REGISTRATION AND ENFORCEMENT OF ALARM SYSTEMS 
Section 1 : Definitions 

A. Alarm Company is a person or business that sells, provides, monitors, maintains, services, repairs, alters, 
replaces, moves or installs an alarm system. This includes an individual or business that installs an alarm 
system for their private or proprietary facilities. 

B. Alarm Officer is a designee of the Police Department or Fire Department responsible for administration of 
the alarm program. The Alarm Officer is charged with the responsibility of reviewing alarm activations, 
service fee billing, reporting on problematic alarm systems and serving as a resource to the community. 

C. Alarm System is a device or series of devices that emit or transmit a remote or local audible, visual or 
electronic signal indicating an alarm has been activated and is intended or is likely to result in the 
summoning of police services or fure services. This does not include an alarm installed in a vehicle unless 
the vehicle is permanently located at the site. 

D. Alarm User is any homeowner, renter, lessee, or other resident and any renter, lessee, or owner of a 
business or other establishment or building (other than a government facility) who is primarily responsible 
for an alarm system and/or an activation of the alarm system. 

E. Alarm Verification is an alarm that has been independently verified by a third party other than the Police 
Department or Fire Department confirming that the alarm was activated as the result of a crime or incident 
requiring the police to investigate. 

F. Automatic Voice Dialer is any electronic, mechanical or other device that, when activated, automatically 
contacts the Police Department or Fire Department by telephone, radio or other means requesting police 
services through a prerecorded message or other automated system. 

G. Cancellation is the notification of the Police Department by the person, who initially requests police 
response to a non-High Risk Alarm activation, that the situation does not require a police response. 

H. Contact Person is one or more individuals, or a private business, that can respond to the alarm location to 
assist police and fire services to thoroughly inspect the property, secure unlocked doors and windows, 
deactivate or reset an alarm, and/or take responsibility for protected property. 

L False Burglar Alarm is any alarm where a responding officer(s), having completed a timely investigation of 
the alarm site, finds no reasonable evidence of a criminal offense. False alarms include avoidable alarms 
whereby the alarm activation caused by non-criminal behavior could have been avoided with simple 
preventative measures. 



168 



J. False Fire Alarm is any alarm where responding firefighters, having completed a timely investigation of the 
alarm site, find no reasonable evidence of a fire. False alarms include avoidable alarms whereby the alarm 
activation caused by non-fire behavior could have been avoided with simple preventative measures. 

K. Fire Alarm Malfunctionrsl include operation of a faulty smoke or heat detection device, a faulty control 
panel or associated equipment, a water pressure surge in automatic sprinkler equipment, accidental 
operations of an automatic sprinkler system, an action by an employee of the owner or occupant of the 
protected premises or a contractor employed by the owner or the occupant, causing accidental activation of 
the internal fire alarm. 

L. High Risk Alarms mclude panic, duress, silent, robbery, hold-up and/or any similarly labeled alarm that 
suggests the alarm has been manually activated and a crime is in progress or there is some other life 
threatening event. High Risk Alarms also include commercial establishments such as gas stations, banks, 
jewelry stores and/or businesses with cash or valuables commonly victimized by robbery or commercial 
thefts. 

M. Nuisance Alarm is any alarm that activates repeatedly and/or xmnecessarily within the same 24-hour period, 
emits an outside audible that does not reset after 10 minutes, emits an outside audible that sounds more than 
twice fi-om the same activation, and/or when the Chief of Police or Fire Chief, or a designee, determines the 
alarm is a nuisance due to a violation(s) of these rules and regulations. 

N. Malicious False Alarm is any intentional activation of a fire alarm system not resulting fi-om an actual fire 
or emergency. 

Section 2 : Automatic Voice Dialers Prohibited 

Alarm Users shall be prohibited from using, and Alarm Companies shall be prohibited from installing, automatic 
voice dialers. 

Section 3 : Alarm Registration 

A. Alarm Systems in the Town of Swampscott shall be registered with the appropriate department(s) annually 
between January 1 and January 15. Any subsequent changes to the registration information shall be 
reported promptly. 

B. Required Information : 

1. The address and telephone number of the alarmed property; 

2. The resident's name or business name at the alarmed property; 

3. If different, the name, address and telephone number of the person(s) or business responsible for 
any alarm activation; and 

4. The name(s) of a Contact Person(s), able to respond to secure the property or prevent additional 
False Alarms. 

C. The Alarm User shall be responsible for ensuring that an Alarm System that is under their control and 
located within Swampscott is registered with the appropriate department(s). 

D. An Alarm Company that monitors an Alarm System located in Swampscott with the pxupose of reporting 
alarm activations to the Police Department or Fire Department may register that alarm on behalf of an 
Alarm User. If registering ten (10) or more Alarm Systems, the list shall be provided in alphabetical order 
by name. The Alarm Company shall notify the appropriate department of any new or removed Alarm 
Systems or when there has been a change to ttie required registration information. 



169 



An Alarm Company shall ensure that each Alarm System monitored by them is properly registered. 
Without confirmation that an Alarm System is properly registered, Alarm Verification shall be required 
prior to reporting the alarm activation to the Swampscott Police Department or Fire Department. 

E. An Alarm System that is not monitored by an Alarm Company that produces a local audible, visual or 
electronic signal indicating an alarm has been activated and is intended or is likely to result in the 
summoning of police or fire services shall be required to be registered by the Alarm User. 

F. Alarm Registration Fee . The annual fee for registering an alarm is $10 for residential alarms and $25 for 
commercial alarms. 

G. No Registration Required if the residence or business has no local audible, visual or electronic signal that 
alerts a neighbor or passing person that an alarm has been activated and for other types of alarms where the 
Alarm User or Alarm Company provides Alarm Verification. In these instances, no False Alarm will be 
reported to the Police Department or Fire Department. 

Section 4 : Duties of the Alarm User 

A. An Alarm User shall : 

1. Ensure that the alarm is properly registered. 

2. ^ Ensure that the Alarm System is properly installed and maintained to minimize or eliminate False 

Alarms (including equipment that prevents False Alarms during regional power outages and 
severe storms). 

3. Set the Alarm System so that the audible signal sounds for no longer than ten (10) minutes after 
being activated. The alarm shall be programmed to sound or cycle not more than twice during any 
smgle activation. The Alarm User shall not intentionally cause a False Alarm resulting in a public 
safety response to the alarm site. 

B. Alarm User Guidelines 

1 . If two False Alarms are received in a calendar year, the Alarm System should 
be inspected, repaired if needed, and/or the Alarm User(s) should receive additional training 
in the use of the Alarm System. 

2. Ensure that all persons who may activate the alarm are properly trained in the use of the 
Alarm System and/or have the means to disarm and rearm the Alarm System without causing a False 
Alarm. 

Section 5 : Duties of the Alarm Company 

A. An Alarm Company shall : 

1 . Clearly distinguish High Risk Alarms when reporting alarm activation to the Police Department. 
High Risk Alarms will be given a high priority public safety response. 



2. When reporting an alarm activation, provide, to the extent possible: the nature of the alarm; Alarm 
User's name and the address, die address where the alarm was activated, and any other pertinent 
information that may assist police officers to safely investigate the alarm. 



170 



3. Report an alarm Cancellation to the proper public safety department as soon as it is learned that a 
response is not required. Cancellations received prior to arrival of public safety personnel shall not 
result in a service fee. 

B. Alarm Company Guidelines : 

1. The Alarm Company shall install Alarm Systems that meet current industry standards and offer 
Alarm Users written and oral instructions as to the proper use of the system. The Alarm Company 
should make regular maintenance, upgrades and remedial training available to the Alarm Users. 

Section 6 : False Alarm Service Fee 

A. Residential . An alarm service fee of $60 (sixty dollars) shall be assessed on the third and each subsequent 
false alarm in a calendar year. 

B. Non-Residential and High Risk Alarms . An alarm service fee of $80 (eighty dollars) shall be assessed on 
the third and each subsequent false alarm in a calendar year. 

C. Malicious False Alarm . An alarm service fee of $150 (one hundred and fifty dollars) shall be assessed for 
the first and subsequent alarms. 

D. All False Alarm activations that occur in one calendar day will be counted as one False Alarm. 

E. Alarm Users shall be billed once a month for the previous month's False Alarm activity. All service fees 
assessed shall be paid to the Town of Swampscott for deposit in the general fund. 

If a bill is not paid within thirty (30) days, a second notice will be sent. If the bill is not paid after another 
thirty-day period, a final notice will be sent informing the owner and/or occupant that court proceedmgs 
will commence. 

F. When possible, the Police Department shall leave notice of each False Alarm activation at the residence or 
business of the Alarm User and provide a written letter of warning in response to the second False Alarm. 

G. Alarm service fees are not subject to appeal. However, the Police Chief or Fire Chief, Alarm Officer or 
their designees shall accept written documentation that outlines mitigating circumstances for the False 
Alarms and the measures bemg taken by the Alarm User to prevent fiiture False Alarms. The Chief of 
Police or Fire Chief shall be authorized to waive service fees. 

H. An Alarm User with five (5) or more alarm service fees, unpaid for a period of six months, will be given a 
"FINAL" written notice of the fees owed. The Alarm User has fourteen (14) days to make full payment; 
otherwise the Alarm User is subject to an additional fitne. 

Section 7 : Confidentiality 

The Town recognizes that it is subject to the requirements of the Public Records Law, G.L. c.66, §10. However, in 
the interest of public safety, it is the intention of the Town, to the extent permitted by law, to maintain confidentially 
personal information and infirastructure information regarding Alarm Systems including, but not limited to, that 
specifically identifying the location, operations, or other proprietary information contained in alarm registrations. 

Section 8 : Government Immunity 

Alarm System registration is not intended to, nor shall it, create a contract, duty or obligation, either expressed or 
implied, of response. Any and all liability resulting from the failure to respond to a notification is hereby 
disclaimed; governmental immunity, as provided by law, is retained. When registering an alarm, the Alarm User 
and the Alarm Company shall acknowledge that law enforcement or fire services response may be influenced by 



171 



factors such as, but not limited to: the availability of police ujiits or fire units; priority of calls; weather conditions; 
traffic conditions; emergency conditions; and staffing levels. 

Section 9 : Enforcement 

Any person who violates any provision of Sections 2, 3, 4A, and 5A of this By-law shall be guilty of a separate 
offense for each day or portion of a day during which the violation is committed, continued, or pennitted. Penalties 
for violation of this By-law shall be as follows: $50 for the first offense in a calendar year; $100 for the second 
offense in a calendar year; and $300 for the third and subsequent offenses in a calendar year. No person shall incur 
penalties in excess of $750 in any one calendar year under this section. 

This by-law may be enforced by any means available in law or in equity, including non-criminal disposition in 
accordance with G.L. c.40, §2 ID and Article XI, Section 2 of the Town By-laws. In addition to the enforcing 
authorities identified in said Article, any police officer of the Town or the Fire Chief or his designee shall be 
authorized to enforce this Bylaw. 



1 . Appropriation Amount: Not Applicable 

2. Funding: Not Applicable 

3. Indicate department priority in relation to your requests: Not Applicable 

4. Justification Narrative: Historically a very small minority of alarm activations involve criminal conduct. 
This proposed bylaw is an effort to provide some regulatory oversight in the interests of public safety. The 
by-law provides a more stringent policy for repeated, false burglar and/or fire alarms. 



Article 5. 
Majority Vote. 
5/4/09 ATM 



172 



APPENDIX F 



REPORT OF THE SWAMPSCOTT 
CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT COMMITTEE 
FISCAL YEAR 2010 

January 31, 2009 

Cynthia C. Merkle, Chair 
David Bowen 
Gino Cresta 
Joe Markarian 
Walter Newhall 

Andrew IVIaylor (Non-Voting) 



GENERAL 



The Swampscott Capital Improvement Committee (CIC) is currently required by the town by-laws to: (1) 
study all proposed capital improvement projects and purchases for Town Meeting; (2) prepare a capital 
improvement budget for the next fiscal year; (3) prepare a five-year capital improvement plan; (4) report 
its findings and recommendations to the finance committee; and (5) submit a report to the Swampscott 
Town Meeting that presents its conclusions. 

The CIC has met regularly in an effort to formulate an appropriate recommendation that takes into 
consideration these difficult economic times. The CIC reports that it has accomplished these goals 
through collaboration with the finance committee, board of selectmen, school department and town 
administrator. 

Beginning in October of 2008, the CIC reviewed capital expenditure requests from the various 
town departments for FY10. Utilizing a format for gathering relevant information, the CIC was also able to 
develop an outlook at potential capital expenditures over a five-year period into the future. This outlook, 
however, does not yet include any recommendations that might emerge from the School Master Plan 
Committee. As those recommendations evolve, they will be incorporated into the outlook. 

Therefore, the Swampscott Capital Improvement Committee respectfully submits its FY10 report 
to the Swampscott Town Meeting. 

Warrant Articles for FY2010 



173 



The CIC received eighteen (18) departmental requests, which met the definition of a capital expenditure. 
The associated total dollar cost was $$2,595,550. Under town by-laws, to qualify as a capital 
expenditure, a requested purchase or project must have a cost of at least $20,000 and have an 
anticipated useful life of at least three years. Each request was evaluated by the CIC on its own merits 
and was measured against requests of other departments based on information provided. All requests 
were reviewed in the context of town-wide needs and priorities. 

Final recommendations for capital expenditures in FY10 fall within the town's funding capacity comply 
with the guidelines established in capital program policies and represent the collective deliberations of the 
CIC. 



CIC Recommendations 

Table 1, attached, shows the capital expenditures recommended by the CIC for approval by the May 
2009 annual Town Meeting. In the CIC evaluation, requests were initially and informally ranked based on 
the following criteria: 

Is the expenditure necessary to address public health or safety issues; 

Is the expenditure legally required (e.g., the result of a court judgment); 

Is the expenditure necessary to avert a potential liability (e.g., to comply with ADA 
requirements); 

Is the expenditure necessary to secure a grant, a loan or to receive other matching funds; 

Will the expenditure increase future town operating expenses or require the addition of 
new staff; 

Is the expenditure cost effective (e.g., does the request fully complete a project or reflect 
a piecemeal funding approach); 

Does the expenditure benefit a small, large or special group of residents; 

Does the expenditure have aesthetic value. 

The CIC recommends that 11 of the 18 departmental requests be approved by Town Meeting. Of 
$913,000 in proposed total expenditures, $470,000 would be funded through general obligation bonds 
and repaid, over time, through the tax levy. The remaining $443,000 would be financed by other sources, 
as follows: 

> $233,000 for road paving improvements through a State Chapter 90 grant. 

> $185,000 for the replacement of a sewer jetter to be funded by the Sewer Enterprise Fund. 

> $25,000 for the pumper station lift improvements funded by the Sewer Enterprise Fund. 

One request that was seriously considered was the purchase of an Engine Truck for $550,000. As you 
may recall at the 2008 Town Meeting the CIC recommended and the Town Meeting approved a capital 
exclusion for $300,000 for the purchase of a new Engine. Subsequent to the meeting, we learned that the 
Fire Department felt that the funds would be insufficient by approximately $75,000 to purchase an 
appropriate engine. As such the Selectmen did not approve the capital exclusion request going forward to 
the voters. 

The CIC does believe the Town is in need of a new Engine. However, we believe that, more research is 
required of the Fire Department on the type of engine needed, as other local towns have been able to 



174 



make purchases substantially below the $550,000 that was requested in this budget cycle. We are 
committed to working with the Fire Department over the coming months to determine a more appropriate 
level of expenditure for a purchase and would revisit the subject at the next Town meeting, either in the 
fall of 2009 or spring of 2010. 

Finally, the CIC has also included a warrant article for the funding of a design for the Police Station as 
well as the formation of a Building Committee. The CIC will be prepared to discuss these 
recommendations in detail at the Town Meeting, 

Respectfully Submitted. 
The CIC Committee 



175 



2009 Town Meeting 



Pre Name May 4, 2009 May 6, 2009 



Abrams, Alan 






Adams, Ryan 




X 


Baldacci, Richard R 


X 


X 


Bartlett-Genest Lee 


X 


X 


Bates, Wallace T. 


X 


X 


Blonder, Jeffrey S 




i 


Briones Jorge A Jr 


X 


iX 


Buchanan, Susan 


X 


iX 


Byron-Adams rvlichelle 




i 


Cassidy, John 


X 




Chavez, Robert 


X 


|X 


Cresta, Gino A Jr 


:x 




Dandreo, Robert 


x 




Davis Jeremy 


X 


iX 


DiPietro, Ross 






Finlay Patricia 


X 


X 


Green Eileen 




X 


Griffin, Alice 


X 


ix 


:Hartmann, Eric 




ix 


'Hartmann, Marianne 


|X 


ix 


; Hayes, Jeanne 






Hubauer, Shawn 






Hyde, Sally A 


x 




Hyde, William R Sr 


X 




Johnson Maryalice 


X 




Karametsopoulos Maria 


X 


X 


Kearney Sheila 


X 


X 


Kessler, Nelson 


X 


X 


LeBlanc Dean 


X 


X 


Lombard James 




X 


Marston, Denise 




X 


McMann Gary 


X 


X 


Mentuck Douglas 


X 


X 


Miles, Chris 


X 


X 


Miles, Denise 






Montague, Neil 


X 


X 


Patalano, Raymond 


X 


X 


Patrikis, Theodore A. 




X 


Picariello, John A 


X 


X 


Picariello, Lawrence 


X 


X 


Pierce Todd 


X 




Powell Sally 


X 


X 


Pulos, Victoria 


X 


X 


Rizzo, Carole 


X 


X 


Rooks, Norma H 


X 


X 


Schultz, Hugh (Jim) 


X 


X 


Scott, Digna 


X 


x 


Serine, Michael A 






Serino, Robert 




X 


Shannon Cynthia 


X 


X 


Shannon, Collin 






Speranza, Frances 




:X 


Whittier, Douglas 




;x 



2009 ATM/STM Attendance ! 

176 



2009 Town Meeting 



Pre Name 


May 4, 2009 


May 6, 2009 


2 Amore, Anthony 






9 Rarrlpn Fiinpnp 


X 


X 


9 Rapik 1 i^a (^arrinpin 






9 Rnwpn Dflviri 


X 


X 


9 r^annprnn .lanpll A 

^ Nk^CII 1 Id ul 1 , well I^M 


X 


X 


9 Haron Mark R 


X 


X 


2 Casella, Mark 


X 




2 Chaisson Ellen 


ix 


IX 


2 Chaisson George E 


X 


ix 


2 Coooer Robin 






2 Crimmlns Joseph 


x 


ix 


? dirrv Martha 


X 


X 


7 Dnhprtv inhn 1 


X 


X 


? Dunn liirlith F 


X 




? Eirhlpr Tanis 


X 


X 




. 


X 


2 HampI Grpoa "J" 


X 


X 


2 Hebert Donald 


ix 


X 


2 Hebert Janet 


X 


X 


2 Hunt Stpnhpn 






2 Jankson L nrene 


X 


'x 


2 Jaf:k<?on William 


X 




2 Jones, Patrick 


X 


X 


2 Marcou, Martha L 




ix 


2 McHugh, Donna 


X 




2 Morrell Aaatha 


X 


X 


2 Morris George 


X 




? Miilvpv Efiward 






2 Murnhv Rrian C 






2 Newhall Linda A 


X 


Ix 


2 Newhall Walter 


X 


ix 


2 Palleschi Edward 


X 




2 Pinkerton Don 


X 


ix 


9 Pitman Mirh^pl 


Y 




? Ramstinp Patriri?3 Karama^; 

to l\Cllll«^tlll^) 1 dLIIWiCl [\CIIClll(CIO 


X 


X 


2 Reardon Ellen M 


X 




2 Richmond, David E 






2 Romano, John L 


X 


X 


2 Rosenberg, Gail 


X 


X 


? ■ Riiaaipro John 


Ix 


y 


2 ■ Ryan Leah 


X 


X 


2 Schultz, Jackson 


Ix 


Ix 


2 Schultz, Nancy 






2 Scibelli, Anthony A 


X 


ix 


? Shanahan Jo«?pnh F Ir 


X 


ix 


2 Snrit7 Wavnp 


ix 


ix 


2 Strati*?^ Danipllp 


X 




2 Strauss Joshua A 


X 


X 


2 Strauss, Matthew 


'x 


x 


2 Voael Kri<?ten 


■X 


iA 


2 Voael John 

to , V wi f u III 


ix 


1 


2 Whalen, Michael 


ix 


|x 


2 Whelan David Jr 


'x 




2 IZamansky Elizabeth Belkin 


X 




2009 ATM/STM Attendance 




1 



177 



2009 Town Meeting 


Pre Name 




iviay 4, ^uuu May o, zuu^ 


3 Barden, Gary 


X 


X 


3 Bogardus, Deborah 


:X 




3 Breen, Kevin F 


X 




3 Breen, Leslie A 






3 Cardenas Patricia 


X 


X 


3 Cliampagne-0 Keefe Donna 


X 


X 


3 Colella, Angelo 






3 Colella, Sandra 






3 Coletti, John M 






v5 LfOrmier, tsamieen 


Y 

A 


V 

A 


3 Dandreo, Dame! J III 






3 Davey Maryann 


X 


X 


3 Davis, Deborah 


X 


:X 


3 DePaolo Jan 


X 


X 


3 Domelowicz, Joseph J. Jr 


X 


X 


3 Donaher Karen 


X 


X 


3 Donaher, Kevin 


V 
A 


A 


o Unscoll, Anne 


V 
A 


X 


3 Eldridge, Barbara F 


X 


x 


v) tidndge, ocott 


A 


■ V 

iX 


3 Esteverena Catherine 


x 


X 


3 Fitzhenry George 


X 


X 


3 Fox, Deborah 






3 Fraser, Dana 


X 




3 Frenkel, Lenora 


X 




3 Frenkel, Richard 


X 


X 


3 Gallagher, Tara 


X 


X 


3 Grimes, Daniel 


X 


X 


3 Hilario Joan 


x 


X 


3 Jones, Patricia A 


' V 
A 


V 
A 


3 Kelleher, Martha G 


x 


X 


3 : Legere, Carol 






3 Lincoln Loring B Jr 




X 


3 ; Lincoln, Maria F 




X 


3 Luke Gerald 




X 


3 Lundstrom Linda 


X 


X 


3 Magee, Kathleen 






3 Meister Thelma Young 


X 


X 


3 Moltz Sandra 


X 


X 


3 Moss, Connie 


X 


X 


3 ■ Moss, Evan 


" V 
.A 




3 Penyack, Jonathan 


X 


X 


3 Perry, Gerard 


X 


X 


3 Pilotte Denis 


X 


X 


3 Sachs-Freeman, Barbara 






3 Small, Fred 






3 Smith Richard 


X 




3 Spellios, Peter A 


X 


X 


3 Thomsen, Maureen 


X 


X 


3 Turner, Stephen 






3 Weaver David 




X 


o weDSter, Mary 


V 
A 




3 Welch Thomas 


V 

A 


i V 

'A 


3 Wright, Suzanne 


X 


X 


2009 ATM/STM Attendance 







178 



2009 Town Meeting 



Pre Name May 4, 2009 May 6, 2009 



A 


Dol/'ar 1 or^af Kl 
DdlV^I} Jdllcl IN 


y 


Y 


A 
H 


Ddlbdiild, JUo^piI J 


Y 


Y 

A 


A 
H 


DdlUt^il, IVIaJU 


j\ 


Y 

A 


4 


Rrnwn Rarhpl 


X 




A 


DIUWII, /Al lUI C/W 


V 


X 


4 


r^all?ihfln Inhn 

wciiicii lai 1 II 1 


X 


X 


4 


r^i inninnham t^^llv/ 
1 II III 1^ I icii 1 [, r\oi ty 


X 


■X 


4 


L/oiioUlli, ivicii LI Id 


V 


■ #\ 


4 


UdWit^y inuilldo 


y 


Y 


4 


L>w^i luiu, ividi y n 




X 

A 


4 


^^^^onfn William R 
L/IIVIclllU, VVIIIIdlM rx 


Y 


Y 

i A 


4 


uuiicJdM, r\uum L c 






4 


L'UlltlclllcjiU 




.A 


4 


LJic;cUt;lI, iNdUilll 


Y 


^ Y 

-A 


4 


L/l Ul 1 11 1 lUI lUf DJIdll 


Y 
yv 


iy 

: A 


4 


LJi Ul [III lUi lU, died Ivl 


Y 


^Y 

•A 


4 


1 dIUU, IVMv^lldc;l 




Y 

A 


4 


1 liUIIIdll, INdllcUti rx 


:y 

yv 


Y 

A 


4 




X 


X 


4 


finiidrppij f^nnnip 


X 




4 


Olc;^lldll, r\dUllct;i[ IVI 


;Y 

'A 


Y 

.A 


4 


nuWc;i V-/I M loiupi Icl 






4 


MiinKoc Moripv/ 
nuyjico, i>iain,^y 


Y 
yv 


1 Y 

: A 


4 


Jurma Jpr 


X 


!x 

' #x 


4 


ixdllt:^ fxiuildiu Ivl Jl 


Y 


! Y 

A 


4 


Kpptpr Tprri 


X 


X 


4 


Kinnpv .larnMPlinp ^.l^rkip^ 

iNiiiii&y ^^ci^vjLj^iiii^ loaoixi^f 


X 


X 

#v 


4 


Kr^ift Rirh^rH 

ixiaiL, 1 ICll u 


X 

#x 


X 


4 


Krinnpnrinrf FdwarH W Sr 


X 


x 


4 


1 pnpr Jp^innp 




ix 

; yv 


4 


Lord Garv 


X 


^x 

1 


4 


1 nrd Nanrv 


X 


ix 

, A 


4 


hAnC^]i inn N/liphaol 


Y 
yv 


: A 


4 


MpPnpnpv Inhn T 

IVIL/^l lal icy f OUIIIl 1 


X 


Iy 

! A 


4 


lvl0INc;l nt;y , oyilLIUd 


Y 


Y 

i A 


4 


N^pn in nr\ r^hricfino 

. IVIC?I 111 II Iw, V-/IIIIOllMw 


Y 


Y 

1 A 


4 


Mo\/nlhan Inhn 
ivicyi III idi 1, viuiii 1 


Y 
yv 




4 


O'Rripn 1 aiirfp 
w LJi ic;i 1, L.CIUI ic 


Y 

-yv 


i Y 

1 A 


4 


paefpr 1 ind;^ 1 

1 OOl^l ) l_ll I^O ^ 


X 
y\ 


^Y 

I A 


4 


Phelan John V IV 


X 


;X 

! yv 


4 


Phelan John V III 


ix 


: yv 


4 


Pnwpll Amv 

1 w w wii 1 t\i 1 1 y 


^x 


ix 

■A 


4 


Rocjnan lohn 
rvcdydn, OUIIII 


Y 
yv 




4 


Roclor 1— lonr\/ 
rNColcl , nciiiy 


A 


i Y 

:A 


4 


^^irpfinl-Fnlpv Phv/lli^ 
wcii ciiitii [ \ji^y iiiyiiio 


X 


'Y 

1 A 


4 


\ji jcii jai ICll 1, r ciu 1010 


X 


Y 

'A 


4 


Qhpph^^n Mpil 
01 ICll 1 INCH 




Y 

: A 


4 


Snmpr Mrirn;^rpt 


X 


Y 

A 


4 


wiui 10, iviyiwii 


X 

■ A 




4 


Vauchpr Cathprinp M 

V vj w 1 J mi 1 ^ (III w IVI 


X 

#x 


ix 

■ yv 


4 


Walsh Karvn LK 


X 

/X 


X 

-yv 


4 


Watson Brian T 


X 


X 


4 


Withrow, Marysusan Buckley 


X 


X 


4 


Wynne, Katie 


X 


X 



2009 ATM/STM Attendance 



179 



2009 Town Meeting 



Pre 


Name 


May 4, 2009 




5 


Akim, Marta 






5 


Belhumeur, Cynthia Hatch 


X 


X 


5 


Belhumeur, R. Thomas 


X 


X 


5 


Bernstein, Neil 


X 


X 


5 


Callahan, Michael 






5 


Caplan, Edward 


X 


X 


5 


Carangelo, Lisa 


X 


X 


5 


Garden, John 


X 


X 


5 


Carr, Heather 






5 


Cerra Anthony J 


X 


X 


5 


Chapman, Randy 


.X 




5 


Devlin, Michael K 


x 


X 


5 


Epstein, Jay 


X 


X 


5 


Fletcher, Mary Ellen 


X 


X 


5 


Forman Amy 


X 




5 


'Forman, Adam 


X 




5 


Graham, David 






5 


Grant, Kenneth 


X 


X 


5 


Hartmann, Jill 




X 


5 


Hennessey, William F 


X 


X 


5 


Hodgkin, Doreen L 


ix 




5 


Hyman, Merle 


X 


X 


5 


Ippolito, Angela 




X 


5 


Jaffe, Sharon Tripolsky 


X 


X 


5 


Karwowski, John R 


iX 




5 


Keller, Ellen Long 


iX 




5 


! Lawler, Jack 


x 


X 


5 


!Lawler, Sami 


X 


X 


5 


'Lipson Philip 


X 




5 


' Mazow Robert E 


X 


X 


5 


Nellis, Veeder C 




X 


5 


; O'Neill, Thomas 






5 


Patkin, Marjorie 


X 


X 


5 


Patkin, Randall 


;X 




5 


; Pye, Darlene 


!X 


X 


5 


Rogers, Roberta C 


;x 


X 


5 


i Rooks George 


X 


X 


5 


; Rooks, Ruth 


;X 


X 


5 


IRossman Neil 


ix 




5 


Rubin, Gayle 


iX 


X 


5 


! Shore Geraldine 






5 


ISneirson, Gerald 




X 


5 


;Steinman, Roy H 






5 


!Sullivan, Jill 


X 


X 


5 


iTalkov, Roger 


x 


X 


5 


Van Dam David S 


X 


X 


5 


Vanderburg, Joanne 


X 


X 


5 


Vanderburg, Linso 


X 


X 


5 


Vatcher, Howard 






5 


Weiner, Lawrence J 


■ 




5 


Wollerscheid, William L 


X 


X 


5 


Zarinsky, Irma W Dr 


X 


X 


5 


Zeller, David E 


X 


X 


5 


Zeller, Virginia 


X 


X 



2009 ATM/STM Attendance 



180 



^uuy 1 own Meeiing 




Mamp 




Mav 4 2009 Mav 6 2009 


R 
D 


Rakpr Rnhprt A 




X 

y\ 


R 
u 


Rp^^iinrp 1 miripr 


X 


X 


R 
u 


Rpprmann lark M 


X 


:X 


ft 


Rplkin fivlvifl R 


X 


X 


6 


Block Lawrence S 






ft 

D 


DIU^iV, II Id LCC 






ft 
u 


Ri irnpcc QtiP 
Dui y coo, ouc 


X 




ft 
u 




X 


X 

yv 


ft 
u 


r^rnnfn Mir*h^iPl 


X 


:X 
1 yv 


ft 


Dpmhnw^ki f^lflirp 


X 




w 


;np\/pfli<^ Hanipf D 


X 


X 

•■ yv 




nri^rnll Thnm;^^ H .Ir F^n 






ft 

u 


UOCiO, II lO 


X 


X 

yv 


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Frlir*h Wnrrn^n 

Lli 1 IMUI 1 1 lOI 1 


X 


X 

yv 


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f L/j Id , r\d 1 1 Li 


X 

yv 




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Fri^ph Ppfpr 


X 


X 

• yv 


ft 

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(^nlH Annp W 

NJUIU, /^JillC VV 


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6 


Goldman Jsff 


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(nnldmfln Martin H 


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ix 

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'Gunta Marv KpIIv 


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X 

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Kanp Silvan 


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X 

yv 


6 


L p^^mon Jonathan 


X 

yv 


X 

yv 


6 


1 pv/pn^nn P^ii il F Fqh 


X 


ix 


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Pitman Martha 

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' Po^tpr Fiifipnp 1 


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6 


Rotnpr Kim 


yv 


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Rotner Philio 

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X 


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Rvan Danipl 


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Rvan Marv Ann 


X 

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Rvan William 

1 \ y v*< I'l »"iii I Vii4 III 


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:X 


6 


Sackett Shpllpv A 


X 

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ix 

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6 


■Qpllnrpan Fdward 

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Shutzer Carole B 


x 

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Whitman Andrpw S 




ix 

lyv 


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Witt, Sherri L. 


x 


ix 


6 


Yaeger, Dan 


X 


Ix 


6 


Yaeger, Lisa L 


X 


Ix 



2009 ATM/STM Attendance 



TOWN COLLECTOR and COLLECTOR OF TAXES 




Demise M. Dembkoski 






IN ACCOUNT WITH Trie TOWN Or SWAMroCOT 


r- 07/01/08 TO 06/30/09 


COLLECTIONS: 






Real Estate Taxes 


$ 


37,734,882.53 


Personal Property Taxes 


$ 


810,417.81 


Tax Title/Deferred Tax Collections 


$ 


10,940.56 


Automobile Excise Taxes 


$ 


1,869,909.42 


Water/Sewer Collections 


$ 


4,953,684.57 


Harbor Mooring Fees 


$ 


17.539.49 


Boat Excise Taxes 


$ 


7,248.99 


Note: 






Interest/charges/demand fees are included in above figures 






Rentals (Fish House, C&L, Yacht Club) 


$ 


35,585.15 


P.I.L.O.T. Payments 


$ 


8,075.00 


Non-Contributory Reimbursements 


$ 


22,887.52 


Cell Tower Leases 


$ 


95,412.71 


Fees for preparing Certificates of Municipal Lien 


$ 


14,425.00 


Total Collected - July 1, 2008 to June 30, 2009 


$ 


45,581,008.75 



182 



SWAMPSCOTT CONSERVATION COMMISSION 
JULY 10, 2008 

A discussion of evidence of an outfall, which is causing local erosion, from 53 Puritan 
Road, was held. 

A continued public hearing was held for a Notice of Intent (NOI) to demolish an existing 
house and construct a new single-family house and tennis court at 60 Tupelo Road, represented 
by Martin Goldman. Mr. Shutzer, representing neighbors, raised issue with notification of 
abutters. 

A public hearing was held for an NOI to replace storm water outfall within 100 feet of 
Palmer Pond's buffer zone and 100 feet within Phillips Beach's buffer zone. 
JULY 24, 2008 

An Enforcement Order was issued for 53 Puritan Rd, owned by Sherman Rogan. 

A continued public hearing was held for an NOI to replace storm water outfall within 100 
feet of Palmer Pond's buffer zone and 100 feet within Phillips Beach's buffer zone. 

A Certificate of Compliance was issued for 55 Puritan Lane. 
AUGUST 28, 2008 

A discussion was held regarding aluminum seawall stairs at 35 Lincoln House Point, and 
found that owner Bruse Paradise should file an NOI. 

A discussion found that Bruce Paradise should submit a Request for Determinafion or 
NOI for seawall repair on 13 Rockyledge Road. 
SEPTEMBER 11, 2008 

An Order of Conditions was issued for Phillips Beach outfall. 

A discussion was held regarding flooding problems on 61 and 65 Lincoln House Point 
Jill Sullivan, the owner of 43 Lincoln House Point, was informed that a retroactive NOI 

was needed for seawall repair on the property. 

OCTOBER 23, 2008 

A Certificate of Compliance was issued for seawall repair on Preston Beach 
Condominiums. 

A Certificate of Compliance was issued for the construction of a swimming pool on 2 
Lincoln House Point. 

A Certificate of Compliance was issued for landscaping on 1 1 Puritan Road. 

A discussion was held regarding seawall repair on 51 Lincoln House Point, and found 
that an NOI was required for work. 

A discussion regarding flooding problems at 61 and 65 Lincoln House Point was 
continued. Owners were advised to propose a method to mitigate flooding. 

A public hearing was held for an NOI filed by Aggregate Industries for improvements to 
existing quarry water holding lagoon discharge to Foster Pond. 

A discussion was held regarding Foster Pond plant overgrowth. The Commission 
planned to discuss this issue with the town engineer. 
NOVEMBER 20, 2008 

A discussion regarding flooding problems at 61 and 65 Lincoln House Point was 
continued. 

A continued public hearing was held, regarding an NOI filed by Aggregate Industries for 
improvements to existing quarry water holding lagoon discharge to Foster Pond. 
DECEMBER 18, 2008 

A discussion regarding flooding problems at 61 and 65 Lincoln House Point was 
continued. The Commission agreed that no decision would be reached unfil the end of February, 
due to the owner's absence. 

A continued public hearing was held, regarding an NOI filed by Aggregate Industries for 
improvements to existing quarry water holding lagoon discharge to Foster Pond. 
MAY 28, 2009 

A public hearing was held for an NOI filed by Preston Beach Owners Association Trust 
(PBOAT) to add riprap to an existing seawall. 
JUNE 1,2009 

Swampscott High School students Paulina Perlin and Adam Shiloh were unanimously 
accepted as one-year interns for the Conservation Commission. 



183 



Swampscott Contributory Retirement System 
July 1, 2008 to June 30, 2009 

Francis E. Delano, Jr., Elected, Chairman 
David Castellarin, Ex-Officio John F. Behen Jr. Elected 
John T. Kiely, Jr., Appointed Thomas H. Driscoll, Jr., Esq., Appointed 
Jeanne Darcy, Retirement Administrator 

Established in 1937, the Swampscott Contributory Retirement System is 
administered by a five-member Retirement Board and one full-time staff employee and 
one part-time employee. The Board is governed by Chapter 32 of the Massachusetts 
General Laws and by the Public Employee Retirement Administration Commission, a 
state agency that provides guidance and oversight for 106 Massachusetts Retirement 
Boards. Membership in the plan is mandatory immediately upon commencement of 
employment for all permanent employees. The plan is a contributory defined benefit 
plan covering all Town employees deemed eligible by the Retirement Board, with the 
exception of schoolteachers, who contribute to the Massachusetts Teachers' Retirement 
Board. 

The System provides for retirement allowance benefits up to a maximum of 80% 
of a member's highest three-year average annual rate of regular compensation. Benefit 
payments are based upon a member's age, length of creditable service, salary and 
group classification. Members become vested after ten years of service. For certain 
hazardous duty and public safety positions, maximum retirement is at age 65. A 
retirement allowance consists of an annuity, which represents members' accumulated 
total deductions including interest and a pension portion, which is funded by the Town. 
The average retirement benefit is 80-85% pension 15-20% annuity. Active members 
contribute either 5,7,8 or 9% of their gross regular compensation to the Retirement 
System, determined by the date upon which the employee enters the service of the 
town. Any member hired after January 1, 1979 contributes an additional 2% on wages 
over $ 30,000.00. 

As mandated by law, the Retirement Board has a fiduciary responsibility to the 
members and retirees of the system and to properly invest the fund's assets, totaling 
$31. 2M. In order to properly invest the system's assets, the Retirement Board engages 
the service of an investment consultant, Fiduciary Investment Advisors and ten 
investment managers: Chase Investment Counsel (large cap equities), and Wells Capital 
Management (fixed income securities), Eaton Vance Management (large cap equities), 
GE Investments (Commingled Pool), Artio International Equity (Comingled Funds, 
Atlantic Capital (SMid Cap Fund) and two real estate managers, Intercontinental Real 
Estate Corporation and American Realty Advisors., Piper Jaffray ( private equity 
manager). The Board also has an actuarial valuation performed every other year, the 
most recent being as of January 1 , 2008. According to the January 1 , 2008 valuation, 
the Retirement System is 51 .56% funded vs. 52.50% as of January 1 , 2006. The 
Unfunded Actuarial Accrued Liability is $31. 8M. The System will be fully funded by the 
year 2028. During the period July 1 , 2008-June 30, 2009, there were no changes in the 
makeup of the Board Members. For the year 2008, the Contributory Retirement System 
earned -23.19% of a total return on investment. During the period July 1, 2008-June 30, 
2009 a total of two Members retired. In addition, during this period, the Retirement 
System mourned the passing of six of our Retirees, or their surviving spouses. 

Respectfully submitted, Francis E. Delano, Jr., Chairman 



184 



Earth Removal Advisory Committee (ERAC) 
April 1,2010 

Change has come for the local quarry. After years and years, change is here; in part due 
to the economy and in part due to the firm and consistent demands from the ERAC and 
Board of Selectmen. 

Highlights in the current permit: the ERAC and Board of Selectmen eliminated summer 
work hours for the rock crusher after 5:30 to give local neighbors quiet evenings and 
weekends. After years of demands, Aggregate returned Essex Street to a quite residential 
roadway by banning all truck traffic from that very busy road. As of today (April 1, 
2010), the quarry is closed and not operating. All mobile equipment has been removed 
from the quarry and with the current economic climate, it is unknown if the operation will 
open this year. 

Please read the following narrative to gain a perspective of the history of this permit and 
plan that was put in place. 

At the end of the quarry modernization process which took years to complete, the ERAC 
and Town of Swampscott have been left with results that are unsatisfactory: The noise 
that was promised to go away with modernization is still there and problematic, and there 
is no quick fix. 

In no uncertain terms, and done in writing and reported in every annual report, the 
mandate was: bring the noise levels down, and modernize your equipment. Be sure to 
size your equipment to have the ability to meet your production requirements during a 
normal first shift operation, as the residents will not longer want to listen to rock crushers 
running at night. The Town of Swampscott has waiting since 1993 for this to happen. 
Unfortunately, it has not happened. 

While sound studies taken year after year have the quarry operation in and out of 
compliance with EPA standards, noise continues to be spread thru the neighborhoods 
both early in the morning, and late at night. 

At the permitting stage in June of 2008, the ERAC and Aggregate had agreed to reduce 
the summer night crushing hours to give the residents some relief during the summer. At 
the eleventh hour, within 20 minutes of the Public Hearing for the new permit. Aggregate 
Industries appeared with yet another new sound engineer, that told both the ERAC and 
Selectmen, that all the testing done over the years was done wrong, and that he had the 
right way to conduct the studies. 

Citing potential job loss at the quarry, the selectmen and ERAC, although skeptical of 
this "new method," gave AI a reprieve to allow the new test to happen. At the same time, 
the expert for the ERAC wrote and contacted, the Massachusetts Department of 
Environmental Protection Agency (DEP) for guidance and to be sure the town was using 



185 



the proper guidelines. More tests were conducted with this new engineer, and the results 
were unacceptable and did not change much from the test done in the spring; in fact, the 
testing may have been worse. Further, the DEP, issued written guidelines for noise 
studies that were in line with what the ERAC expert had been requiring over the past 
several years. 



When Aggregate Industries completely replaced and rebuilt the crushing plants, over a 
period of ten years, AI made a corporate decision not to increase the output of the facility 
to meet production needs, and AI made a corporate decision to leave many sound 
protection features off of the new manufacturing plant, despite the repeated requirement 
that was discussed verbally and put in writing every year and reported in the annual 
report {a copy of which is found here) AI cannot solve the problem now without 
reinvesting millions of dollars in the plant; which will also take years to complete. ' 
There are many methods in which Aggregate Industries can meet production needs 
without disturbing the residents in the night time; AI will need to plan for this as the 
summer of 2009 approaches. 

In 1993, former owner of the quarry Bardon Trimount, clear-cut a three-acre parcel of 
trees just north of Overhill road. Many neighbors felt increases in dust and noise. The 
Selectmen appointed a group and an Earth Removal by-law was voted in by town 
meeting in 1994. 

One of the first tasks of the newly formed "ERAC" was to place remaining undisturbed 
trees and property into a no-cut, no-disturb GREENBELT area for the protection of the 
neighbors. In addition, Bardon Trimount was forced to replant and replicate the three- 
acre site that was cut down without permits. 

The ERAC feels that the negative effect's of dust and noise the neighbors experienced 
and felt when the three acre parcel was clear-cut, is more than enough evidence to insist 
that the GREENBELT Buffer remain in place. The GREENBELT area is an important 
area to the residents and now the new Swampscott High School. The ERAC is working 
to ensure this area remain a solid buffer and is working at replanting some areas that have 
been encroached upon over the past few years. 

The ERAC continues to insist upon quarry modernization at the Aggregate Industry 
Operation on Danvers Road. 

The ERAC monitors the testing of water at Fosters Dam, and has continued to work on 
new noise studies that are comparing the new crushing plants to the old outdated 



186 



equipment that has been replaced. ERAC continues to build a date file in regards to the 
health and environmental issues surrounding the quarry operation. 

The ERAC monitors the daily operation of the quarry in regards to all activities in the 
quarry. The ERAC generally handles all complaints and inquiries at the Aggregate 
property. 



With the new high school up and running, Aggregate Industries put in place in mitigation 
efforts to reduce/eliminate Essex street truck traffic by having trucks hauling to Boston 
take a left out of the plant. This move has dramatically restored the quality of life to the 
residents along Essex street. 

The ERAC has been working and pushing AI to update and modernize the plant and 
equipment at the quarry since inception of the by-law in 1994. Using a strong, but fair 
guiding hand over the past few years, we can report that the quarry operation has been 
perhaps 99% modernized. The ERAC has negotiated fairly, but firmly. Many meetings 
have been confrontational with neither side wanting to back down. This seems to be a 
common occurrence in other local communities that have quarries located in them. 

Recognizing the size of the operation and understanding the complexity of replacing and 
modernizing a plant of such physical spanning size, the ERAC has worked with AI in 
directing, and sometimes selecting what was going to be done and in what order. For 
instance; the old secondary crusher was located right in the driveway of the old entrance. 
Crushing, screening, and loading of trucks were taking place just 200 feet from the 
entrance of the facility. Despite witnessing some valiant efforts by AI, both physically 
and financially to rein in the dust problem at this major section of plant, AI was unable 
bring dust containment down to an acceptable level. In order for the ERAC to 
recommend renewal of their permit AI had to relocate and upgrade this operation to an 
area of the quarry which was fijrther back firom the road, and into the upper part of the 
"hole." This plant has historically operated from the hours of 6:00 AM to 10:00 PM. 
The ERAC; in no uncertain terms has continuously informed AI that the plant and 
equipment should be sized properly to meet all their production needs within a 10-12 
hour work day. The ERAC has continuously clearly informed AI that after 2004, 
rock crushing past 5:00 or 6:00 PM in the evening was not realistic; and that the 
town and residents will not want to hear this equipment at that time of the evening 
and to be absolutely sure that their equipment and plant are sized to get the job 
done during typical construction hours. The ERAC continues to investigate some 
outstanding engineering questions in regards to the secondary plant but is very 
encouraged by the plants operation. The noise level produce by this plant is the 
measurement in which the ERAC shall measure against the new Primary Plant in 2004. 



1 



187 



** The ERAC has stated that should AI be able to conduct operations that would be 
oblivious to the neighbors and residents of Swampscott and Salem, that we would not 
mind a 24 hour operation. "If we can't hear you, we will not know you're there." 



Another key decision by the ERAC was the relocation of the front entrance. In an effort 
to cut down on dust blowing off trucks and to try and achieve a 50/50 split with truck 
traffic traveling through Salem & Swampscott, the ERAC "suggested" that the entrance 
be relocated. The ERAC believed that by moving the entrance further down the road, a 
majority of dust would blow off the trucks before reaching the populated areas of 
Swampscott and Salem. Although the traffic goal of 50/50 has not been realized, and 
dust blowing off trucks has been substantially reduced, dust still blowing off trucks 
remains a problem. When the push was made to relocate the entrance, the truck wash 
station that was to be installed during the summer of 2001 was delayed in part to properly 
place the equipment within the area of the new entrance; an entrance that involved a 
substantial effort to build. A truck wash station is not a mobile piece of equipment. It 
made no sense to install this equipment at the old entrance when a new exit was being 
constructed. The ERAC has been working of some type of truck wash since 1998, but 
has prioritized our improvement requests as we see fit. 

And finally the last piece of the puzzle: The primary crusher moves to the bottom 
by 2004. 

The ERAC has reached the end of a ten year effort to modernize the operation of the 
quarry. The primary crusher moving to the bottom of the hole is the final piece of the 
puzzle. But first some background on the current primary crusher: The primary crusher 
is the machine that most of the town is hearing. It is a machine that has two gigantic 
adjustable "jaws." It is also the first piece of equipment that the blasted rock is 
introduced to. Ledge rock is blasted from the face of the quarry, and hauled via huge 
trucks to the "hopper" of the primary plant. The trucks dump directly into the hopper and 
the rock falls into the "jaw" of the crusher. The jaw is set to a dimension to reduce the 
large raw blasted boulders into smaller rocks that are then screened and conveyed onto 
the secondary crushing plant. The primary plant is only one crusher . The secondary 
plant has many smaller crushers and screens that reduce and process the finished rock 
product. An interesting observation of the "jaw" crusher is that is makes less noise and 
runs faster if the raw material being dumped in the hopper is not all large stones. 
Interesting because the blasting technique has a lot to do with the size of the raw material 
that is dumped into the hopper. A lesser and maybe weaker "blast" seems to produce 
much larger raw material. This larger raw material dumped into the hopper of the "jaw" 



188 



make the "jaw" work that much harder, and is that much louder. Improved blasting 
techniques, as well as a new blasting contractor seem to have reduced the amount or 
larger rocks that go through the crusher as well as the blasting readings and complaints 
have diminished substantially over the past 6 years. 



The ERAC has worked to place the primary crusher in bottom of the hole for several 
reasons: 

1. Noise. The hope is that noise will be reduced to the level of the secondary 
crushing plant. This is the standard that we have talked about for the past several years. 
In 1997, before the secondary plant was replaced, the ERAC, in conjunction with former 
superintendent Marty McKenney, and Bardon Trimount noise engineer Mike Nutting, 
conducted several tests at various locations. We stood at the comer of Nichols and 
Martin road, the top of Overhill road, and at the intersection of Eastman and Minerva. 
With no measuring equipment set up, we conducted the following simple test: first we 
listened as the entire plant operated at full capacity. Marty then radioed the plant and had 
the secondary plant shut down. We noticed no change in the amount of noise. Next 
Marty radioed to run the secondary plant again, and this time shut down the primary 
plant, the "jaw." There was virtually no noise with the secondary plant running and 
the primary plant off. We perfonned this test at the other locations and heard the same 
results. This is to be the test for the new primary plant . In order to maintain the 
existing historical hours of operation, Bardon Trimount would have to reach the noise 
level of that when the secondary crusher is running by itsel f. No measure of decibel's; a 
simple test of the naked ear . It is Dan Dandreo's contention that the new plant will not 
be able to be achieved these noise levels even with the new primary crushing plant in 
place, which is why new capacity is so important. 

2. Capacity. The ERAC, concerned that noise reduction goals cannot be met, 
has continuously insisted that the new primary crusher is sized properly to ensure 
needed and contract production can be met within a 10-12 hour workday. This 
plant has historically operated from the hours of 7:00 AM to 9:00 PM. The ERAC; 
in no uncertain terms has continuously informed AI that the plant and equipment 
should be sized properly to meet all their production needs within a 10-12 hour 
work day. The ERAC has clearly informed AI that after 2004, rock crushing past 
5:00 or 6:00 PM in the evening was not realistic; and that the town and residents 
will not want to hear this equipment at that time of the evening and to be absolutely 
sure that their equipment and plant are sized to get the job done during typical 
construction hours. 



189 



3. Dust. The ERAC is optimistic that by placing the Primary Crusher deeper into 
the hole will reduce the dust from escaping the rim of the quarry because the dust will 
have to travel much further to leave the property. In addition, there appears to be several 
"foaming" products that are available that may be able to be adapted to the plant 
equipment to further reduce dust before it becomes airborne. 



Closing thought. Moving the primary crusher to the bottom of the hole by no means 
guarantees that all will be well at the end of 2004. By the end of 2004-2005, It appears 
that the quarry operation will be fully modernized. The Town of Swampscott, the City of 
Salem, and the quarry may be at a crossroad. Should the quarry, after ten years of intense 
modernization, not be able to reduce noise, dust and truck traffic to level's which allow it 
to co-exist with its neighbors, and not be able to reach and follow requirements out lined 
under the bylaws of the Town of Swampscott, the realization that a quarry of such 
magnitude just cannot fit in such a tight populated area may have to be made. Perhaps a 
new use of the land along the lines of the now closed Rowe quarry in Revere, or the Innis 
quarry in Danvers may indeed be the most appropriate use of the property. 



190 



EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT 

Kevin Breen, Director 
Chief Ronald Madigan, Deputy Director 
Act. Chief Michael Champion, Deputy Director 



The Town of Swampscott Emergency Management Agency provides the liaison to state and 
federal emergency management resources in times of disaster natural or man-made. The agency 
monitors initiatives from state and federal agencies and applies for appropriate grants for mitigation of 
local disasters as well as securing appropriate training for local officials to respond in times of need. 

This past year we worked to form an emergency management team of Town officials from various 
departments who would play a role in mitigating the effects of emergencies in Swampscott. In addition to 
our Police and Fire Chiefs, this team includes the director of the Health Department, the head nurse from 
the School Department, the DPW director as well as representatives from the Town's financial 
departments of accounting and treasurer. These key individuals have been a tremendous asset to our 
on-going emergency planning activities. 

The Swampscott Emergency Management team working in concert with the Health Department 
monitored the Town's response to the H1N1 flu outbreak which took place this past fall and winter. The 
Town was fortunate that the outbreak was not as severe as had been feared, but contingency plans were 
developed which could be implemented if there is a recun-ence next season. Emergency Management is 
working with FEMA and Massachusetts Emergency Management to facilitate federal assistance which is 
available to those residents and businesses affected by the unprecedented rain storms of this past 
March. We also will be working with the DPW director to recover funds expended on flood control efforts 
expended by the town. 

Plans for this year include outfitting a 16' utility trailer to store all of our emergency shelter 
supplies such as cots and blankets, as well as housing a mini command post with cross-band radio 
repeaters to provide interoperable radio communications. This purchase was made possible by a grant 
from the Northeast Homeland Regional Security Advisory Council (NERAC). Also through a Metropolitan 
Area Planning Council (MAPC) grant we are conducting a full up-date of our Comprehensive Emergency 
Management Plan (CEMP). 

I would like to remind all residents that Emergency Preparedness is everyone job. Residents 
should always be prepared with non perishable food, water, flashlights, battery operated radios, warm 
clothing and blankets. While we don't live in an area of the country prone to the types of disasters we see 
on the news every day, i.e. tornadoes, earthquakes, etc. we remain prone to blizzards, hurricanes and 
believe it or not earthquakes, so individual vigilance remains our collective best defense. 

I would like to thank my co-partners in this preparedness effort. Town Administrator Andrew 
Maylor, Police Chief Ronald Madigan, Fire Chief Michael Champion, for their ongoing support 



191 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 

The mission of the Swampscott Fire Department is to provide optimum protection from fire loss, and to 
provide prompt and professional response to all medical emergencies. Although our primary objective is 
always to prevent loss of life and property through a proactive approach to fire prevention, when fire does 
occur, to contain and extinguish it with minimum loss. 

The Fire Department is made up of three divisions. The first division is the Administrative 
division, which is the Fire Chief, Training and Operations Officer (TOPS), and the Fire Investigation Unit 
(FIU). The Tops Officer is in charge of training, operations, and planning. He also keeps records of all the 
training that is done by the fire personnel, as well as records of all the equipment that is used by the 
department. This position is vital, because it keeps continuity between the four shifts that are working and 
coordinates with numerous professionals needed to keep the training current and up to date. The FIU unit is 
made up of one Lieutenant and one fire fighter, who are normally assigned to the suppression duty but have 
been trained in fire investigation and do so in addition to their other duties. 

The second division is the Fire Prevention division, which is run by Deputy Breen. This division 
has been extremely busy, enforcing the new sprinkler laws that have come down from the State Fire 
Marshals office and working with the Building Inspector on changes to the new building code. This office 
is also in charge of all the fire related permits that are needed to do business in town. There continues to be 
a significant amount of conversions of oil to gas heat because of the energy crisis. 

The third division is the fire Suppression/EMS division and this is made up subdivisions. 
There are four sub-divisions. With this configuration we are currently running with one Engine 
Company and one Ladder Company per shift. Each group works a 24-hour shift giving, the 
residents of Swampscott 24/7 Emergency Medical and Fire Protection. 

During the fiscal year July 1 , 2008 to June 30, 2009 the fire department answered one thousand 
seven hundred seventy five emergency calls, of which 37 involved fires in buildings. The Department also 
responded to one thousand one hundred sixteen Non-Emergency Incident calls during the year. These calls 
dealt with fire inspections, school fire drills, box plug outs and any other non-emergency calls that the Fire 
Department might be required to respond to during the year. 

PERSONNEL 

During the past year, the Fire Department had only one member, Chief Richard Carmody, retire 
after 32 years of service and one member Firefighter Jennifer Bleiker resigned for personal reasons. The 
Town currently has a reserve list. This reserve list allows the Town to hire, without delay, a permanent or 
provisional firefighter for a position that may come available in the coming months, due to injury or 
retirement. The current appointee to the reserve list is Patrick Gallo. He has successfully completed the 
hiring process and was appointed to the reserve list in November 2006. 

TRAINING, OPERATIONS, PLANNING AND SAFETY (TOPS) 

The Swampscott Fire Department has continued to provide its members with daily training. There 
has been a number of co-training courses that have been taught with the surrounding Fire Departments. 
This winter the Swampscott and Lynn Fire Departments trained in pond ice rescue, using Lynn's state of 
the art water rescue equipment. The training course was then relocated to the ocean at Lynn's Red rock area 
and again used the ice rescue equipment to simulate rescuing people off the ocean rocks. 

Marblehead and Swampscott Fire Departments, as well as some Salem Firefighters trained at the 
General Glover property in propane emergences taught by the Hoiden Propane Company. This course was 
very beneficial to all the Departments due to the number of propane trucks that are constantly in the area. 

Each year the Fire Department trains in medical emergency. Ninety seven percent of the 
Department will be recertified by the state as EMT's. This is a two-year process that requires each EMT to 
complete courses and accumulate 28 CEUs (Continuing Education Units) credits plus a 24-hour refresher 
course and examination to comply with State regulations. This will include CPR and defib training as well. 
The Department also completed mandatory Hazardous material, as well as NIMS 300 training. NIMS' 
training is National Incident Management training. This training allows the fire department to work with 
Federal, State and local agencies in times of national disasters or any type of large scale emergencies that 
require multiple agency coordination. In service training on SOPs (Standard Operating Procedures) are 
constantly held during the regular shifts on a variety of subjects, including but not limited to, the apparatus 
operation and specialty equipment techniques. There is also training in the use of the Fire Department's 
rescue boat, as well as firefighting tactics and strategies. 



192 



From a planning, operation, and safety standpoint, the Department continues to make safety for 
our firefighters and citizens our number one priority. Standard Operating Procedures are our guidehnes for 
safety when using tools or operating at emergency incidents. These procedures are being reviewed for ways 
to improve on safety and efficiency throughout the year. These guidelines are also used to help maintain 
the consistency with the shifts in the daily operations of the Department. 

The Department S.A.F.E. Program (Student Awareness of Fire Education) is still run by Lt. 
Zimbaldi and Lt. Scranton. These program coordinators and instructors can be found in our Middle School, 
educating the young students in valuable information on fire safety. This program is State-run, and is 
totally funded from grant money that the instructors have applied for each year. Lt. Zimbaldi and Lt. 
Scranton have had great success with the elementary school age children. 

FIRE PREVENTION 

The Fire Department's Fire Prevention Office, under the direction of Deputy Breen, inspects all 
commercial establishments and residences of three or more families annually. In addition to this, all 
mandatory inspections and fire drills are conducted in accordance with Massachusetts State Law. 

The Fire Prevention office is working diligently to impute all the needed fire prevention materials 
and permits into computer form. This process has been ongoing for over a year and has reached 
completion. There are over thirty different types of permits, ranging from cooking fires on the beach to 
under ground storage tanks. Over 70% of these permits need follow-up inspections to be sure that the 
applicant has complied completely with the laws. These inspections as well as the mandatory building and 
school inspections, are done as non-emergency incidents, by the on shift crews. And they number in the 
thousands each year. 

APPARATUS AND EQUIPMENT 

The Town has three pieces of fire apparatus in their fleet; there are two fire engines and one tower 
ladder. The tower ladder was bought in 2004 and is in good shape, but the two engines have seen some 
hard service. The older of the two engines is a 1988 E-One Hush that has out-lived its service life and is 
declared surplus and designated for auction. The other engine is a 1997 E-One Cyclone. This engine had to 
have its transmission replaced as well as other major repairs. With the Town running only one engine most 
of the time the Department is finding that the 1997 is breaking done more frequently than expected and will 
require some refiirbishment to extend its life. With the help of the Capital Improvement Committee and the 
Board of Selectman, we have secured a contract to purchase a new Crimson Fire Engine from Hilton Head 
Fire Department. This should arrive late summer. 

BUILDINGS 

The two buildings maintained by the Fire Department, Headquarters on Burrill Street and Phillips 
Beach Avenue continue to show their age. The outside of the Burrill Street Station had been upgraded and 
should hold up well in the coming years, but the inside could use some reconditioning, floor tiles, and 
paint. As for the Phillips Beach Station, this building has been declared surplus and set up auction. Capital 
improvement committee has slated some upgrades in the Burrills Street station for the coming year that will 
be helpfiil. A new back up generator is scheduled to go out to bid. These improvements are on going at this 
time. 

CONCLUSION 

The current fiscal cHmate is taking its toll on the fire service. The Town now has four unfilled 
vacancies, which causes the Fire Department to run with only one engine and one ladder company per shift, 
three quarters of the time. Unfortunately for smaller communities like Swampscott, we do not have the 
large amount of pubhc safety resources to be able to cut staff in difficult times and still be able to provide 
the same services. 

The Fire Department has appreciated the Town's support over the last year, and vows to continue 
its dedication in providing the best possible service in the year to come. 

Respectfully Submitted, 
Michael Champion, Fire Chief 



193 



Harbor Advisory Committee 



William F. Hennessey-Chairman 



Lawrence P. Bithell 
Michael Gambale 
Peter McCarriston 



Paul DeBole 
Charles Borgioli 
Jackson Schultz 



The Harbor Advisory Committee met on three occasions during the 2009 boating season to 
discuss matters of interest and importance with regard to the Swampscott waterfront. 

We continue to discuss situations previously communicated in the form of recommendations 
to the town administration, some over a period of many years, that seem to be consistently 
ignored. We shall continue to press forward with suggestions and recommendations as that is 
our assignment. 

As an example, the Harbor Advisory Committee has for many years been bringing the town 
administration's attention the deplorable condition of the pier railings. We continue to do so with 
the earnest wish that our advice to remedy the chipping paint problem will be heeded. Very sharp 
paint shards continue to lift from the railing surface posing a serious threat to anyone running 
their hand along the railing. Failure to deal with the de-laminating paint will also leave the 
railings unprotected and will thus considerably shorten the life expectancy of the railings. Other 
situations including proper trash management in the area, pram rack maintenance/repair, 
pram/kayak storage on the beach,fire lanes in the Fish House parking lot, Fishouse drainage and 
odor remediation, and launch ramp renovation have been highlighted and called to the attention 
of the Town Administrator. 

The Harbor Advisory Committee feels strongly that town officials should protect the Fishouse 
property and its environs with special attention paid to traditional use going back to 1896 and 
beyond. Indeed, we feel that there is a responsibility on the part of the town to protect the interest 
of their own primary Fish House tenants, specifically the boaters, fishermen, and Swampscott 
residents who frequent Blaney Beach. The Harbor Advisory Committee shall maintain vigilance 
and will react as circumstances dictate. 

The Harbor Advisory Committee, as the name stipulates is an advisory group to the Board of 
Selectmen, to the Town Administrator, and to the community as a whole. Members are appointed 
for their expertise and special interest in waterfront related matters. As members, we appreciate 
the opportunity to be of service to the town; however, we fully realize that we are not the only 
source of good advice in matters pertaining to the waterfront. As such, we do sincerely solicit 
thoughts and ideas from any and all citizens with a view toward making the waterfront, a unique 
part of our town, an even better community resource. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Swampscott Harbor Advisory Committee 

William F. Hennessey 
Chairman 



194 



Harbormaster's Department 

Lawrence P. Bithell-Harbormaster 

Assistant Harbormasters 

Mounzer Aylouche 

Roger Bruley 
William Hennessey 

The 2009 boating season in Swampscott may be described as, in a word, dreary. Most folks 
worried about global warming. During the first two months of the boating season, we concerned 
ourselves with "global wetness". Weekend weather was most often cool and rainy throughout the 
late Spring, Summer, and early Fall. Weekend activity around the harbor was thus quite 
"dampened" by the nasty weather. Extremely high fuel prices may too have been a detriment to 
boat usage for even on days when weather was pleasant, folks often just sat on their boats at 
mooring rather than opting for a cruise. 

The number of vessels moored in Swampscott waters remained essentially the same as in the 
previous year. Diminished depth in the harbor due to shoaling and a general filling in of the 
mooring field since the last dredging project many years ago imposes limits on the number of 
vessels which may be safely moored here. In 2006, we found it necessary to establish a waiting 
list for vessels over twenty-five feet in length and vessels having deep keels. Again as in the past 
few years, we sought funding in the department budget request to remove "ghost" moorings to 
create openings for additional vessels; however, the request was not granted. We estimate that the 
funds sought to open mooring space would have been greatly exceeded by mooring fees and 
excise tax revenue; however, town administration did not agree. We shall try again in next year's 
budget request. 

There were no particularly destructive weather events this season; thus, no vessels sustained 
damage of any significance. 

As the principal public safety official upon Swampscott waters, your Harbormaster is responsible 
for enforcing federal, state, and local ordinances as they affect the waterfront. This encompasses 
many facets including: 

1 . With the assistance of the Town Clerk and the Town Treasurer, 
manages the mooring permit system. 

2. Establishes mooring equipment specifications tailored to specific 
vessels while at mooring. 

3. Inspects mooring equipment to assure compliance with specifications. 

4. Places mooring equipment in the harbor to assure proper spacing between 
boats while ascertaining that vessels are located where sufficient depth 
exists to accommodate draft and swing requirements. 

5. Patrols town waters with an eye toward boater and bather safety. 

6. Performs rescues at sea from time to time as necessary. 

7. Maintains town boat to assure suitability for its mission as an 
"emergency" vessel. 



195 



8. With the staff of Assistant Harbormasters, participates in ongoing 

training under the auspices of the Massachusetts Criminal Justice Training 
Council in conjunction with the North Shore Harbormasters Association. 

The purpose of the foregoing elements of your Harbormaster's function is to make certain that 
boating upon Swampscott waters remains a safe and wholesome recreational pursuit for all. 

2009 was the third full season for the new town boat. It performed as expected and should 
continue to do so for its estimated useful life of twenty-five years. Equipment on the boat 
including radar, a global positioning system, and a depth sounder provides the staff with that 
which is necessary to perform our mission. This boat will suit the current staff and the next 
generation harbormaster and assistant harbormasters. Considerable time and energy went into 
training on the new boat to include familiarization with its state-of-the-art equipment. 

Your Harbormaster and Assistant Harbormasters continue to be active in the North Shore 
Harbormasters Association. This organization is comprised of Harbormasters Departments from 
Winthrop to Salisbury and all coastal communities in between. Because of our involvement in 
this association, a Swampscott student is eligible to compete for a $ 1 ,000.00 college scholarship 
sponsored by the N.S.H.A. Mutual aid is also available when necessary. Indeed, a Swampscott 
student won the award this year. 

The time has come for the Harbormaster's Department to seek additional trained staff. 
Accordingly, we have recruited two highly qualified individuals for Assistant Harbormaster 
positions. The names of these individuals have been submitted to the Town Administrator and to 
the Selectmen for approval and appointment. This strengthening of staff will provide for greater 
coverage and efficiency. Since these individuals volunteer their time, there will be no additional 
cost to the town for their services. 

In order to assure success in accomplishing the mission of the Harbormaster's Department, 
cooperation of many individuals, organizations, boards, and committees is essential. We therefore 
extend our appreciation to Town Meeting, to the Capital Improvement and Finance Committees, 
to the Board of Selectmen, to the Police, Fire, and Public Works Departments, to Town Clerk and 
Treasurer and their staffs, To the Swampscott Yacht Club for the use of their launch service and 
for other considerations, thanks for your help as well. Very special appreciation is extended to the 
Assistant Harbormasters who devote so much time and effort on a voluntary basis. Finally, to the 
boaters whom we serve, thank you for your cooperation and good will, for it is you who 
ultimately make boating in Swampscott such a wholesome and pleasurable pastime. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Lawrence P. Bithell-Harbormaster 

William F. Hennessey-Assistant Harbormaster 



196 



ANNUAL REPORT BOARD OF HEALTH JULY 1, 2008 THROUGH JUNE 30, 2009 



Dr. Larry Block, Chairman of the Board of Health 
Nelson Kessler, Member, Board of Health 
Martha Dansdill, Member, Board of Health 

Jeffrey Vaughan, Director of Public Health 

Roseanne Morrissey Bruno, RN, EMI, Public Health Nurse 

The Board of Health continues to be committed to promoting health and well being for the 
residents of Swampscott. The Board of Health values the importance of educating residents in many 
areas of public health and safety. As well, the Health Department works with many other departments 
and communities to ensure a sound environment. 

TRASH & RECYCLING 

Trash and recycling continue to be a big part of the Board of Health's day-to-day operation. The 
Health Department deals with multiple phone calls, questions, requests and complaints many of which 
need to be investigated before they can be resolved. Our recycling contracts, as well as the rubbish 
contract, is with Hiltz Disposal. DeRosa Landfill Management is utilized for the paper recycling needs of 
the Schools and Municipal buildings. 

Recycling continues under the direction of the Chairman of Recycling Committee, Nelson 
Kessler. The Board urges all Swampscott residents to recycle more diligently as it is beneficial to the 
town, both ecologically and economically. 

Our contract with Hiltz Disposal has provisions for increased limits and bulk items. There was a 
drop-off area at the Department of Public Works yard on Paradise Road for the disposal of white goods 
(i.e.: washing machines, dryers, hot water heaters) and light clean iron only . We will NOT accept any 
refrigerators, freezers, air conditioners or microwave ovens. This is very important. Any materials that 
are not deemed recyclable will be returned to the Town of Swampscott and cost the taxpayers to dispose 
of it in an alternative way. Due to the abuse of our unsupervised site, it was deemed necessary to 
change our metal collection program. This new program furnishes a dumpster to be available for non- 
hazardous items on the last Saturday of each month during the months of March to November at the 
Department of Public Works yard. 

In the past year, the Board of Health sponsored two (2) Electronics drop-offs. We collected 
approximately two hundred twenty-three (223) televisions and computer monitors, as well as thirty-three 
(33) microwave ovens and various other electronic devices. 

We offered two (2) household hazardous waste day events. The events held in June and 
November were held in conjunction with the Marblehead Board of Health for both communities. 

There were six (6) curbside leaf pickups. Also, the residents wishing to dispose of yard waste 
could purchase a sticker through the Department of Public Works for fifty dollars ($50.00) and bring their 
leaves and grass clipping up to the Landscape Gardeners facility on Swampscott Road. The Town 
received more than twenty-three thousand dollars ($23,000.00) for the paper and cardboard collected 
curbside during the year. 

RESTAURANT INSPECTIONS 

Yearly inspections include approximately sixty-five (65) establishments in the Town of 
Swampscott. If a restaurant fails, Jeffrey Vaughan makes follow-up visits until that establishment is in 
compliance with the State Health and Sanitary codes. Yearly, the Health Department sends out permits 
to these establishments. 

BEACH TESTING 

Beach testing is performed weekly. We have six (6) beaches that are required to be tested 
throughout the summer. Heavy rains in late June forced the Health Department to post warning signs at 
Preston Beach. Signs were posted at the main entrance of the effected beach stating "No Swimming" 
until follow-up tests revealed acceptable results. The Board of Health recommends no swimming at town 
beaches within twenty-four hours of heavy rainstorms. Phillips Beach was remarkably clean in 2008. 



197 



EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS 

The Swampscott Health Department is a participant in the North Shore - Cape Ann Emergency 
Preparedness Coalition, a fifteen (15) community coalition that meets monthly to plan resources and 
responses to public health threats and emergencies. Such emergencies would include terrorism and 
outbreaks of infectious diseases. 

In April of 2008, the Health Department began working with schools to deal with the emerging 
H1N1 influenza virus. 

The coalition has developed a website to enhance the communities' collective capacity to share 
these resources and to create a database of medical and non-medical volunteers. 

The Board of Health encourages all residents to visit http://www.nscalert.orq to help better 
prepare themselves for emergency situations and to volunteer in emergencies. 

CLINICS 
INFLUENZA 

The Board of Health conducted three (3) public flu clinics this past year. These clinics were held 
at Congregation Shirat Hayem of the North Shore (2) and the Swampscott Senior Center (1). Roseanne 
Morrissey Bruno along with volunteer nurses and student nurses from Salem State College were able to 
immunize approximately nine hundred (900) residents. The flu clinics were very successful due to the 
many clerical and nurse volunteers that came forward to participate. We would like to thank Rabbi Levy 
for the use of the Congregation Shirat Hayem facilities. The Public Health Nurse billed all senior health 
plans for the administration costs and collected a total of four hundred seventy-seven dollars and thirty- 
four cents ($477.34) 

The Health Department thanked the volunteers of the flu clinics with a luncheon. We appreciate 
their support and commitment. 

The Health Department also supplied home visits for elderly inbound residents. 

BLOOD PRESSURE 

Roseanne Morrissey Bruno, RN, EMT performed twelve (12) scheduled blood pressure clinics at 
the Senior Center. The Health Department would like to thank volunteer, Mary Curtis, RN, for conducting 
afternoon blood pressure clinics on a continuous basis. 

HEPATITIS A 

The Board of Health continues to offer the Hepatitis A program to Swampscott food handlers. 
HEPATITIS B 

Hepatitis B vaccines continue for eligible town employees. Each new town worker for the 
Department of Public Works, Police Department, Fire Department and School Department may choose to 
be immunized against Hepatitis B. This is recommended especially for first responders who would be 
more at risk. Several employees were immunized in the past twelve months. 

PNEUMOCOCCAL 

The Swampscott Health Department offers Pneumococcal vaccine to all eligible residents in the 
town. Several vaccinations were given out this year. In addition, Pneumococcal vaccine was dispensed 
during the Influenza Clinics. 

IMMUNIZATIONS DISPENSEMENT 

All State supplied vaccines are now delivered directly to the Public Health Department. The 
public health nurse logs in the lot numbers and expiration dates and dispenses the medications as 
needed. 

COMMUNICABLE DISEASE 

Our Public Health Nurse tracked all communicable diseases in the town, watching closely for any 
clusters or outbreaks. The Public Health Nurse works closely with the Massachusetts Department of 
Public Health (MDPH), school nurses, and doctor's offices. 



198 



GRANT 



NORTHSHORE & CAPE ANN EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS COALITION 

The Northshore & Cape Ann Emergency Preparedness Coalition received a grant from the 
Center for Disease Control to respond to public health threats and emergencies such as bio-terrorism and 
outbreaks of infectious disease. 

The monies received by the North Shore and Cape Ann Emergency Preparedness Coalition must 
be earmarked for Health Department needs only. The money cannot be turned over to the general funds. 
The City of Gloucester is the host community and disperses funding to each community in accordance 
with population and need. 

CAMP INSPECTIONS 

In June of each year, the Director and Public Health Nurse inspected five (5) summer camps for the 
purpose of meeting the regulations developed by the Massachusetts Department of Public Health and 
local rules. This is another state required mandate that must be done for the safety of our children. This 
inspection included a thorough investigation of the campsite to insure that the environment was safe for 
the attending children. 

• Safe structures and equipment 

• Sanitary facilities 

• Adequate supervision of the campers at all times 

• Plans and protocols in place for medical emergencies, including medicine administration, 
natural and physical disasters 

• Sufficient health care coverage 

• Injury and fire prevention protocols 

• CORl and SORI checks for all employees 

• To ensure that there is a health supervisor on site over the age of eighteen (1 8) who knows first 
aid and CPR 

• Up to date immunization records for staff and campers 
INFORMATIONAL ARTICLES 

The Health Director and Public Health Nurse published several articles in the Swampscott Reporter, 
thanks to George Derringer for his assistance. 

• Sun Safety Tips 

• Influenza prevention and safety 

• Proper recycling 

In addition, the Swampscott Board of Health manages the Health information stand at the Town Hall with 
informational brochures. 

CONFERENCES ATTENDED 

The Health Department attended conferences or were educated in the following: 

• Yankee Environmental Health Conference 

• Immunization Updates 

• Medicare Billing 

• Smoke-free Apartments and Condominiums 

• Pandemic Influenza 

• Emergency Dispensing Sites 

• Starting a Sharps Kiosk 

• Environmental Protection Agency Lead Paint Education 

• Green Cleaning - Safe Alternatives 

• Green Restaurants 

• Trans Fat Regulations 

• Air Quality Nuisances 

• Emergency Preparedness 

• Monthly Public Health Nurse's Meeting in Tewksbury State Hospital 



199 



• Tuberculosis: A World Without Borders 

• Communicable Disease Surveillance 

• Importance of Immunizing Adolescents 

OTHER POINTS OF INTEREST 

The Health Department continues to collect button batteries, recyclable batteries and small fluorescent 
bulbs at our Town Hall office. 

VITAL STATISTICS 

The Town of Swampscott welcomed one hundred forty-eight (148) new residents with more 
males than females. There were eighty-three (83) males and sixty-five (65) females born. 
Congratulations to all! 

This year there were one hundred sixty-two (162) deaths in Swampscott. The leading cause of 
death was cardiac conditions followed by various cancer conditions and respiratory failure. 

In closing, we would like to thanl< all the dedicated staff and volunteers for making July 2008 through June 
2009 a very dynamic and triumphant time for the Board of Health. 



200 



SWAMPSCOTT HISTORICAL COMMISSION 
ANNUAL REPORT 



Members of the commission met with Mrs. Kostinden, Martin Goldman and Preservation Architect Franl< 
Shirley at 60 Tupelo Rd to discuss ways the present structure could be preserved rather than demolished. 
Mr. Shirley offered lots of suggestions for the owners to renovate the existing structure, keeping in mind their 
concerns for better use of the space. 

We requested that the Board of Selectmen appoint a Committee to look into the status of the Andrews 
Chapel, which is in disrepair. Angela Ippolito has spoken with the Massachusetts Historical Commission 
regarding National Register status for this building. She was told that the entire cemetery would need to be 
included. This would require a more detailed inventory than we currently have. By taking these steps it will 
make the Chapel eligible for preservation funding. We have also requested that the Town removed remove 
and store the Square Grand piano that is located in the Chapel for safe keeping. 

Angela Ippolito was contacted by the owners of BIystheswood. They wish to place, a "Conservation 
Easement" on the property along with historic restrictions on the house. She explored getting the house on 
the National Register through the Massachusetts Historic Commission. They prefer that the entire area, 
Little's Point, be included in order to do this fifty percent of the area residents must be in favor. 

The Swampscott Yacht Club came before the Commission with a request to extend a 12 foot deck off the 
back of the historic Fish House. After much discussion, by fishermen, neighbors and commission members 
the request was unanimously rejected. The original proposal was a much smaller version; this proposal was 
just too large and would have changed the historical character of the building. 

We continue to present our annual Preservation and Restoration Awards. We recognize those owners 
who have protected their homes. They have helped to preserve the historic character of the town. 

Dale Milne and Laurie DiCierico, whose father was Swampscott Selectman George Thomson, donated 
two paintings, one of Elihu Thomson and the other of his wife Mary Louise Peck to the Commission and 
Town. They have also donated numerous artifacts that the Commission plans to display in the near future. 

As always, the Commission would like to thank the members of the Board of Selectmen and Andrew 
Maylor for their continued support of our many endeavors. 



Respectfully submitted, 
Jean F. Reardon 
Chairperson 



201 



7/1/08-6/30/09 



SWAMPSCOTT HOUSING AUTHORITY 

James L. Hughes, Chairman 

Albert DiLisio Marianne McGrath 

Barbara Eldridge Richard Callahan 



Due to the continuing financial constraints placed on the Housing Authorities throughout the state 
by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and the Massachusetts Department of Housing and Community 
Development (DHCD), major modernization projects in public housing are still on hold except for major 
emergencies. The Swampscott Housing Authority has had to adjust its goals accordingly; therefore, 
during Fiscal Year 2008-2009, the prime focus of the Authority has been on quality of tenant life issues. 
Executive Director, Donna McDonald has continued to address issues of quality of life in our public 
housing communities. 

In 2008-2009 the Swampscott Housing Authority did not accept applications for two bedroom 
housing units at the family housing due to the length of the two bedroom waiting list. However, the 
Executive Director did recommend to the Board of Governors the opening of the waiting list for the three 
bedroom units in the family housing complex at the Margaret Kelly Family Housing Community. The three 
bedroom list was opened in September, 2008 for 10 days during which period 50 new applications were 
received. 

The Swampscott Housing Autinority continued its landlord/tenant relationship with Northeast ARC 
(Formerly known as North Shore Association of Retarded Citizens (North Shore ARC)) for the rental of 
the Housing Authority property at 12 Ryan Place, Swampscott. Northeast ARC manages and monitors 
the housing for its clients, 8 deaf, retarded citizens, at 12 Ryan Place. The Authority has leased 12 Ryan 
Place to Northeast ARC for approximately 20 years. During this year the Swampscott Fire Department 
performing routine checks of alarm system discovered that the Ryan Place fire alarm system was 
malfunctioning and notified the Authority of this problem. The option facing the Authority was a very 
expensive replacement of the complete system or a substantial repair bill. However, the now Deputy 
Chief of the Swampscott Fire Department, Kevin Breen, took it upon himself to contact the L.W. Bills 
Alarm Engineering Co. and ascertained the likelihood of a very reasonable cost, repair at the L.W. Bills 
shop. Deputy Chief Breen removed the malfunctioning components, brought them to the Georgetown, MA 
shop, and after the repair, returned the components to the box. As a result of Deputy Green's initiative, 
the severely disabled residents of 12 Ryan Place were fully protected days ahead of what could have 
been expected had Deputy Chief Breen not exercised such devotion to duty. The Swampscott Housing 
Authority would like to officially and publically thank the Swampscott Fire Department and specifically. 
Deputy Chief Kevin Breen for their invaluable assistance. 

The Authority initiated two important environmentally friendly projects during this reporting period. 
First, the Authority purchased 6 rain barrels which, during the non-winter months, are connected to 
rainwater downspouts on buildings at Duncan Terrace and Doherty Circle. The barrels collect and save 
run-off rain water and using the attached garden hose, provide water for the preservation of decorative 
flora and tenants' vegetable gardens at no cost to the Authority; Second: Preliminary planning was started 
for participation in the Massachusetts Department of Housing and Community Development (DHCD) Low 
Flow Toilet Procurement Project in which DHCD will fully fund the purchase and installation of 44 new low 
water toilets at Doherty Circle. 

The Authority installed two large flood lights at Duncan Terrace to improve the safety and security 
in the Duncan Terrace parking lot. 

The Housing Authority has continued its relationship with a specialized soft-ware developer, Sam 
Stone of Cyb'erSense Training & Consulting. Mr. Stone, a life-long Swampscott resident has developed 
software specifically for the smaller housing authorities. The regular use of the specialized software has 
led more efficient administration of over one hundred public housing units. The Swampscott Housing 
Authority continues to cooperate with the sponsoring churches and synagogues of Swampscott and with 
the Swampscott Senior Center in the distrit)ution of donated food at Duncan Terrace and Doherty Circle. 
Once a month, the Inter-FaiUi Food Pantry provides free food for elderly and handicapped residents of 



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Duncan Terrace and Doherty Circle. Many of the residents of our elderly/handicapped communities count 
on these bags of groceries, so generously provided by the Food Pantry, to tie them over to the beginning 
of the month. The tenants and the Authority are very grateful to the Inter-Faith Food Pantry, the 
Swampscott Senior Center personnel and the volunteers of each of the organization for their generous 
contribution of time and money to our needy and infirmed. 

Once again the Swampscott Housing Authority would like to thank Swampscott Police Patrolman, 
Saverio (Savy) Caruso for his invaluable assistance as the Swampscott Police Department liaison to the 
Housing Authority. The Authority wishes to acknowledge the assistance of the Swampscott Fire and 
Police Departments and the Action Ambulance Company for their consistently professional, yet 
compassionate demeanor while responding to the numerous medical assistance and "Are You Ok Calls" 
especially at the elderly/handicapped communities. The Swampscott Housing Authority would also like to 
acknowledge the contributions of other Town departments and officials to the fulfillment of the Housing 
Authority mission of providing safe, sanitary, low cost housing to qualified tenants. We gratefully 
acknowledge the efforts of Gino Cresta and the Department of Public Works for many services, especially 
the sanding and salting the elderly housing parking lots during the winter, the Wire Inspector, Jim Samms 
and the Plumbing Inspector Peter McCarriston as well as. Fire Prevention Officer, the Health Department 
and the Swampscott FEMA Director, Kevin Breen. 

The Board of Governors, the Executive Director, and the staff of the Swampscott Housing 
Authority continue to be committed to providing safe, comfortable and affordable housing for qualified 
tenants. 

Respectfully submitted, 

James L. Hughes 
Chairperson 



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MBTA ADVISORY BOARD 



Swampscott Representative 
Joseph J. Balsama 

The MBTA Advisory Board is made up of representatives from 175 cities and towns that are 
serviced by the !\^BTA. The office is located at 17V Tremont Street, 4th Floor, Boston, Massachusetts 
021 10-1020. Paul Regan is the Executive Director. The telephone number is (617) 426-6054. Fax (617) 
451-2054. E-Mail: advbrd@erols.com; web site:; www.mbtadvisaryboard.org. The function of the Board 
is to advise the MBTA on policy maters and approve the operating budget. The Advisory Board's budget 
can be no more than one-quarter of one percent of the MBTA assessments on cities and towns. For the 
2009 calendar year , the Advisory Board budget was $366,215. 

The chairman is David Cohen, the Mayor of Newton. The Executive assistant is Deborah Gaul. 
The clerk is Vineet Gupter of Boston . 

Meetings of the full Advisory Board were held on November 6, 2008, March 24, 2009, and May 
28, 2009. All meetings were held on the second floor of the State Transportation Building at 10 Park 
Plaza in Boston. 

The MBTA services frie Town of Swampscott directiy tiirough buses and commuter rail, and 
indirectly by the Blue Line, when commuters drive to Wonderland Station in Revere and park and board 
the Blue Line trains for Boston. The latest train and bus schedules, which change four times a year are 
available at the TownClerk's office, the Swampscott Public Library , and several other places around town. 
THE RIDE, (the MBTA 's paratranset serwce) , which ti-ansports people with disabilities, is administered by 
the Greater Lynn Senior Services, Inc. (GLSS), 105 Summit Drive, Peabody, MA 01960. The telephone 
is (978-573-9300). More information can be obtained from tiie Swampscott Council On Aging at 781-596- 
8866. 

Some items that may be of interest to the citizens of Swampscott include: 

1 . Swampscott's MBTA assessment for FY 2009 was $284,854. 

2. Daniel Grabauskas, former General Manager of the MBTA. had his contract bought out. The Acting 
General Manager is now William Mitchell, formerly the M BTA's General Council. 

3. The Secretary of Transportation suspended the fare increase hearings and announced the 
appointment of David D' Alessandro, former CEO of the John Hancock Company, to conduct a stem to 
stern review of the MBTA finances and operations. 

4. All 94 Blue Line cars are now in service. 

5. Renovations are now completed at Maaverick Station on the Blue Line. 

6. Nearly all (but one) Blue Line stations now are able to accommodate 6 car trains. 

7. The Legislator has completed the Transportation Reform Legislation. As of November 1st the MBTA 
Advisory Board lost the power of approval over the MBTA's budget. 



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Metropolitan Area Planning Council 

Annual Report 2009 

The Metropolitan Area Planning Council (MAPC) is a regional planning agency serving 
the people who live and work in Metro Boston. With a mission to promote smart growth 
and regional collaboration, MAPC's work is guided by our regional plan, "MetroFuture: 

Making a Greater Boston Region. " 



Despite economically challenging times, MAPC has proudly helped the 101 cities and 
towns in Greater Boston in navigating the recession with an eye toward preserving our 
region's vast resources for future generations. Whether in the area of public safety, 
open space preservation, clean water, affordable housing, transportation equity, 
sustainable development or inter-municipal cooperation, MAPC is uniquely positioned to 
bring cities and towns together for the betterment of the region as a whole. Our work 
encompasses many facets of living and working in Massachusetts, but is always guided 
by smart growth principles, and the philosophy that collaborative approaches can best 
solve regional issues. 

Guiding Future Development and Preservation 

With MAPC's progressive new regional plan, "MetroFuture: Making a Greater Boston Region," the 
agency is helping to guide both development and preservation in Metropolitan Boston, now through 2030. 
The plan was approved in December 2008, and campaigns for its implementation were launched to the 
public at an energizing event in June 2009. With the plan officially In place, MAPC's work has turned to 
advancing and measuring its implementation. Since the plan's adoption, MAPC staff has worked hard 
collecting input from hundreds of MetroFuture friends and supporters, whose ideas have helped craft four 
initial MetroFuture campaigns: Green Jobs and Energy, Local Smart Growth Planning, Transportation 
Investment and Zoning Reform. At the June 9, 2009 MetroFuture kickoff event, more than 300 people 
gathered to discuss and advise MAPC on strategies for advancing the first three campaigns. MAPC also 
released "From Plan to Action: A MetroFuture Summary," an accessible guide to MetroFuture goals and 
implementation strategies, which is available online at www.mapc.org and www.metrofuture.org. In 2010, 
MAPC will continue to advance the MetroFuture campaigns and engage the "Friends of MetroFuture" in 
this work. We are also establishing a Regional Indicators Program to assess the region's progress in 
achieving MetroFuture's goals, as well as MAPC's effectiveness at undertaking the implementation 
strategies. We are pleased that two of our partners in establishing the MetroFuture plan are continuing 
their support of implementation. The Boston Foundation has contributed to MetroFuture implementation 
broadly, while an anonymous foundation has funded establishment of an Equity Report Card. One way 
MAPC is advancing MetroFuture is through our work with the Massachusetts Smart Growth Alliance 
(MSGA). Through MSGA, MAPC has successfully advocated for policies and initiatives that advance 
sustainable and equitable development, including increased state investment in transit and other 
transportation options, the state's "Gateway Cities" revitalization program, and meaningful zoning reform. 



205 



MSGA is also working witti the Massacliusetts Water Resources Autliority (MWRA) to make sure that 
expansion of the MWRA is accompanied by smart growth requirements and water conservation. 

Through the IVISGA, MAPC is also working with MassPIRG - the IVlassachusetts Public Interest Research 
Group - as well as Smart Growth America and other groups on the national "Transportation for America" 
campaign, which urges federal transportation policies that are consistent with smart growth principles. We 
are also working with leaders from across New England in the "New England Regional Rail Coalition," an 
association of planning, environmental, municipal and business groups from all six New England states 
that came together this year to improve the region's competitiveness for rail investments. MAPC also 
counts itself a member of Smart Growth America's "State and Regional Caucus," which brings smart 
growth-focused organization leaders from across the country. 

MAPC is also a founding member of "Our Transportation Future" (OTP), a coalition of business, labor, 
planning and environmental groups who are pushing for increased investment in the state's transportation 
infrastructure. OTP played a key role in the 2009 transportation debate around reform and revenue. 
Although our effort to achieve an increase in the gas tax failed, the Legislature did commit $275 million in 
funding to transportation from an increase in the sales tax. 

MAPC strives to make every major development project in the region compatible with MetroFuture and 
the state's Sustainable Development Principles. One way we do this is through our active involvement in 
the Massachusetts Environmental Protection Act (MEPA) process. As we study and comment on major 
developments, MAPC communicates our perspective and recommendations to developers, 
municipalities, and state officials. In 2009, MAPC evaluated and commented on several key projects, 
including the Urban Ring, the South Coast Rail project, Lowell Junction, Beacon at 495, Route 18 in 
Weymouth and RiverGreen Technology Park. Of special note is the "Commons at Prospect Hill" project in 
Waltham. MAPC collaborated with the 128 Central Corridor Coalition - which includes Burlington, 
Lexington, Lincoln, Waltham and Weston - to submit several joint comment letters to MEPA for this 
project. 

Our MEPA comments consistently seek to minimize and mitigate traffic impacts, to expand transit, 
bicycle, and pedestrian alternatives, to safeguard critical environmental resources, to limit storm water 
impacts through "Low Impact Development (LID)," and to encourage a mixture of commercial and 
residential uses. 



Better Planning through Technical Assistance 

Cities and towns throughout the region continue to seek out MAPC for technical assistance on a variety of 
issues. Much of MAPC's "on the ground" technical assistance work for municipalities has been made 
possible through funding from the District Local Technical Assistance program (DLTA). This program was 
created by the Legislature and Governor Deval Patrick in 2006 to assist communities with a variety of 
land use planning activities, especially expedited permitting of commercial and industrial projects. The 
program is now entering its third funding round, and it has been expanded to assist municipalities to 
regionalize planning, procurement and service delivery. 

Using DLTA funding matched by the town, MAPC worked with Danvers to create mixed-use bylaws for 
targeted portions of Danversport. The bylaws were crafted after extensive public input, including a "Visual 
Preference Survey" using Photoshop and Pictometry imaging tools, as well as a survey of Danvers 



206 



residents on industrial-type uses. In addition, ihe "Danvers Mixed Use Report" suggested zoning revisions 
to otiier targeted industrial areas, and designed and presented a public program on the feasibility of using 
the state's 40R Smart Growth Zoning program to redevelop parts of downtown Danvers. 

MAPC staff also helped several municipalities to apply for federal stimulus money made available through 
the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). With assistance from MAPC, Revere received 
$485,000 from the U.S. Department of Energy to help pay for the installation of a new roof with built-in 
photovoltaic panels and high efficiency air conditioning units at the Beachmont Elementary School. 

Throughout 2009, MAPC develop the Maiden Master Plan, utilizing Community Viz software, which helps 
community members visualize themselves inside four different scenarios for future residential 
development in Maiden. MAPC staff used Community Viz in a live demonstration to compare alternative 
zoning scenarios and their impacts on different Maiden neighborhoods. Participants provided instant 
feedback on each scenario using wireless keypads; following discussion, they voted on their preferred 
option. MAPC began work on a Housing Production Plan for Bellingham. The plan includes an analysis of 
housing supply and demand, an analysis of barriers to development, a map series, and will include an 
extensive implementation plan with strategies to help the town achieve and maintain affordable housing 
goals. The work will also include formation of a "Municipal Affordable Housing Trust Fund Board of 
Trustees" to oversee implementation activities. 

MAPC staff worked on housing publications this year, including one with The Citizens Housing and 
Planning Association (CHAPA), titled "The Use of Chapter 40R in Massachusetts As a Tool for Smart 
Growth and Affordable Housing Production." An advisory committee on the project will explore policy 
improvements in light of the information revealed by the report. Staff also assisted the Massachusetts 
Housing Partnership on a Municipal Affordable Housing Trust Fund guidebook, which explains strategies 
for setting up a trust and gaining approval from the local legislative body. 

This year, MAPC began working with municipalities that wanted help collaborating on the joint delivery of 
services, and these efforts were also funded under DLTA. Two of the projects focused on consolidating 
public health services among Ariington, Belmont and Lexington, and between Melrose and Wakefield. 
The Melrose/Wakefield project was implemented mid-year and met with success by year's end. Working 
with the public health directors of Ariington, Belmont and Lexington, MAPC staff helped to build an 
organizational framework and governance structure for a single regional health department designed to 
serve the three towns with improved service quality through a cost-effective approach. Action is expected 
at the 2010 spring town meetings. Several other DLTA projects addressed public safety concerns. In the 
first, MAPC assisted in creating a regional emergency communications center (RECC). A vendor was 
selected at the end of the year and the study will begin in January. A second project would regionalize an 
emergency planning committee (REPC) among seven communities in and around Nonvood. MAPC 
researched model organizations, proposed a structure and set out a plan for Implementation. 

Another pair of projects focused on consolidation of fire services. Melrose and Wakefield asked MAPC to 
help them examine the potential of jointly providing fire department services, such as inspections, fire 
safety services and dispatch. Ashland and Hopkinton asked MAPC to help them evaluate combining their 
fire departments as a means of mitigating economic pressures. MAPC staff, aided by fire service 
professionals, collected data, analyzed response times and build-out trends, station locations and 
equipping and staffing, to deliver a report of findings and recommendations for next steps. Through our 
work with school departments on the North Shore, MAPC staff also developed a combined teacher 
training schedule for seven departments and helped create a joint job posting system designed to 
improve applicant pools, provide efficient candidate screening and lower advertising costs. 



207 



Encouraging and Supporting Collaboration among Municipalities 

Subregional councils are a primary means of communication between IVIAPC and member communities, 
and MAPC continually seeks to expand participation in these councils. Each municipality In the MAPC 
region is included in one of eight subregions, led by a staff coordinator; the Metrowest Growth 
Management Committee plays this role in MetroWest, but is governed by an independent board, on which 
MAPC serves. 

Subregions provide a venue for citizen input Into regional planning as well as a forum for local elected 
officials, planners, community organizations, legislators and businesses to exchange information. Over 
the past year, subregional meetings addressed a wide variety of planning topics, such as the Ocean 
Management Act, the Green Communities Act, Scenic Byways, water usage, using GIS, economic 
development and more. 

MAPC also facilitates regional dialogue and joint municipal action among chief elected and appointed 
officials in the region. Among the most prominent of such efforts are the Metro Mayors Coalition and the 
North Shore Coalition, which bring together mayors and city/town managers to collaborate across 
municipal boundaries. 

The Metro Mayors helped further the mission of MAPC this year by responding quickly to the emerging 
economic crisis. MAPC has taken an active role in working to help cities and towns avoid layoffs and 
become more efficient, through efforts like legislative advocacy in support of a comprehensive municipal 
relief package, of local options taxes, of participation in the Group Insurance Commission (GIC), and by 
studying the feasibility of regional 911 call centers in the Metro Boston region. MAPC also helped cities 
share information and develop strategies to cope with the foreclosure crisis. 

A regional anti-youth violence initiative is another example of regional collaboration that MAPC helps to 
foster. Over the past three years, MAPC helped nine Metro Mayors Coalition cities, 10 North Shore 
Coalition municipalities, and two MetroWest towns to secure more than $2 million annually in funding 
through the state's Charles Shannon Community Safety Initiative. MAPC is the fiduciary agent and 
program manager for these funds, helping communities to implement multi-jurisdictional, multi-disciplinary 
strategies to combat youth violence, gang violence and substance abuse. In August 2009, the Metro 
Mayors Coalition hosted its Second Annual Shannon Grant Basketball Tournament in Somerville. 
Participants in the tournament included law enforcement, prevention partners and youth, 

MAPC continues to perform fiduciary, planning, and project management services for the Northeast 
Homeland Security Regional Advisory Council (NERAC), managing $4.65 million in grant funding for 85 
cities and towns north and west of Boston. In 2009, MAPC took on the role of fiduciary for all four regional 
homeland security councils across the Commonwealth, managing $13.4 million in grant funds and 
performing grant management, procurement and financial services for all four, while managing a team of 
three other regional planning agency partners who staff and support the Southeast, Central and Western 
councils. MAPC also participates in statewide homeland security planning efforts along with participants 
from several state agencies and all homeland security regions. 

MAPC has expanded its fiscal management role in the public health arena as the "host agent" for the 
Region 4A Public Health Coalition, a cooperative of 34 public health departments ranging from 
Wilmington to Wrentham, between 1-95 and 1-495. MAPC assists the coalition in utilizing more than 
$485,000 for emergency and pandemic preparedness efforts. As H1N1 "Swine Flu" pandemic concerns 



208 



spread across the state, MAPC hosted an additional $1.2 million in grant funding to provide vaccine 
clinics throughout the 4A region. 

Preparing for Natural Disasters 

After recent storm events - such as the Northeast ice storm in December 2009, and several heavy rains 
storms that caused flooding this summer - residents across the region are more aware than ever of the 
severe effects of natural disasters. To help allay these effects, MAPC completed Natural Hazard 
Mitigation Plans for 32 cities and towns in 2009, on top of the 41 other plans completed in recent years. 
Each plan includes a GIS map series depicting areas subject to various natural hazards, an inventory of 
critical facilities and infrastructure, a vulnerability analysis, and a mitigation strategy with recommended 
actions to reduce vulnerability. 

In 2010, MAPC will be completing the final set of plans for the region, helping 17 more communities. 
MAPC will also begin work this year on updating and renewing the Hazard Mitigation plans for 19 
communities on the North Shore and South Shore, whose original plans were completed in 2005. FEMA 
requires that the plans be renewed every five years to reflect current data and conditions. 

In many communities, Brownfield sites such as abandoned industrial facilities hold much potential for 
redevelopment and community revitalization if properly cleaned up. MAPC is working collaboratively with 
Peabody and Salem using a $1 million EPA Brownfields grant to assess several Brownfield sites in the 
two cities. The sites are important for Peabody's plans to mitigate flooding in the downtown, and also for 
the expansion of open space, greenways, and economic development in both cities. 



IVIunicipal Savings through Shared Procurement 

Some 35 communities are saving up to 20 percent on purchases of office supplies, paving services, and 
road maintenance by participating in MAPC's Regional Services Consortiums. MAPC performed multiple 
procurements for municipalities in four consortiums in the South Shore, MetroWest, North Shore, Metro 
Northwest, and Merrimack Valley regions. Similar savings were realized by the 300 members of the 
Greater Boston Police Council (GBPC). During 2009, MAPC continued to broaden its array of GBPC- 
sponsored vehicle contracts to provide choices, convenience, and quality for public safety departments 
needing police cruisers, SUVs, general use vehicles, a range of trucks from light to very heavy duty, and 
a selection of hybrid vehicles. Overall, 187 vehicles were purchased, totaling more than $12 million in 
sales. 

In 2009, MAPC began its partnership with the Fire Chiefs Association of Massachusetts (FCAM) to 
develop a collective procurement service model to address the high cost of fire apparatus and 
ambulances. MAPC procurement services will continue to be attractive as local governments face 
mounting budget constraints. Making Data Accessible to All Good planning requires access to good data. 
MAPC works to collect and analyze regional data and to make this data available to the public, while 
helping to increase analytic capacity at the local level. Users throughout the region and around the world 
can access information about MAPC communities through our ever-expanding Web-based mapping site, 
www.MetroBostonDataCommon .org . 



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In an effort to develop an even more effective next generation of the DataCommon, MAPC is working 
closely with our colleagues In the Open Indicators Consortium (OIC), which includes data intermediaries 
from throughout the nation. OIC is working with researchers at UMass Lowell to develop an "open source" 
technology to add more powerful analysis tools for researchers and a more intuitive interface for novice 
users. 

Although users can access the DataCommon for most of their needs, MAPC still responds to daily data 
requests from municipalities, organizations, individuals, the media and state agencies. In 2009, MAPC 
answered more than 200 on-demand data requests. In July 2009, MAPC held its biennial "Data Day" 
conference and received an overwhelming response, with more than 350 in-person attendees and at 
least 100 participating in a webcast. This conference, sponsored by MAPC, Northeastern University and 
The Boston Foundation's Boston Indicators Project, helps communities and non-profits to expand their 
capacity to use technology and data to advance their goals. 

MAPC continues to incorporate cutting-edge planning and technology tools into our region's planning 
processes. Using Google SketchUp and Community Viz, MAPC created a 3-D computer model of 
Weymouth Landing to enable planning workshop participants to take a "virtual tour" of the district - as it 
looks now and as it might look with different types of new development. The visualization tool helped 
participants to focus future solutions and supported a lively discussion about the types of development 
that should be encouraged. A Digital Media and Learning grant from the MacArthur Foundation funded 
the development of the region's first planning video game. The Participatory Chinatown Project, a 
partnership with Emerson College and the Asian Community Development Corporation, is exploring how 
a planning video game that utilizes a 3-D virtual environment can facilitate citizen engagement in a 
neighborhood master planning process. The 3-D virtual environment augments the debate about new 
development, bringing in additional information, tracking effects of different decisions, and showing the 
results of those decisions so participants can experience what the space would look like under varied 
scenarios. MAPC is an official Census affiliate, working with our municipalities and the Donahue Institute 
at UMass Boston to prepare for a complete and accurate count during the 2010 Federal Census, and to 
ensure that subsequent annual Census estimates are also accurate. MAPC provides training and 
assistance to municipalities and community-based organizations to help ensure that everyone in our 
region is counted. 



Getting Around the Region 

Transportation - and equitable access to reliable transit - is a major focus of MAPC's work. The agency 
serves as vice-chair of the Boston Region Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO), which establishes 
transportation funding priorities for the region. We conduct studies and develop plans to support 
transportation improvements, and advocate for a well-funded, accessible transportation system that 
provides choice and mobility. We also encourage the coordination of transportation and land use policies 
at the state, regional and municipal level. 

MAPC is working along Route 9 - with Southborough, Framingham, Natick and Wellesley ~ to plan for 
anticipated growth in that area. In Phase 1 of this study, MAPC estimated the potential retail, office and 
industrial growth allowed under existing zoning adjacent to the roadway. This allowed MAPC to estimate 
likely increases in daily vehicular trips, as well as morning and evening peaks, for 56 zones in the 
corridor. In Phase 2, MAPC and the communities are studying alternative land use patterns to determine 
if these changes, along with mitigation measures such as improved transit, can allow growth without 
gridlock along Route 9. Future economic development along parts of the already congested Route 128 



210 



corridor could lead to traffic increases of more than 50 percent on 128 and on local streets. In 2010, 
MAPC will complete a corridor plan with Weston, Lincoln, Waltham, Lexington and Burlington calling for 
establishment of a multi-modal transportation center along the Fitchburg commuter rail line, along with 
other steps to increase bus, pedestrian, and bicyclist opportunities. 

To reduce existing and anticipated congestion and safety problems along Route 495 between Route 290 
and the Mass Pike, MAPC and the Central Massachusetts Regional Planning Commission (CMRPC) 
worked with area communities and local business groups to look at a range of roadway, transit and land 
use options. The report's findings will be the starting point for a more detailed follow-up study to identify 
the specific steps to relieve congestion, to improve safety and to manage land use. 

This year, MAPC broke new ground by working with Boston, Brookline, Cambridge and Somerville to 
secure a vendor to establish a regional bike sharing network, modeled after a successful system in 
Montreal. The system is projected to have several hundred bike-share stations throughout Boston, 
Cambridge, Somerville, Brookline, and Arlington within the next several years. The goal of the program is 
to increase mobility options within the Inner Core and to replace short automobile trips with biking. MAPC 
managed the procurement process and is helping each city establish contracts with the vendor, The 
Public Bike System Company. Finally, In 2010 MAPC will work with communities along Route 2 to better 
coordinate regional transit service and prepare for the effects of large transportation changes along the 
corridor in the coming years. 



Charting a Course to Regional Prosperity 

MAPC's economic development work is based on a Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy, 
updated annually. This report presents current economic trends in a format useful to public officials and 
community-based organizations. It is also an important fundraising tool. In 2009, MAPC leveraged $3.5 
million in funding from the U.S. Economic Development Administration to help fund new research and 
development space for the Fraunhofer Center for Sustainable Energy Systems in Cambridge. The Center 
is dedicated to serving the research needs of the sustainable energy industry, helping established 
industry as well as first time entrepreneurs move clean energy technologies from the laboratory to the 
production line. MAPC also collaborated with North Shore InnoVentures, a life science business 
incubator, to locate the new Cleantech InnoVenture Center (CIVC) in the heart of Lynn. CIVC specializes 
in catering to the needs of clean energy and clean technology businesses that have already proven the 
value of their new product and are preparing to manufacture. MAPC is supporting the innovation 
economy in Massachusetts by working collaboratively with business-driven organizations in every part of 
the region. Job creation remains the goal. What has changed are the tools we usp to create jobs: 
information technology, transfer of knowledge, communication systems, and decision support tools that, 
together, harness the creative energy of people from different industry sectors, professional backgrounds, 
and cultures. MAPC is a regional information hub that catalogs commonly-held barriers to component 
parts of the innovation economy and facilitates a unified response on how to best mitigate these barriers. 



From Beacon Hill to Capitol Hill 

Making change on Beacon Hill requires dedication to advocacy and coalition-building. Under the 
guidance of our Legislative Committee, MAPC works with the Patrick Administration, legislators, and 
stakeholders of all stripes to advance legislation and policies across a diverse set of issues. These issues 



211 



include budgetary appropriations for progranns as wide-ranging as the Charles Shannon Community 
Safety Initiative, the District Local Technical Assistance Program, and the Census Estimates Program. 
MAPC advocated successfully for passage of numerous bills, from legislation enabling cities and towns to 
locally opt for meals and hotel taxes, to the recently passed reforms of our transportation system. We 
continue efforts to make it easier for cities and towns to regionalize municipal services, to improve and 
better fund the successful Community Preservation Act, to create a system to convey and reuse surplus 
state land in ways that are consistent with smart growth, and to reform health insurance for municipal 
employees. 

MAPC is also increasingly active in Washington, working with the Obama Administration and our 
Congressional delegation to revamp the way transportation is funded in America, with an increased 
emphasis on lowering greenhouse gas emissions through a greater emphasis on transit. We are 
collaborating closely with the National Association of Regional Commissions and other allies to establish 
the so-called "sustainable and livable communities" program, which will fund the development and 
implementation of regional plans like MetroFuture. 



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Metropolitan Area Planning Council 
North Shore Task Force 
Annual Report 2009 

Beverly, Danvers, Essex, Hamilton, Gloucester, Ipswich, Marichester by the Sea, Marblehead, 
Middleton, Nahant, Peabody, Rockport, Salem, Swampscott, Topsfield and Wenham 

During 2009, the North Shore Task Force took part in a variety of activities, including: 

> Reviewed and offered input into a variety of regional transportation programs, 
including the Transportation Improvement Program, the Unified Planning and Work 
Program and the Regional Transportation Plan, as well as opportunities to participate 
in Transportation Demand Management and Suburban Mobility programs. 

> Worked to introduce the newly formed North Shore Transportation Management 
Association as a partner in promoting alternatives to single-occupancy car travel. The 
mission of the North Shore TMA, which began in the summer of 2008, is to bring 
together businesses, institutions, developers, organizations and municipalities to 
address shared traffic-related issues. It aims to reduce traffic congestion and vehicle 
emissions while improving access to and within the North Shore. 

> Began implementation of the newly adopted MetroFuture Plan by helping to identify 
priority implementation strategies for the North Shore and the MAPC region. 

> Partnered with the MA Department of Energy Resources to sponsor the North Shore 
Clean Energy Forum which featured case studies of North Shore municipal clean 
energy actions and information on the DOER Green Communities Program. 

> Presented two workshops on sea level rise and climate adaptation in conjunction with 
Salem State College, the MA Department of Conservation and Recreation, and MA 
Coastal Zone Management. Participants were able to learn about efforts to map 
local sea level rise, current climate change adaptation initiatives, the FEMA flood 
hazard mapping revisions and responses to sea level rise such as the Storm Smart 
Coasts Program. 

> Held a state transportation reform information meeting. 

> Conducted an onsite tour of Avalon Danvers, the award winning adaptive reuse of 
the former Danvers State Hospital property. The community includes 433 one, two, 
and three-bedroom rental apartments, in twelve separate buildings. These buildings 
have been constructed in a range of styles, from the smallest two-story direct entry 
building with eight apartment homes, to the traditional three-story breezeway 
stacked-flat building containing 24 apartment homes, to the largest center-corridor, 
elevator-access, mid-rise building containing 99 apartment homes. 

> Partnered with staff from the Merrimack Regional Planning Commission and the 
Massachusetts Bays Program to present methods and case studies on meeting peak 
summer water demand, including the use of sustainable landscaping practices. 

> Identified ongoing North Shore planning and community development issues through 
Community Exchange, in which local planners and decision makers share key issues 
or developments with fellow NSTF attendees. 

> Presented the draft MA Ocean Management Plan to North Shore communities and 
submitted comments on the draft plan 



213 



> Worked with MAPC's North Shore Coalition to present a workshop on opportunities 
on regionalizing municipal services, offering examples such as the Arlington, Belmont 
and Lexington Regional Health Project. 

> Heard monthly updates from the MARC Legislative Committee and offered comments 
to the Committee on legislation pertinent to North Shore communities. 



214 



NORTH SHORE REGIONAL VOCATIONAL SCHOOL DISTRICT 
30 LOG BRIDGE ROAD, MIDDLETON, MA 01949-2806 
www.nsths.mec.edu 

ANNUAL REPORT (Short Form) 
JANUARY 1, 2009 - DECEMBER 31, 2009 

William Jackson - Swampscott Representative 
North Shore Regional Vocational School Committee 

Amelia P. O'Malley, Superintendent-Director 
North Shore Regional Vocational School District 

Merger Study 

The plan to build a $133 million high school that proponents say will transform vocational education on 
the North Shore finally became a reality in December. 

The Beverly City Council voted 8-0 to join the new vocational school district, becoming the ninth 
community to sign on to the project thereby moving the proposal past the threshold required by state law. 

The new school is scheduled to open in 2013 in Danvers and will open up spots for the nearly 200 North 
Shore students who are turned away from North Shore Technical High School and Essex Agricultural and 
Technical High School every year due to lack of space. 

The vocational school will be built on the campus of Essex Aggie and will accommodate 1,440 students 
in 23 subjects ranging from carpentry to animal science to culinary arts. It will represent a merger of 
North Shore Tech, Essex Aggie and the Peabody high school vocational program. 

The state has promised to pay 74% of the cost of building the new school, or $98.6 million. Another $4 
million will be raised by the anticipated sale of North Shore Tech. The communities that join the district 
will share the remaining cost, about $31 million, based on how many students they send to the school. 

Administration 

The North Shore Regional Vocational School District Committee, comprised of one member appointed to 
represent each member community, is the goveming body of the School District. The Superintendent- 
Director and the administrative team carry out the pohcies of the District School Committee and oversee the 
daily operation of the school. 

Enrollment 

Student enrollment as of October 1, 2009 is 451. Students cite their interpersonal relationships with teachers, 
counselors, and administrators, and the vocational/technical programs as the reasons for application. There 
continues to be a shortage of space for classrooms, shop areas, the library and the cafeteria. 

Students participate in programs in Automotive Technology, Carpentry, Commercial Art, Collision 
Repair, Cosmetology, Culinary Arts, Electrical, Information Systems Technology, Graphic Arts, Health 
Technology, Machine Technology, and Masonry. 

Curriculum 

In 12"^ grade science we offer three electives that include: Human Biology which now includes 
biotechnology as a significant part of the curriculum, a revised Physics curriculum, and a long time 
popular environmental biology course Field Studies in the Natural Sciences. All of our courses are 
laboratory based, college preparatory, consistent with state requirements, and are designed to assist with 
our students' career and educational goals. 



215 



General and Program Advisory Committees 

The Program Advisory Committees meet twice per year to discuss suggestions for improving our 
vocational-technical programs. The instructors use these meetings to learn about the latest equipment, 
materials, techniques, and technology being used in industry. Improvement in curriculum and delivery of 
instruction are directly related to these suggestions and industrial standards. 

The General Advisory Committee consists of one member from each of the Program Advisory 
Committees and the school Principal. Each member has specific recommendations from their advisory 
committee and advises how to improve the vocational delivery system and maintain the high industrial 
standards and integrity of each program. The General Advisory Committee discusses articulation 
agreements, integration into the curriculum for academics and career areas, the OSHA 10-hour card 
online training, and the diversity representation of our advisory committees. 

Vocational Career and Technical Area 

The Career and Technical Areas continue to work on integration projects with the academic faculty 
helping students understand the importance of academic concepts in the student's technical area. 

The students and their parents will also be able to review their updated competency listing on line using 
Career Cruising. The Vocational Coordinators and Guidance Counselors are working together to re- 
enforce employability skills and entrepreneurship. 

Safety continues to be a primary concern. Seniors will not participate in the COOP program without a 
Career Safe OSHA 1 hour card or be able to graduate. Sophomores complete the 1 0-hour Career Safe 
program and received their OSHA 10 hour card before they can participate in the technical program 
junior year. 

In addition, students continue to maintain their working portfolios and seniors will begin to create their 
Senior Showcase portfolio including their electronic portfolio. All students will be presenting their 
portfolios to faculty, staff and members from their industry allowing them to develop their public 
speaking skills. This should help them with job interviews and their college admission process. 

Technology Integration 

Throughout grades 9-12, students are developing skills in word processing, Internet, global 
communications, spreadsheets, graphics, desktop publishing, and multimedia. They collect and apply 
data, learn ethical and legal aspects of technology, manipulate graphics, learn text and page layout skills, 
and use various multimedia tools to express their views and creativity. They develop these skills through 
a series of projects integrated into the curriculum. Teachers work with a technology specialist in order to 
create projects that combine their curriculum and technology in a meaningful manner. 

Many teachers and our administrators are incorporating Google Docs into their repertoire of technology 
skills. Google Docs is an online site providing the ability to share documents, spreadsheets or 
presentations with friends or co-workers. Administrators work collaboratively creating agendas for 
meetings. Teachers help students to better collaborate on projects both in and out of school using this 
site. 

Our Special Education Department uses a Tablet PC lab. A Tablet PC is the same as any other laptop 
however; it is equipped with touch screen technology which allows the user to operate the computer with 
a stylus or digital pen, instead of a keyboard or mouse. By rotating and folding the screen it transforms 
into a tablet configuration. Using a stylus, students can make handwritten notes and drawings in a manner 
comparable to the way in which pen and paper are used. Students using Tablet PCs can actively 
participate in classroom presentations and exercises by drawing responses on screen. Taking handwritten 
notes and drawing diagrams in a class increases productivity and retention of information. 



January 2009 - December 2009 



216 



The North Shore Regional Vocational School District website has a new look. Its design has been 
changed and updated ( www.nsths.mec.edu") . The new school video can be viewed on the home page. 

Special Education Department 

The special education program is inclusive in nature. Inclusion classes are offered in all grades and in 
every major academic subject area. These classes are co-taught by members of the general education and 
special education staff In conjunction with this, many special needs students receive academic support 
services in the Curriculum Support Center, under the direction of the Special Education Administrator. 

Athletic Department 

The Boy's & Girl's Basketball teams had a good number of students play at multiple levels during the 
winter season. The boy's team qualified for the State Tournament losing in the quarter finals of the North 
to Winthrop. 

The spring of 2009 saw the Softball team win another league championship and qualifying for the state 
and vocational tournaments. The team became the State Vocational Champions and advanced to the 
semi-fmals of the North Sectionals in the State Tourney. 

The Baseball team also won the league championship and qualified for the state and vocational 
tournaments. The team advanced to the quarter finals of the North Sectionals before being eliminated by 
North Reading. 

The spring of 2008 also saw the start of a Boy's and Girl's Lacrosse co-op team with Essex Aggie. The 
number of participants was high necessitating the hiring of an assistant coach and running a junior varsity 
program. 

Girls Lacrosse, sponsored by Essex Aggie, also had a good tumout and played a varsity and junior varsity 
schedule. 

Paul Worth took over the head coaching position of the football team after the departure of Mike Drouin. 
The football team qualified to play in the Vocational Bowl and a chance to make the State Playoffs 
instead. 

Girl's soccer, in its second year, won a second league championship and qualified for the State 
Tournament. The participation level is high resulting in a full junior varsity schedule. 

Boys Soccer saw an increase in numbers this year, necessitating the start of a junior varsity team. The 
varsity team had a good season finishing in 2"'' place in the league and qualifying for the State 
Tournament. 

Fall cheering, in its second year as co-op with Essex Aggie, improved their performance level this year 
but was hit hard by the HlNl virus just around competition time. However, the team still qualified for 
State Competitions. 

The programs are running well and the participation rate continues to be very high for a Vocational 
School. 

School-to-Work/PIacement 

Entering the world of work in the 21^' century takes more than vocational/technical skills or academic 
success. Good employees must be able to be good listeners, take direction, set goals and develop positive 
working relationships with supervisors and co-workers. North Shore Tech's goal has always been to 
develop our students' maturity and understanding of what faces them in the world of work. 



January 2009 - December 2009 



217 



Tech Prep 

Tech Prep, a federally funded program, establishes articulation agreements between high school students 
and post-secondary institutions. This program develops career pathways that allow for a seamless 
transition from high school to college programs of study, creating opportunities for high school students 
to earn college credits. 

We continue to work with North Shore Community College reviewing established articulations in ITS, 
Health, Marketing and Culinary and developed a new articulation in Graphic Communications. 

Health Office Report 

Health services offered at North Shore Technical High School include first aid, health education, health 
promotion and prevention of illness in a caring safe environment. Emphasis is to prevent illness and 
injuries, to minimize impairments to learning and to make community/school referrals as appropriate. 

In the spring there was ongoing reporting to the Middleton Health Dept. when HlNl became an issue. 
We had no confirmed reports of HlNl this school year. 

One change in health services was a change in nursing personnel. Ms. Holman left to teach Health 
Assisting classes and Mrs. Kersker took over the school nurse position midyear. 

Transportation Department 

The Transportation Department has a fleet consisting of twenty (20) buses, fourteen -71 passenger buses, 
one- 18 passenger bus, three buses dedicated to the building trades, two -35 passenger buses and also one- 
8 passenger van. The Transportation Department provided transportation to and from school on a daily 
basis for approximately 457 students and provides buses three days a week for after school activities. 
Transportation was provided for many field trips throughout the school year and all the offsite activities, 
sports games, etc. 

Adult Education 

Adult Evening Education at North Shore is a self-supporting program that offers approximately sixty (60) 
vocational-technical classes that enhance the professional and personal lives of the adult members of our 
community. The Program serves nearly one thousand adult students that participate in a wide variety of 
courses. Popular fields of study include: computers, health, construction, machine technology, culinary, 
automotive, business and personal finance. A number of courses have state approval for professional and 
trade license preparation. 

Adult Education at North Shore provides a much-needed service and is embraced by the community as an 
outstanding educational opportunity. 

Business Office 

The Department of Revenue has certified the amount in our unencumbered excess and deficiency funds 
available July 1, 2009 at $466,284. 

The Fiscal 20 II Budget preparation is currently in process and will be presented to the District's Finance 
& Property Policy Sub-Committee in February and subsequently to the District's School Committee. At 
this point, we have not received financial data pertaining to fiscal 201 1 from the Department of 
Elementary & Secondary Education. 



North Shore Regional Vocational School District Committee 

January 2009 - December 2009 

218 



Beverly 

Boxford 

Danvers 

Essex 

Gloucester 

Hamilton 

Lynnfield 

Manchester-by-the-Sea 

Marblehead 

Middleton 

Nahant 

Rockport 

Salem 

Swampscott 

Topsfield 

Wenham 



Mr. Dean Porteous 

Mr. Michael Crowe 

Mr. Russell Fravel 

Mr. George R. Harvey, Chairman 

Ms. Melissa Teixeira 

Mr. David W. Ketcham 

Dr. Paul Anderson 

Mr. Joseph Sabella 

Mrs. Marcia Sweeney, Vice Chairman 

Mrs. Ellen Weitzler 

Mrs. Anne Senk 

Mr. Mark Small 

Mr. Thomas St. Pierre 

Mr. William Jackson 

Ms. Trudi Perry 

Mr. William O. Nichols, Secretary 



January 2009 - December 2009 



219 



PERSONNEL BOARD 

Peter C. McCarriston 
David S. Van Dam 
Debbie Friedlander 
Demise Dembkoski 
Nancy A. Lord, Ex-Officlo 

PERSONNEL DEPARTiVIENT 

Nancy A. Lord, Personnel Manager 

The Personnel Department continues in its practice of monitoring personnel policies and 
procedures to ensure fair and consistent employment practices for all Town employees and to maintain a 
safe, working environment that Is free from harassment and discrimination. 

The Personnel Department continues to assist management with the interpretation of the various 
collective bargaining agreements and the Personnel Policy Governing Compensation & Employment 
Benefits, which covers those employees who are exempt from a collective bargaining agreement. The 
department is responsible for maintaining attendance records to ensure proper use of sick, vacation, 
personal, FMLA and other leave time in accordance with the various contracts and the Personnel Policy. 

Over the past year, the Personnel Department has assisted in the hiring process for new 
employees, including the Part Time Clerical Assistant in the Assessor's office as well as approximately 
sixty five temporary, seasonal summer employees for the Recreation Department. The Personnel 
Department is also responsible for requesting Criminal Offender Record information (CORI) on all 
volunteers who work for the Senior Work Off program who my work with a vulnerable population, 
volunteers for the Recreation Department and all newly hired employees who are not exempt form this 
process. 

The Personnel Manager continues to conduct monthly Labor Management meetings in 
accordance with the Library and DPW union contracts and to hear grievances at the Step 2 process in 
accordance with the various collective bargaining agreements. In addition to confidential, personnel 
related issues, the Personnel Department is responsible for reporting workers compensation injuries, 
handling all required paperwork for civil service examinations, promotions, layoffs etc., preparing 
appointment and reappointment notification to individual positions, boards, committees and commissions, 
conducting salary surveys and serves as backup to the Board of Selectmen's office during the absence of 
the Administrative Assistant and as needed. 

Under the direction of the Town Administrator, the Personnel Department continues to implement 
new and established polices which provide useful guidelines for both the employees and the department 
heads. 

In April 2009, long time member Debra Friedlander resigned her position on the Personnel Board. 
Ms. Friedlander was a valuable asset to the Board and will be sorely missed. We wish Debra all the best 
in her future endeavors. 

The Personnel Board met on April 27^^ prior to the Annual Town Meeting and in accordance with 
Article XV. The Board approved a 2.5% wage increase to the Salary Classification Plan for Grade M and 
Grade H employees who fall under the Personnel Policy Governing Compensation and Employment 
Benefits to be fonwarded to Town Meeting for its approval. This wage increase was in line with the 
collective bargaining agreements. No other changes to the Policy were made. 

As the Personnel Manager, I would like to express my appreciation to the members of the 
Personnel Board, the Town Administrator, Andrew Maylor, Administrative Assistant, Maureen Shultz and 
the Department Heads for their continued support. 



Sincerely, 

Nancy A. Lord 

Nancy Lord 
Personnel Manager 



220 



SWAMPSCOTT POLICE DEPARTMENT 



Fiscal Year 2009 
Mission Statement 

The Swampscott Police Department is a community-oriented police department, committed to 
providing professional sen/ice to all with fairness, compassion and respect, regardless of religion, age, 
race, color, creed, nationality or lifestyle. Working in concert with the community we endeavor to prevent 
crime, protect life and property and preserve the peace, order and safety in Swampscott. We nurture 
public trust by holding ourselves to the highest standards of performance and ethics. 

Throughout the year members of the Swampscott Police Department worked to prevent crime 
and disorder and to protect life and property by presenting a visible police presence throughout the Town 
and by responding rapidly and professionally when called upon. 

Marijuana Law Change 

Effective January 1, 2009, the law changed with respect to the possession small amounts of 
marijuana., For possession of less than one ounce of marijuana a civil citation with a fine is issued rather 
than criminal prosecution. Twelve (12) citations were issued from Jan to June 30"^ 2009. 

New Equipment 

We purchased two new lap top mobile data computers (MDTs). MDT computers allow officers in the field 
to obtain data relative to motor vehicles, drivers and warrants and records of persons encountered on 
patrol. We configured the windows messaging service on the laptops and dispatch computers to allow the 
cars to talk to each other and the station without using the radio. 

Grant funds were used to purchase a new radar unit. We deployed 4 portable breath testers 
(PBTs) for use in the field and trained officers in their use. 

We installed a new computer network server. 

Seizures and Asset Forfeitures 

$2,028 cash assets were forfeited to the Department, seized from a drug investigation 

By Law changes 

A false alarm bylaw was enacted by Town Meeting at the request of the police department. The 
bylaw allows for the imposition of service fees for each alarm in excess of three in the course of a year. A 
related bylaw was also passed by Town Meeting which allows the police department to enforce certain 
bylaws through a non criminal citation process. 

The Police Department sponsored a bylaw, which prohibits smoking marijuana in a public place 
which was passed by Town Meeting. Violation of this bylaw is punishable by a fine and offenders are 
required to identify themselves. 

No Place for Hate 

Representatives of the Police Department served on the Respect for Human Differences Task 
Force, which worked to promote tolerance in Swampscott and maintain the Town's status as a No Place 
for Hate Community. Officers participated in the planning and support of the annual Walk for Respect for 
Human Differences. 

Park and Walk Patrols 

Officers were required to conduct Park and Walk patrols during their shift to increase accessibility 
and visibility of the Police. Patrols were generally conducted in areas where and increased police 
presence might be expected to impact a particular problem, reduce the opportunity for crime or generally 
enhance safety. 



221 



Shannon Gang Grant 

The Swampscott Police collaborated with other police departments to form the Southern Essex 
Coalition in order to look at regional issues pertaining to youth crinrie and gangs. Together we received a 
grant that funded the formation of a regional gang unit comprised of officers from each of the represented 
communities. Assigned officers conducted regular initiatives in each community designed to gather 
intelligence and target gang activity. Representatives from each community met on a regular basis to 
share information and experiences. Funds from this grant were used to train Swampscott officers on 
alcohol enforcement issues. 

E911 Grants 

We received two E911 grants. E911 grants are funded through a surcharge on telephone and cell 
phone service. A training grant for $5,000 was used to train several officers in incident command. A 
second grant of $23,000 was utilized primarily to offset communications staffing overtime. 

Email Notification Program 

We continued an email notification program In which Detective Ted Delano regularly sent emails 
to participating residents to inform them about safety issues and crime trends in the hope of reducing the 
opportunities for residents to become victims of crime through awareness. 

Community Policing 

The Swampscott Police Department has adopted as a philosophy the principles of Community 
Policing. Community Policing redefines the police mission to focus on solving problems rather than simply 
responding to calls for service. It requires that in addition to responding to individual incidents, we 
examine series of calls to determine if a problem exists. The Police Department has worked to achieve 
relationships with a variety of public agencies, community organizations and citizens to allow us to work 
together to develop strategies to solve many of the problems that affect the safety and quality of life in 
Swampscott. The objective of Community Policing is to increase the ability of the citizens of Swampscott 
to reduce the opportunities for crime and disorder to occur in our community. 

In Fiscal Year 09 the Police Department conducted a variety of community programs supported 
by a $35,000 grant from the Massachusetts Executive Office of Public Safety. During the period covered 
by this report Community Policing funds were used for programs involving the Bike Patrol Unit, the School 
Resource Officer and the Traffic Unit. Officers were able to participate in many youth events, providing 
opportunities for officers and the children in Town to interact in positive ways. The Police Department and 
the Fire Department hosted a Public Safety Day event, which was well attended by the public. 

Forty Swampscott students went to the District Attorney's summer camp sponsored by the Police 
Department. The camp was attended by about three hundred students from area communities and is 
coordinated by the Essex County District Attorneys Office. 



Elder Outreach 

In Swampscott there is a growing population of elders who desire to live independently but often 
fail to take advantage of available assistance. We recognize that the Police are uniquely positioned to 
identify people in need in the community and that it is vital that we refer those people to community 
resources. 

In FY09 Sergeant John Behen and Officer Sal Caruso were assigned to work with the 
Swampscott Council on Aging. Together elders who have contact with the Police and find themselves in 
need of certain types of assistance will not feel alone in trying to solve their problems. These officers also 
conducted several safety and fraud education programs for elders at the Senior Center during the year in 
cooperation with the Swampscott Council on Aging. Officers met monthly with representatives of the 
Counsel on Aging, The Essex County Sheriffs Department, Greater Lynn Senior Services (GLSS) and 
the community to identify the needs of elders. 

Care Call Program 

In FY09 the police department continued to partner with the Nahant Police Department to provide 
the services of an automated system where elders who are living alone are checked on daily by the 
police. The CARE CALL system replaced the "Are You OK" system in March of 2009. Located in Nahant 



222 



Police station, the system automatically dials the home telephones of enrolled Swampscott residents at a 
predetermined time every day. If the resident fails to answer the phone a Swampscott Police Officer is 
dispatched to the home to check on their well being. In FY 09 officers responded to 38 checks, 46 Assist 
the Elderly calls and 93 Well Being Checks. 

School Resource Officer 

The Swampscott Police Department in collaboration with the school community is committed to 
ensuring that all students receive an education in a safe environment free from harassment or threat of 
crime. 

Detective Rose Cheever as the full time School Resource Officer worked to maintain a positive 
relationship between the police and the school community. Her presence acts as a deterrent to crime and 
provides added security and safety for the school's students, faculty, and visitors. 

The School Resource Officer investigated criminal activity that occurred in or around all school 
properties and followed up on cases involving students that occurred outside of school as well, since 
many incidents carry over into the school setting. The Officer addressed issues such as aggressive 
bullying behavior by students and worked to promote teen conflict resolution. 

The School Officer worked closely with the Lynn Juvenile Probation Department to monitor 
juveniles on probation sharing information and conducting curfew checks. 

In FY09 Detective Cheever conducted defense training for all girls from 9"^ grade to and 
presented a similar program during Step Up Day with 8'" graders. She participated in career day at the 
Middle school. 

As part of a program "Operation Save a Teen" police partnered with the Alcoholic Beverage 
Control Commission (ABCC) to send a strong message during prom season to deter underage drinking of 
alcohol. This program included the presence of police and inspectors from the ABCC on prom night with 
portable breath testers used for screening prom participants to encourage a safe prom environment and 
prevent impaired driving post prom. 

As S.A.D.D. class advisor she worked with students to organize a campaign to promote seat belt 
use. The Swampscott S.A.D.D group received the "Belt It Out" media award from the Governors Highway 
Safety Bureau for their campaign. S.A.D.D also received a mini grant for $600 to fund for posters and 
educational materials and a iDanner. 

Detective Cheever worked with the students to produce and record a dramatization of a drunk 
driving accident or "MOCK OUI." All students attended this dramatic and thought provoking presentation. 

Funding for this position was subsidized by the School Department in recognition that the safety 
and security of the school environment is paramount. 

Oversight of liquor establishments 

Inspections were done of liquor establishments in Town and all were found to be In compliance 
with the conditions of their licenses. An alcohol sting was conducted in collaboration with the Alcoholic 
Beverage Control Commission (ABCC.) Two (2) businesses were cited for serving or selling liquor to an 
underage youth. 

The Police Department hosted training for all liquor license holders who conduct business in 
Swampscott. The goal of the training was to inform license holders of their responsibilities with respect to 
their liquor license. The training included guidance on the safe sale of alcoholic beverages, preventing the 
sale to intoxicated patrons, detecting fake identification, compliance operations and sales to minors. 

New Policies and Procedures and training 

We implemented a policy and procedure that deals with incidents of domestic violence involving 
police officers. Prior to disseminating this policy we held a domestic violence training class for all of our 
police officers with representatives of the District Attorney's Office. 

We implemented a policy and procedure for our "response to underage drinking" in order to 
effectively and consistently deal with this persistent issue. With grant funds and in collaboration with 
the Essex County District Attorneys Office we held a class for all officers on the policy and provided 
training on the legal issues involved when, for example, entering a residence when an underage party is 
taking place or prosecuting cases where possession must be demonstrated. 



223 



Traffic Division 

The Traffic Division worked with the community to identify and address needs and problems 
concerning vehicle traffic and parking. Persistent traffic related issues were forwarded to Lieutenant 
Thomas Stephens and Lieutenant Gary Lord. 

The Traffic Officer's duties included overseeing the winter parking permitting and enforcement 
program as well as planning for matters that impact traffic such as road construction projects and special 
events like road races. 

The Governors Highway Safety Commission funded four separate enforcement Initiatives for the 
Department. These consisted of two" Click it or Ticket" and two O.U.I, enforcement efforts. We also 
received grant funds to conduct a series of pedestrian enforcements where officers in civilian clothing 
were used to walk in crosswalks together with a marked patrol officer unit to detect violators. The grant 
also funded the purchase of a new radar unit and pedestrian signage. 

Detective Division 

The Detective Division was comprised of Detective Sergeant Timothy Cassidy and Detectives 
Ted Delano, Jim Schultz and Rose Cheever. 

Detectives ensured that all officers receive the latest crime and officer safety information as well 
as regular updates of court decisions so that officers have the latest case law and law changes. 

Many crimes that occur in Swampscott involve multiple jurisdictions and require that Detectives 
maintain a relationship with Federal, State and other local law enforcement agencies. The Detectives 
were responsible for initiating or following up on investigations that ranged from annoying telephone calls, 
identity theft and credit card offences to, drug dealing, threats, serious assaults, sex offences, burglaries, 
and robberies. Detectives conducted several undercover drug investigations along with area police 
departments, the D.E.A. and the Essex County and North Shore Drug task force. Officers worked on a 
number of serious crimes including a kidnapping where suspects severely beat and robbed a man and 
shot at him as he escaped his abductors and two domestic stabbings. 



Family Services Officer 

Detective Delano was assigned as the Family Services Officer. He reviewed 148 reported 
incidents of domestic disputes and monitored active restraining orders involving individuals in 
Swampscott. He maintained contact with victims, followed the progress of domestic court cases and 
ensured that the members of the Police Department were informed of situations where victims may be at 
particular risk. 

IVlotorcvcle Unit 

The Department's Motorcycle unit includes Lieutenant Paul Bartram as the officer in charge, with 
Officers Michael Bowden, Sal Caruso and Brian Wilson as riders on two police Harley Davidson 
motorcycles. 

Individual Officer Recognition and Awards 

Sergeant William Waters and Officer Candace Doyle were awarded lifesaving commendations for 
resuscitating an unconscious man who was not breathing due to an airway obstruction. 

Sergeant Jonathan Locke, Officer Thomas Hennessey and Officer Michael Frayler and Officer 
Michael Frayler Detective Ted Delano, Detective Jim Schultz, were commended for their actions in 
response to a man who had attacked and repeatedly stabbed a woman, critically wounding her before 
turning the knife on himself. 

Detective Sergeant Timothy Cassidy and Detective Jim Schultz were commended for their work 
to apprehend the individuals responsible for a kidnapping, and armed robbery. 

Detective Ted Delano received the Lynn Area Chamber of Commerce Town Pride Award. 

Emergency Medical Training 

During this period training was provided to officers in CPR, First Responder and AED (Automated 
External Defibrillator). Medical training allowed officers to maintain their mandated certification in each of 
these categories. As our Medical Officer, Lieutenant Jeanne Butler organized or conducted much of the 
training and serves as liaison to the local ambulance service provider and is our state mandated 



224 



Designated Infection Control Officer. She Is also a member of the Metro Boston Critical Incident Stress 
Management team. 



Firearms and Use of Force Training 

Officers are equipped and trained with weapons that provide them with an array of options with 
respect to use of force. Under the direction of firearms instructors Officer John Dube and Detective Jim 
Schultz, officers attended two days of firearms and less lethal weapons training. Officers reviewed the 
Department Use of Force Policy as part of their training. 

In-Service Training 

Annual in-service training was conducted for the Department's officers at the Reading Police 
Academy. Department conducted additional training "in house". Officers were recertified in the use of the 
Intoxilizer breath alcohol analyzer unit. 

Online training courses 

We subscribed to an online training program for police officer which allowed officers to sign on 
and take certain courses and test on the subject during their shift. Records of the officer's participation 
and testing scores were recorded and maintained by the Captain. 

Department Statistics- FY 2009 

Some of the offenses reported during this period included: 

4 Robberies 

50 House or building breaking & entering 
101 Vehicle break-ins 
15 Motor vehicles stolen. 

9 Stolen vehicles recovered or abandoned in Town 
201 larceny related offences 
148 Domestic dispute incidents 

3 Reported rapes 
2 Indecent assault and batteries 
37 Drug offences 

48 Assaults and assault & batteries 
32 Incidents of identity theft 

4 Attempted murder 

The Police Department responded to 428 motor vehicle accidents 

Officers made 224 arrests in FY09. There were an additional 286 criminal complaints filed in which 
persons were summonsed to appear in court before a judge or at a hearing with a Clerk Magistrate. 11 
arrest warrants were sought. Summonsing is most often done as an alternative to arrest or as a result of 
a follow-up investigation. Arrest warrants are most often sought when there are facts that lead officers to 
believe the suspect will flee or cannot be immediately located. 

2.256 traffic charges were cited. Violations included: 

602 Speeding offenses 

220 Drivers license offences. 

281 Vehicle registration offences 

768 Red light and stop sign offences 

40 Incidents of operating negligently or to endanger. 

26 Operating under the influence of liquor 

1 Operating under the influence of drugs. 

Officers issued 2.462 parking tickets with a total fine amount of $64.255 



225 



664 


All night parking 


889 


Restricted place 


143 


Overtime parking 


26 


Wheels over 1 2 inches from curb 


225 


Wrong direction parking 


199 


Parking on sidewalk 


19 


Within 10 feet of hydrant 


33 


Obstructing a driveway 


16 


Within 20 feet of an intersection 


39 


Parking on a crosswalk 


67 


Fire lane 


8 


Blocking private way/fire apparatus 


61 


Impeding snow removal 


43 


Handicapped parking 


79 


Other /Unknown offense 



Incident Type 


Total 




Incident Type 


Total 


Assist the elderly 


46 




Open and Gross Lewdness 


1 


Are you OK check 


oo 
OO 




Parking Complaint 




Attempted B&E 


2 




Power Failure 


10 


Accident under JtlOOO 


■170 

17o 




Protective Custody 


D 


Accident Over !J)1 uou 






yi 1 Hang up 




Accident with personal injury 






Recovered Property 


lb 


Accident Hit & Run M V 


70 




n AAA* iai^aJ a I a aA V / aL«!aIa 

Recovered Stolen Vehicle 


9 


Accident Hit & Run MV w/injury 


1 




Rape 


3 


Accidents/Pedestrian 


12 




Robbery 


4 


Alarm 


luyy 




oioien License riaie 


1 


Annoying Phone Calls 


40 




Stolen Motor Vehicle 


15 


Assist Fire Department 


14 




Serving 209-A Restraining Order 


15 


Assault 


18 




Service Call 


314 


Assault & Battery 


40 




Serve Court Papers 


150 


Assist other Police Depts. 


95 




Shoplifting 


58 


Break & Entering 


50 




Sudden Death 


8 


B&E Motor Vehicle 


101 




Suicide/ Attempt 


3 


Building Check 


4,230 




Suspicious Motor Vehicle 


152 


Bomb Threat 


1 




Suspicious Activity 


468 


Civil Matter 


34 




Threats 


39 


Complaint 


263 




Towed Motor Vehicle 


15 


Disturbance 


167 




Tree Limb Down 


46 


Domestic Dispute 


133 




Traffic Control/investigation 


56 


DPW Notification 


64 




Trespassing 


13 


Drug Offense 


37 




Truants 


15 


Erratic Operation 


85 




Vandalism 


140 


Fire Alarm 


42 




Violating 209A 


12 


Forgery 


2 




Warrant Arrest 


59 


Found Property 


70 




Wire Down 


24 



226 



Fireworks Complaint 


32 




Youth Loitering 


38 


Fire 


54 




Noisy Group Inside 


2 


Hate Crime/incident 


2 




Noisy Group Outside 


29 


Hazardous Conditions 


190 




Skate board/Rollerblade 


11 


Indecent Assault & Battery 


2 




Youth Drinking Indoors 


5 


Identity Theft 


32 




Youth Drinking Outdoors 


7 


Larceny 


143 




Youth Disturbance 


39 


Liquor Offense 


4 




Youth Trespassing 


12 


Lockout 


39 




Youth Vandalism/Graffiti 


4 


Lost Property 


56 




Motor Vehicle fatality 





Loud Music/Party 


92 




Well Being Checks 


93 


Medical Aid 


780 




Child Abuse 


4 


Missing Person 


17 




Neighbor Dispute 


22 


Disabled Motor Vehicle 


56 




Park an Walk 


985 


Motor Vehicle Stop 


2,369 




Field Interview 


57 


Refuse to stop for police officer 


3 




OUi Liquor 


20 


Notification 


56 




OUI Drugs 


1 


Open Door/Window 


73 




Alcohol Overdose 


1 


Missing Juvenile 


10 




Receiving Stolen Property 


4 


Blasting Complaint 


2 




Drug Overdose 


8 


Loose/Stray Dog 


50 




Firearms Violation 


1 


Animal Complaint 


226 




Dangerous Weapon 


3 


Disabled MA/ 


73 




Kidnapping 


1 


Traffic post assignment 


29 




Parking Enforcement 


92 


By Law violation 


4 




Selective Enforcement 


7 








Attempted Murder 


4 






















Total Log Entries FY 08 Entries (Not 
all are listed) 


14,799 

























Registered Sex Offenders 

At this writing there are two registered Level 2 Sex Offenders that live in Swampscott. There are also four 
registered Level 2 Sex Offenders that work in Swampscott. There are no registered Level 3 Sex 
Offenders either living or working in Swampscott 



A Level 3 classification represents the most serious of offenders. Level 3 offender's photographs are 
posted in several public places including the Police Station, the Library and Town Hall. 

Internal Affairs 

Captain John Alex is assigned as the Department's Internal Affairs officer. The primary responsibility of 
the Internal Affairs function is to respond to allegations of misconduct against the police department and 
its employees. Captain Alex is responsible for recording, registering, and controlling the investigation of 
complaints against employees. Additionally the Police Department continuously inspects and reviews 
officer conduct internally. 



227 



A relationship of trust and confidence between the employees of this police department and the citizens 
of the community is essential to the successful accomplishment of law enforcement objectives. We are 
committed to investigate all complaints against the department or a member of the department, 
regardless of the source of such complaints, through a regulated, fair, and impartial Internal Affairs 
Program. 

Citizens are encouraged to file a standard complaint report form, which is used to record all complaints of 
misconduct, mistreatment, or unethical practices against the police department. However, a verbal 
complaint may be lodged as well. Citizens may make complaints in person at the station or by telephone 
or mail. All complaints will be investigated promptly. 

In some cases a complaint can be resolved to the complainant's satisfaction at the time by the shift 
supervisor or officer-in-charge of the station. Immediate resolution can often be accomplished if the 
incident is clearly not of a serious nature, or arises from a misunderstanding or lack of knowledge of the 
law or of the limitation of a police officer's authority 

Any Internal Affairs investigation must be commenced Immediately upon receipt of the complaint and 
must be completed within thirty (30) days. 

Every person who has filed a complaint against an employee shall be notified of the results of the 
investigation. 

In fiscal year 2009 there were three (3) civilian complaints filed. All were investigated. Two involved 
complaints of officer rudeness stemming from traffic stops. One of those was determined to be 
unfounded. A second verbal complaint was unsubstantiated when the complainant failed to follow 
through. A third complaint alleged rudeness by an officer during an off duty incident and was 
substantiated. The officer was disciplined. 

Personnel Changes 

Officer Kevin Reen was appointed as a Regular Officer 
Officer Fred Brown retired from the Police Department 

Due to budget constraints the vacancy created by the retirement of Officer Brown was not filled resulting 
in a reassignment of a detective to the uniformed patrol division to fill the vacancy. 



Respectfully Submitted, 
Ronald J. Madigan 
Chief of Police 



228 



PLANNING BOARD REPORT 

The Planning Board held twelve nrjeetings during the year from July 1, 2008 through June 30, 
2009 to review and to provide approval action on various plans submitted to it under the Massachusetts 
Subdivision Control Law, and on site plans submitted to it in accordance with Swampscott Town By- 
Laws. Discussions were held with Swampscott residents, developers, contractors, architects and 
engineers regarding these matters to provide guidance and to assure compliance with Town By-Laws 
and regulations. The Planning Board also routinely consults with other town departments and officials, 
including the Inspector of Buildings, the Department of Public Works, the Fire Department and the Police 
Department, to ensure that proposed developments will ensure the safety and well being of Swampscott 
residents. 

This was the first full year that the new amended Zoning By-Law was in affect which was 
approved by Town Meeting Members in May 2009. In addition to other business which came before the 
Planning Board during the twelve meetings over the course of the year, the Board reviewed 11 
commercial submissions for signage and site plan, 14 residential site plan submissions, 1 site plan 
review for a proposed daycare, a subdivision review, a site plan review for a new proposed condominium 
development, and a paper street petition. 

Also during this year, long time Planning Board member Jeffery Blonder resigned in October 
as he was called for active duty as a member of the National Guard. Angela Ippolito was appointed 2 
months later as Mr. Blonder's replacement and later was elected as a Planning Board member in April 
2009. In addition to the changes in personal of the Planning Board, the Town of Swampscott also lost its 
Town Planner, Danielle McKnight who resigned to take a position in Salem. Unfortunately the Town of 
Swampscott did seek to replace the position, something that was an unfortunate and the Planning Board 
feels that not filling the position is a huge loss for the Town. 

The Planning Board wishes to express its appreciation to other town boards and officials for 
their cooperation in helping to promote the town's interests and welfare. 

Respectfully submitted: 

Eugene Barden, Chairman 
John Phelan, Vice-Chairman 
Patrick Jones, Clerk 
Jeffery Blonder 
Bruce Paradise 
Angela Ippolito 



229 



SWAMPSCOTT PUBLIC LIBRARY 
FY09 



The Swampscott Public Library is an extremely busy institution. Historically library usage 
increases drastically when the economy is in a downward spiral. This fact is clearly evident this 
year. The needs of the townspeople have changed due to the economic downturn. We have many 
patrons in need of computers for job searching, classes for employment help and free 
entertainment for families. Many residents found that the library could answer many of their needs. 

We were forced to reduce our hours of operation to 44 hours per week. We attempted to 
spread our hours of operation among mornings, afternoons, evenings and weekends as much as 
possible. We are available at least a few hours each day with the exception of Sunday to the 
townspeople. It is difficult to meet the needs of everyone, but after a survey of our patrons needs, 
we have tried to provide them with those hours which they deem the most important. 

We are very fortunate at the library to be staffed by well schooled and highly professional 
individuals. We have six IVILS librarians on staff and three employees who have master's degrees 
in other areas. Six of the rest of our staff have a bachelor's degree. These qualified people are 
available all through the day to aid those patrons who enter the building. 

The library houses over 104,000 items, which are available for patrons' usage. We have 
1 6 public usage computers and we offer free WIF! to those citizens who bring in their own laptops. 
We provide information at the library and over the Internet through our library website and through 
our various on line database offerings. 

The library was a very busy place and even with reduced hours we still service just under 
the 70,000 people who came into the library. We checked out over 160,000 items and increased 
our holdings. 

We received grants to help us defray the cost of some programs and our collection, one 
from the NMRLS (Northeast Library System), one from the Arts Council, and one from the 
Unitarian Universalist Church of Greater Lynn. 

Programming at the library continued in full force. The Children's Room librarians offered 
story times, school classes and holiday programs throughout the entire year. The summer 
programming was filled with puppets, animals, performers and storytelling. We held a major family 
night with help from a grant from the Unitarian Universalist Church of Greater Lynn.. We had over 
100 people attend this fun evening. The Young Adult librarian continued to offer programs, visit 
the middle school and the high school and celebrate Teen Read Week. Our adult programming 
continued with programs on financing college tuition, tax help for seniors and career programs for 
new graduates and the newly unemployed. The monthly gathering of Swampscott historians 
continued at the library under the supervision of Lou Gallo. 

The Chorover author series presented Ann Hood, Jennifer Haigh, Hallie Ephron, Anne 
LeClaire, Andres Dubus, Tom Perrotta, Tess Gerritsen and several local authors at our First 
Annual Local Author's Festival.. Our popular title book group, as well as our mystery books 
group, continued to meet at the library. There was an ongoing movie discussion group, an 
independent writing group and our volunteer knitting group all meeting at the library. We once 
again celebrated National Poetry Week with the Lee Golomb Cadiff Teen Poetry contest, and the 
annual open mike meeting of the Tin Box poets. 

The Trustees of the Swampscott Library continued to meet monthly to oversee policies 
and projects. They helped to oversee the carpeting of the adult area and the selection of new 
lighting for the reference area. Our long time Trustee,Carl Reardon passed away during this year. 

The Friends of the Swampscott Public Library continue to support library activities. They 
meet monthly to determine the needs of the library and the manner in which they can best help the 
librarians to provide services to our community. They provide a newsletter, children's 
programming, and museum passes. This year the passes include The Children's Museum, The 
Science Museum, the Peabody/ Essex Museum, the Isabella Steward Garner Museum, the John 
F. Kennedy Library, Zoo New England, the House of Seven Gables, the Lynn Museum, the 
Museum of Fine Arts, the Sports Museum and the ICA. These passes are in constant demand by 
our patrons. 



230 



BOARD OF LIBRARY TRUSTEES 
Joanne vanderBurg, Chair 
Jonathan Penyack, Vice Chair John Karwowski, Secretary. 

LIBRARY STAFF 
FULL TIME 
Alyce Deveau, Director 
Susan Conner, Assistant Director 
Sandra Moltz, Reference Librarian Maureen McCarthy, Head of Circulation 

PART TIME 

Elizabeth Coughlin, Children's Librarian Israella Abrams, Children's Librarian 

Marcia Harrison, Cataloguer Ann Nechtem, Library Assistant 

Barbara Wernnuth, Tech Aide Penny Longhurst, Library Assistant 

Yelena Kuzmina, Tech Aide Dorothy Forman, Administrative Assistant 

Joanne Janakas, Library Aide Marie Epstein, Library Aide 

Maralyn Keay, Library Aide Cynthia Zeman, Library Aide 



OFFICERS OF THE FRIENDS OF THE SWAMPSCOTT LIBRARY 

Ellen Winkler. President Sidney Epstein, Treasurer 

Vacant -Vice President Jonathan Penyack, Clerk 

Alison Kenney, AssL Clerk Barbara Wermuth, Asst. Treasurer 



Respectfully submitted, 
Alyce Deveau, Director 



231 



SWAMPSCOTT PUBLIC SCHOOLS 



Matthew H. Malone, Ph.D., Superintendent of Schools 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



David P. Whelan, Jr., Chair 
Neil Bernstein, Ph.D. 
Joseph Crimmins 

Glenn Paster 
Maureen Thomsen 



SCHOOL PRINCIPALS 



High School 
Middle School 
Clarke School 
Hadley School 
Stanley School 



Lawrence Murphy 
Ralph Watson 
Lois Longin 
Sandra Rivers 
Pamela Angelakis 



781 596-8830 
781 596-8820 
781 596-8812 
781 596-8847 
781 596-8837 



High School - Lawrence Murphy resigned and Brian Salzer was hired in June 2009 as High School 
Principal. 

Superintendent - Matthew Malone resigned effective July 31 , 2009. Maureen Bingham, Ed.D., Executive 
Director of Student Support Services, was named Interim Superintendent effective September 2009. 
April 2009 - Jacqueline Kinney voted in as a member of School Committee. David Whelan did not run for 
re-election. 

CLARKE SCHOOL 

Enrollment: 218 



ESP Reassignments: April Cochran - Primary Learning Center to Middle School 
School Theme 

Over the past school year, the Clarke School staff continued with its process of melding together 
what were once four school communities into one cohesive and unified entity. While this work continued 
to be challenging, the Clarke School faculty is deeply invested in helping our students reach their highest 
potential, become outstanding citizens, and give back to our community in a positive manner. 

We met monthly as an all-school community and we modeled our meetings after the Responsive 
Classroom. We started with each class greeting one another followed by each grade level showcasing 
their work. We concluded the meeting with a community building activity. 

Daily we had school-wide announcements where as a community we shared in each other's 
birthdays, special events, recited the Pledge of Allegiance, and in unison we remembered our school 
motto of the D (determination) O (organization) R (responsibility) Y (you make a difference) by chanting 
"All hands on board DORY Nation! 
Student Programs and Activities 

Kindergarten Screening, Monthly Reading and Problem Solving, Curriculum Night, Book Fair, 
Bring Your Parents Back to School Night, Walking Club (recess), Fall and Spring student pictures, 
Halloween Hoot, All-School Halloween Parade, Thanksgiving Food Drive, Nationwide Election activities. 
Library Book Sale, Spelling Bee, Geography Bee, Chorus Gr. 3 & 4, Monthly Community meetings 



Staffing: 



Reassignments: 



Paula Anderson - Grade 4 to Grade 3 

Janet Frasca - Library/Media Specialist to Grade 4 

Katherine Jordanoff- Grade 4 tO Grade 3 

Mary Powers - Grade 3 to Grade 5 at Middle School 



232 



showcasing student work, 100'^ Day Celebration, grade appropriate field trips to Lowell Mills, Museum of 
Science, Aquarium, Butterfly Place, Make Way for Ducklings, walking tours of town offices. Stranger 
Safety-Swampscott Police, All School Field Day, Chorus visit to Senior Center, Internet Safety Gr. 3 & 4, 
Science Fair, Gr. 4 Middle School Orientation, Kindergarten Visitation, Jump-a-Thon for Tolerance, Visits 
to Swampscott Public Library, Keyboarding Classes Gr. 3 & 4, School Walking Days, Pizza/Movie Nights, 
Grade 4 Moving Up, Cradles to Crayon, Schoolwide Field Trip-Theatreworks, Meteorologist visit-Barry 
Burbank, Mock "Lock Down" drill, Volunteer Appreciation Breakfast. Poetry Night, Talent Show, K&4 
Learning Buddies, Outdoor/Community Lunches, Boston Ballet visit-Grade 3 
Grade 4 Leaders Club 

Numerous jobs around school - cafeteria, door holders, outdoor clean-up and recycling, 
Fundraising for TLC, Learning Buddies, Game Day, Food drive for local shelters. Drive for Animal Shelter, 
Crazy Style Day, Spring clean-up, Fourth Grade Talent Show, Extra Recess Day, Teacher Appreciation 
Day, Pajama and Hot Chocolate Day, Teacher/Student Switch Day. 
PTA Activities 

Halloween Hoot, gift wrap, Book Fair, Holiday Fair, After School Program-basketball, book clubs, 
art, etc., Community Day, Cow Plop, Box Tops, Teacher Wish List, Pizza/Movie Night, Teacher 
Appreciation Luncheon, School-wide field trips - Theatreworks. 
Cultural Arts 

Historical Perspectives - Ben Franklin and Abe Lincoln, Native American-Dan Cripps, Art Quest - 
grades 1, 3 and 4, Shared Science-Owl pellets, Heart Beats, Eyes and Vision, Artist in Residence-Julia 
Thacker, Poetry Night, Domino Guy. 

HADLEY SCHOOL 

In September 2008, the Hadley School opened with two hundred and fifty-one students and 
ended the school year with two hundred and forty-four students. The classroom configurations consisted 
of three kindergartens, two first grades, three second grades and two fourth grades. 
Staffing: 

New Hires: Karen Gargan SPL mid-year reassignment from Middle School 

Retirement: Jennifer Palardy Grade 4 teacher 6/24/09 

LOA: Meredith Bailey Grade 3 teacher 9/3/08-11/08/08 

Eleanor Hounsell Grade 4 teacher 1 1/03/08-3/20/09 

Lynda Polino SPL 2/9/09-6/24/09 

Christine Dzedulionis Inclusion Specialist 2/23/09-6/24/09 

School Theme 

Learning by the Sea is the theme at Hadley School. Some grades use our natural resource and 
ideal location at different times of the year to explore and utilize the wonders of the Atlantic Ocean and 
the seaside habitat. 
Faculty Charity 

When a staff member chooses to wear jeans to work, we have agreed to pay $1 .00. This pool of 
money is one source for our staff to make charitable contributions. This year the faculty donated to the 
Senior Center at holiday time, HAWC, and donations in memory of staffs relatives. 
Peer Proof - Grade 4 

Funded by the Respect for Human Differences Committee and the PTA, our fourth graders 
participated in a six-week program facilitated by the Camp Fire Girl program that focused on self-esteem, 
peer pressure, positive friendships, and conflict resolutions. 
Continental Math League - Grades 2-4 

This is an extracurricular activity manned by parent volunteers who act as coaches to encourage 
students to problem solve in mathematics. The league meets one morning a week from 7:45 a.m. to 8:15 
a.m. 

Hadley Herald 

This is an extracurricular activity to create a school newspaper with parent volunteers as 
facilitators and editors. 



233 



Leaders' Club 

This activity was opened to all 4"^ grade students as an opportunity to enhance school culture, 
develop leadership qualities, and contribute to charitable endeavors. Spirit Day themes - Pajama Day, 
Crazy Hair Day, Hat Day, Red Sox Day, TLC-Toys for Local Children. 
Conversation and Cookies 

The principal and school adjustment counselor conducted weekly small group lunches (four at a 
time on a rotating basis) giving students a forum to discuss issues of importance to them. 
School Rallies 

In order to encourage good conduct and respectful behavior, students were recognized at 
monthly school rallies. 
Science Lunch Bunch 

Parent volunteers created and stocked a Science Room. They conducted grade level science 
activities with small groups of students during lunch and recess time slots. 
Student Activities/Programs 

Curriculum Night, Open House and Book Fair, Grade 4 Bullying Program, Fall and Spring 
Pictures, Halloween Parade, Spelling Bees in grade 4 and grade 1, METCO Potluck, Kindergarten 
Dinosaur Program, Reading Buddies, Field Trips to Smolak Farms, Aquarium, North Shore Music 
Theater, State House, Fisherman's Beach, Humphrey House, Lowell Mills, Boston Symphony, Harvard 
Peabody Museum, Music Department concerts - chorus and band, D.E.A.R. (Drop Everything and 
Read), Wellness Day, Jump-in-Tolerance Jump-a-thon/Respect for Human Difference, RHD Walk-a-thon, 
Grade 4 Middle School Orientation, Grade 4 Field Day (all schools), Hadley Field Day, Memorial Day 
Program with invited guests. Kindergarten Tea, Classroom Performances, Intergeneratlonal interviews. 
Title I Parent Night, 4 Grade chorus performance at JCC, Daddy Drop-Off Day. Trips to the Public 
Library. 

PTA Sponsored Programs/Activities/Charitable Endeavors 

Len Cabral-storyteller, Historical Perspectives, Historical New England, Martha Dana-the Puppet 
Lady, Art Quest, Domino Physics, Dan Kripps - Native American Perspectives, After School 
Clubs/Activities, Holiday Fair, Spring Arts Festival, Supplies for Underprivileged Children, Support Our 
Troops, Green Team - gardening and recycling, Volunteer Breakfast, Salem Mission - food drive, 
Audubon Society Grade Level Programs, Poet-in Residence Julie Thacker, Science Room. 

STANLEY SCHOOL 

Stanley School opened on September 3, 2008 with 306 students enrolled in 16 classrooms in 
Grades K-4. Nine of those students were enrolled through the METCO program. One additional METCO 
student enrolled on 9/15/08 
Staffing: 

New Staff: Kelley Cash ESP transferred from Preschool 9/2/08 

Stephanie Coplon Primary Lrng. Ctr. from Hadley 9/2/08 

Debra Dewing ESP 9/2/08 

Laurie Reis ESP from Hadley 9/2/08 

Alicia Rowe ESP from Hadley 9/2/08 

Holly Sheehan Gr. 4 Teacher 9/2/08 

Melissa York ESP from Hadley 9/2/08 

Retirement: None 

Leave of Absence: 

Dorina Helferich Maternity Leave 11/17/08-3/6/09 

School Theme 

Learning and Caring Count at Stanley continues to be our theme. Students continued to commit 
random acts of kindness and receive P.R.O. Awards (People Respecting Others). Many other organized 
community service activities were planned for student participation and fundraising. This year, 40 
students in Grades K-4 participated in the St. Jude Hospital Math-a-Thon and they raised $2,490.00. 
Each student completed a Math Fun Book, CD or completed their math problems online with grade level 
appropriate problems and collected pledges from sponsors. 

Grade 4 Leaders. They continue to be role models who demonstrate leadership and service 
while developing persona attributes. Leaders assume various responsibilities over the course of the year. 
Leaders ran a very successful Recycling Program. They pride themselves on collecting money for TLC, 



234 



meet weekly with the principal to work on developing leadership skills, responsible behavior and 
exemplify belief that Taking One Small Action Can Make a Difference. 

Leaders raised $748 plus several boxes of gifts were donated for TLC. Leaders raised $350 with 
their Open House Bake Sale to purchase gift certificates for the Swampscott Senior Center Holiday Party. 
They raised $200 for the American Red Cross during Wacky Hair Day. They also raised $220 on 
Pajama Day and the VFW matched this amount so with a total of $440 we purchased phone cards for the 
troops and mailed them overseas with cards made by the students. UNICEF Halloween Trick or Treat 
Collection was $642.76 
PROGRAMS: 

SPIRIT - Stanley Parents Inspire Reinforce Teach 

This program was started to organize parent volunteers for various activities. Volunteers can get 
involved in our school by either running before school programs, assisting in the library, assisting with 
clerical tasks in the office, etc. The SPIRIT squad has been an enhancement to our school community. 
Continental Math League - Grades 2-5 

Meets one morning a week from 7:45 a.m. - 8:15 a.m. with parent volunteers and teachers as 
coaches. 

Newspaper Club - Grades 2-5 

Meets one afternoon a week with parent volunteers as facilitators and editors of this club. 
Student Programs and Activities 

September Stride for Good Health Walk, Monthly Writing Samples to Principal - Gr. K-4, 
Curriculum Night, Fall and Spring Student Pictures, Mass. Walk to School Day, Open House and Book 
Fair, Thanksgiving Feast with Lifeskills, Grade 1 Thanksgiving Play, Safe Routes to School Bike Safety 
Training with Grade 4, Gr. 4 Peer Proof Program with Camp Fire, Black History Assembly with Mrs. Bush, 
Ms. Mailman and Mrs. Pacitto, Kindergarten Halloween Parade, Geography Bee, Spelling Bee, 100"^ Day 
Food Drive for Local Food Pantry by Grade 3, Dental Program for Gr. 2, Internet Safety Classes with 
D.A.'s Office for Gr. 3 & 4, Twin & Triplet Day, Book Swap, School Mock Lockdown Drill, Gr. 4 Mexican 
Celebration, Gr. 1 Portfolio Sharing for Parents, Gr. 4 Visits from Rose Cheever, Gr. 4 Puberty Videos, 
Grs. K-3 visit from Library-lzzy Abrams, Field Trips to Brooksby Farms, North Shore Music Theater, 
Jordan's IMAX Theater, Dunn Planetarium, Fisherman's Beach & Salem Orientation Center, Music 
Department concerts-chorus. Music Department Vertical Concert with Middle & High School, P.E. Fitness 
Programs (gr. 4 one mile run, September Stride, Trekking Tuesdays, Halloween Heart Walk, Turkey Trot, 
Tae Kwon Do, Fitness Walks and Gr. 4 Field Day), D.E.A.R. Day (Drop Everything and Read), Kite 
Program, Gr. 4 Red Sox Day, Earth Weeks (snack weighing). Safe Routes to School Pedestrian Safety 
Training with Gr. 2, Gr. 4 Cemetery Walk, Various Authors' Teas, Gr. 3 Historical Society, Gr. 4 Canadian 
Celebration, METCO Roller Skating, Gr. 3 Boston Ballet Program, Senior Center Pen Pals with Gr. 4, 
Jump-in-Tolerance Jump-a-Thon/Respect for Human Differences, Grade K & 4 Visiting Day, Grade 3 
Photography Exhibit, 4L Visit and chorus Pert'ormance with Lifeskills, Senior Center Pen Pal Luncheon 
with Grade 4, Math-n-Munchkin Math Team celebration. Principal for a Day (Alice Sullivan) Recognition 
Ceremony, Grade 4 Moving Up Ceremony. 
Grade Four Leaders' Club Activities 

Open House Greeters/Bake Sale, Highly successfully recycling program (paper and plastic), 
fundraising for TLC, fundraising for American Red Cross-Wacky Hair Day, fundraising for Troops 
Overseas - Pajama Day, Grade 5 Leaders place flags on veterans' graves for Memorial Day, volunteer 
appreciation Breakfast. 
PTA Activities 

Popsicles in the Park, Stanley Tides Night, Sara Ward Executive Function Speaker, highly 
successful After School Enrichment Programs, Book Fair, Holiday Fair, Pizza & Movie Nights, Poet-in- 
Residence-Julia Thacker, Evening of Poetry, Recycle Art Program, Teacher Appreciation Staff Luncheon, 
Bingo Night, Earth Day Walk to School, Fitness Walk, Mass Routes Walk to School Day, Annual Fun-n- 
Field Day, Safe Routes & Gr. 2 Pedestrian Training, Talent Show 
Cultural Arts/Enrichment Programs 

Perry Pomeroy- Art Quest- Art History and Appreciation Gr. 1-4, Jill Stover - author, Grade 1, 
Julie Hahnke-author - Grs. 3 & 4, Tai Kwon Do, Jazz in America-all grades. Discovery Museum-gr. 3, 
Dan Kripps - Native American Perspectives. 

MIDDLE SCHOOL 



235 



staffing 

New Staff: 



Mary Powers 
Catherine Wynne 
Brandon Lewis 
Francisca Forchue 
IVIee Young Choi 
Lisa Rapisarda 
Josephine Uminsl<i 
Megan Bonomolo 
Elizabeth Rogers 
Natalie Paine 
Monica Murphy 
Joseph Flournoy 



Moved from Clarke School to Grade 5 
Moved from Clarke School for Grade 5 
New Hire - Language Arts - Grade 6 
New Hire - World Languages - Grade 8 
New Hire - Mathematics - Grade 7 
Special Education - Grade 6 

Moved from Hadley School - Special Education - Grade 5 

Assistant Principal 

New Hire - Science 

New Hire - ComputerrTechnology 

Language Arts - Grade 8 

Mathematics - Grade 7 



Resignations 



The Swampscott Middle School opened for the 2008-2009 school year on September 3, 2008, for 
the second year in the Forest Avenue location. This year opened with the addition of the entire fifth grade 
relocated to the Middle School. A pilot program with 100 fifth grade students was successfully completed 
during the 2007-2008 school year. The addition of the complete fifth grade resulted in several room 
changes to accommodate the students and the addition of three fifth grade teachers moving to the Middle 
School. The set up of the fifth grade is two 2-teacher teams and one 3-teacher team. The program was 
created so that students in Grades 5 and 6 are located in the same wing of the building and students in 
Grades 7 and 8 are in other areas of the building. The fifth grade experienced a very successful first 
year and highlights included a two night trip to Ferry Beach Environmental Camp in Saco, Maine. 

In November, the Middle School celebrated its first Day of Respect. This day, planned by 
building teachers and administration included small group activities in homerooms where students viewed 
a short video dealing with stereotypes and prejudice. The entire school then moved to the gym for an 
outstanding presentation by Dr. Michael Fullen. It was a wonderful day and will become an annual event 
for the school. 

The Special Education Department has continued to improve its inclusion model of service 
delivery. Special Education teachers and content area teachers in math and language arts co-teach 
classes to give students support and an academically rich program while still supplying Special Education 
services. The benefits of this model have also helped other students who may struggle with academic 
work but are not eligible for Special Education services. 

The math department created a new process for the honors math placement in Grade 7 and 
Grade 8. A placement test was developed and administered to all students. This process began when 
we were seeing over 60% of our students in the honors program, many placed by parent overrides. The 
process includes a placement test, review of students' grades, MCAS scores and teacher 
recommendations. Parent overrides are no longer accepted. The process reduced the number of 
students in the honors program and the math department is finding that the students are more 
appropriately placed. 

Grade 7 Social Studies classes have started a Sister School relationship with the Siyabule 
Primary School in Langa, Capetown, South Africa. Students write letters to each other, sharing 
information about themselves and their lives. Our students conducted a fundraising activity, making 
bracelets out of beads from Beads for Life, a program that supports women in South Africa and raised 
funds for playground equipment for the South Africa school. Ms. Bonomolo was able to deliver the 
money to the school on a summer trip to the area. In June, the US consulate sponsored a teleconference 
with our students and the students from Siyabule. Salem State College worked to supply the auditorium 
to host the conference. Our students were able to speak directly to the students they were writing. It was 
an amazing experience for all. 

Our Grade 8 students experienced a life changing time for many of them on our Grade 8 trip to 
Washington, D.C. Our students were in the Holocaust Museum when a shooting took place that resulted 
in a security guard being killed. Some students were present in the lobby and witnessed the shooting. 
The Middle School staff that chaperoned the trip, led by Assistant Principal Megan Bonomolo, did an 
outstanding job of gathering our students, communicating with parents, and supporting the students 
through a very difficult couple of days. Senator John Kerry's office gave the students and staff a great 



236 



deal of support. The staff who attended the trip was recognized at a School Committee IVleeting and the 
Grade 8 Moving-On Ceremony in June. 
Highlights and Activities 

September : Grade 5 and 6 student open houses; Grade 8 team-building trip to Cranes Beach, Parent 
open houses, Grades 5 & 6 Afternoon Social, Grades 7 & 8 Dance. 

October : PTO Magazine Drive, Grade 7 - Understanding Diversity Program, Grade 5 trip to Lowell Mills, 
Grade 7 trip on Marine Biology to Nahant, Parent Coffee with the Principal, Diversity Dance for Grades 7 
& 8, School wide mock presidential election. 

November: Day of Respect, Day of Respect presentation for K-12 teachers sponsored by Middle School 
Parents and community, Band and Chorus concert, P.T.O. 

December: Fall play, choral concert, TLC Bowl-a-Thon, Grade 7 trip to "A Christmas Carol", Grade 8 trip 
to "Afternoon of One Act Plays". 

January: Parent coffee with the Principal, Grade 6 trip to The Museum of Science, PTO, 
End of Term II. 

February: Band/Chorus concert, Grade 6 trip to 5 Witts-Egyptian History, All school assembly-Brazilian 
Drummers, MEPA test administered, Parent Coffee with the Principal/PTO. 

March: Grade 8 Winter Tubing trip, Grade 7 trip to Kennedy Library, Grades 7 and * trip to ADL Youth 
Conference in Boston, Parent Coffee with the Principal, PTO, Grade 5 trip to Ferry Beach, Saco, Maine, 
MCAS Testing. 

April: MCAS testing, End of Term III, all-school assembly - History of Music, Mr. Watson and Ms. Larson 
travel to China to teach, DARE graduation. Grade 4 classroom visits. Grade 4 parent meeting - 
transitioning to the Middle School. 

May: Parent Information Evenings - planning the transition to Middle School. ADL Breakfast - Mr. 
Watson a selected speaker. Middle School Night of Excellence, MCAS. 

June: Grade 8 trip to Washington, D.C., Grade 5 trip to New England Aquarium, First Move-Up Day, 
Choral concert, Grade 8 Moving On Ceremony. 
HIGH SCHOOL 
Staffing: 

New Staff: Bryan Menegoni Assistant Principal 

Ana Monteiro Mathematics 

MaryAlice Murdoch Content Leader Mathematics 

Susan Haggerty Content Leader Social Studies 

Christopher Kertyzak Science 

Richard McCarron Science 
Resignations: Meredith Reardon Guidance 

Elisabeth Drinkwater Foreign Language 

Christine DiPilato Assistant Principal 

Academic Highlights 

The NEASC work for our accreditation visit in the fall of 2010 is proceeding on schedule. This 
year during Common Planning Time, teams worked on completing a mission statement that was 
approved by the School Committee and rubrics that have tentatively been approved. Each time 
represents a standard. 

ELA MCAS results have indicated that Swampscott High School students have continued to 
improve in both the Advanced and Proficient scores while lowering the Needs Improvement category. 
Good news and a credit to the work of the staff in both middle and high school as well as the work being 
done in curriculum, instruction, and assessment. 

Close to 80% of our students will be attending four-year colleges next fall with another 12% 
attending two-year colleges. Other options for our students are the military (2.7%), college prep schools 
(1.6%) and undecided (2.2%). 

Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) is a 21^' century approach to learning and 
an initiative the high school has embraced. One of our physics teachers, Chris Kertyzak, has received a 
grant to work in this area with an applied physics class. Plans are being made throughout the district as 
well to promote this worthwhile learning experience. 

The "Key3 Literacy Program" was piloted here throughout the year with the goal of improving our 
students' writing skills. Teachers have been chained in all disciplines and the hope is that it will be 
expanded throughout the high school next year. 



237 



Two of our content leaders, Bernie Kravitz and Mary Alice Murdoch, have participated in the Pre- 
Advanced Placement training program to train other teachers at the high school how to prepare students 
for Advanced Placement courses. 
Social/Civic Highlights 

Over 100 students at the high school participated in the Leadership Symposium designed and 
implemented by Dr. Malone and community member Alice Goldsmith. Students met three times during 
the year and participated in groups led by successful local community members. Guest speakers with a 
specific message were also part of the experience. 

The entire school curriculum stood still for a day as students organized and implemented a 
"Wellness Day" creating an awareness of the importance of physical, mental, and emotional health. 
Students were organized into groups and participated in worl<shops led by experts in various fields of 
health and fitness. 

A group of students organized the high school's first Cancer Support Group. The goal was to 
bring students together who have someone presently struggling with the disease or those who have lost a 
loved one to cancer. This was supported by adjustment counselor Tom Healey and wellness teacher 
Buck Harris and an outside therapist. 

The School Council had a successful year with the piloting of a Career Mentoring Project in 
concert with the business community. Working with the Executive Director of the Lynn Chamber of 
Commerce, 28 juniors were paired with adults from the Chamber and the Swampscott Rotary Club to 
explore possible career paths. They have also been working on a School Profile for the NEASC report. 
The council is made up of teachers, students, parents, community members and the principal. 

The Athletic Council has reviewed the handbook and made an important change in eligibility of 
our students. After researching other communities, the standard for eligibility was raised. Students must 
now be passing all their subjects and can have no lower than a "70" GPA to participate in a sport. Under 
the old policy of the minimum standards set by the MIAA, students could fail subjects and still participate. 
The School Committee approved the change for next year. 

The musical and art show held in the spring was a huge success. Students performed in the 
musical "Anything Goes" with great professionalism and the art students displayed their work to the 
community's amazement Several of our art students have competed in the state area contests and have 
received recognition as gold, silver and bronze winners. Again, our students demonstrated their 
enormous talent in these venues. 

Swampscott High School and the Swampscott Senior Center were visited by a team from the 
National Federation of High Schools. After interviewing and filming members from the town, school, and 
senior center, the team's conclusion was that we are the perfect example of how a community can work 
together for a common purpose. The film of the experience is in development and will be shown at the 
National Federation of High Schools national convention in Chicago in July. 

Our Athletic Program continues to grow and have success. Participation is up and new sports 
are being developed. As an example a "sailing club" is being planned that will join sports such as 
wrestling, gymnastics, lacrosse, etc., that have been instituted in the last few years. Both girls' and boys' 
soccer teams, field hockey and football participated in the fall playoffs. Of course in the winter, the most 
impressive success story was the girls' varsity basketball team. They captured the first ever Girls' 
Basketball State Championship with a win over undefeated Quabog Regional at the Centrum in 
Worcester. Two players, Tara NImkar and Ali Beaulieu, surpassed the 1,000 point barrier with Tara 
becoming the school's all-time leading scorer for girls. 

The school year was culminated by a beautiful graduation ceremony on June 7 at Blocksidge 
Field. There were 1 92 graduates on that day that celebrated their academic accomplishments, 
scholarship recognition, and the hopes of the future echoed by the chosen speakers. 



238 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS 



The Town received approximately 64-inches of snow (twenty inches above the annual 
average), which not only taxed the Department of Public Works employees, but the budget as 
well. There were no fewer than fourteen sanding/salting operations which in itself exhausted the 
entire snow removal budget. On top of that, there were six significant snow falls that required the 
Town to contract independent plow operators to assist in the snow removal operations; the 
largest one being on December 19 when the Town was blanketed with close to one foot of snow. 
The sixteen-man DPW work force, which was short three men throughout the entire winter 
season due to work related injuries, should be commended for their dedication to assuring that 
the Town streets were as safe as humanly possible. Once again, a job well done! 

In April, Mr. Michael Collins retired from his position with the Department of Public Works 
after 23 years of service. The Director of Public Works would like to thank Mr. Collins for his many 
years of dedicated service to the Town of Swampscott. Additionally, a second employee left the 
Department which leaving the total number of DPW employees' at fourteen. The labor force, as it 
currently stands, continues to serve the Town well with its limited manpower. To supplement the 
limited work force the Department contracts out landscaping services for Town owned parks and 
other public areas, Leahy Landscaping has been awarded the landscaping contract for the eighth 
consecutive year. The Department continues to work cooperatively with other Boards, 
Committees, Commissions, Town Departments and residents, and would like to thank them for all 
their shared cooperation during the past year. 

For the eighteenth year, the Department was a recipient of the "Tree City USA" award. 
Through general funding the Department was able to plant close to twenty-four trees at various 
locations around the Town, and is committed to planting more trees in the coming years, as well 
as, maintaining our existing trees. Unfortunately, the Department took down over twenty trees 
due to them either being diseased or dead. On top of the twenty odd trees that the Department 
removed. National Grid took down three of the largest trees in Town. The three trees, two on 
Stetson Ave and one on Franklin Ave, were close to 100 years old and were deemed a hazard to 
the electric company's grid. The Department also conducted three Tree Hearings during the 
course of the year. Each hearing provided residents with the opportunity to speak for, or against, 
the removal of potentially hazardous trees throughout the Town. This year, our own crew took 
down the trees with the assistance of a recently purchased 55-foot aerial bucket truck. The 
bucket truck was funded through the support of the Capital Improvement Committee, and allows 
for the Department to promptly remove and prune trees that may be presenting a danger to the 
community. The bucket truck has also been instrumental in providing assistance to the School 
and Police Departments. 

For the ninth year out of the past ten, the Department continued to take advantage of the 
Massachusetts Water Resource Authority's (MWRA) Local Pipeline Assistance Program to 
continue improving the Town's water main infrastructure. With this interest free loan, the Town 
was able to install new eight inch water mains on Galloupes Point Road, Galloupes Terrace, and 
Williams Terrace. Additionally, new hydrants and line gates were installed on all the 
aforementioned streets. The quarterly water/sewer billing cycle has continued to result in 
additional revenue to the Town. In February, again with the assistance of the MWRA, the Town 
conducted a comprehensive water leak detection survey. During the survey a total of ten leaks 
were discovered, four main leaks and six service leaks, resulting in an estimated loss of 163,000 
gallons per day. The Water Division was quite busy over the course of the year, repairing eight 
water main breaks, and an abnormally high twenty service leaks. The largest water main break 
occurred on March 1 0, and resulted in the Town of Swampscott being the lead story on all the 
local news channels. The Water Division continues to be responsible for bi-monthly water 
samples that ensure that the water quality is safe for consumption for the residents of the Town of 
Swampscott. The Town also undergoes semi-annual testing for both lead and copper, which is 
also monitored by the MWRA. This past year, as in previous years, tests have consistently shown 
no indications of any health hazards associated with the Town's potable water supply. The Water 
Division was also responsible for the winterization of the 450 plus hydrants in Town, as well as 
the removal and replacement of 250 seasonal irrigation meters. 



239 



The Sewer Division with the assistance of outside contractors re-built ten catch basins, 
cleaned approximately 250 storm drains, and repaired a combined seven drain and sewer and 
main breaks. The Sewer Division was responsible for the freeing up of numerous sewer 
blockages throughout the year. Most of these blockages occurred outside the regular work day 
which results in many hours of overtime for the already shorthanded crew. The Department also 
issued 137 street opening permits to private contractors resulting in $13,700.00 of additional 
revenue to the Town. The Department continues to function successfully under an enterprise fund 
system for both sewer and water. Unfortunately, for the second consecutive year, both the sewer 
and water rates needed to be increased to help offset increasing expenses. The future goal of the 
Department remains to be able to fund capital projects through surplus funds, while keeping the 
rates at an equitable figure. 

With the use of Chapter 90 aid from the Massachusetts Highway Department, the 
Department of Public Works was able to secure funding to pave New Ocean Street and Paradise 
Road (from Burrili Street to Farragut Road). Also, with the use of Chapter 90 aid from the 
Massachusetts Highway Department, the Department of Public Works was able fund the long 
overdue roadway improvements to the Stetson Ave/ Essex Street intersection. This $275,000.00 
project could not have been completed without the support of the Swampscott Police Department, 
the Town's Traffic Study Committee, and the Town Administrator. Additionally, approximately 
7,000 square feet of asphalt sidewalk were replaced town wide, and we are committed to 
continuing this yearly project to help provide safer conditions for pedestrians using the sidewalks 
in Swampscott. The Highway Division continues to maintain our parks and beaches, and is 
responsible for: street line painting, grass cutting, street sweeping, and litter control. The street 
sweeper was busy keeping the Town roads clean, being out for not less that a week during the 
months of July, August, September, March, April, May, and June. The Highway Division was also 
responsible for the placing over 100 ton of asphalt, both hot and cold mix, in the hundreds of 
potholes that developed over the winter months. In-house paving became a staple of the Highway 
Division this past year with over 250 ton of asphalt roadways being replaced by members of the 
DPW staff. Further, significant portions of both the Town's football and main soccer fields were 
re-sodded by the Parks Department. The Parks Department also devoted over 1000 man hours 
to marking athletic fields for school sanctioned events, and planted over 900 flowers on the 
Swampscott Monument. 

The Cemetery Division was responsible for eighty-one interments and nineteen 
cremations, as well as, the overall maintenance of over thirty acres of landscape. Additionally, the 
Cemetery Division planted close to 2500 flowers as part of the Swampscott Cemetery's perpetual 
care. This past year, the Cemetery Division repaired over a dozen headstones that have lain in a 
state of disrepair for the last several years. 

The Department is quite proud of the fact that they were able to complete several 
significant in-house projects that were accomplished at a substantial savings to the Town. The list 
of projects includes: the installation of granite curbing at the intersection of Puritan Road and 
Phillips Beach Ave, the repair of the floats at Fisherman's Beach, and the ongoing replacement of 
the street signs that now meet State specifications. 

The Department, with the donations form several generous residents of the Town of 
Swampscott, completed the replacement of the park benches at the World War II Memorial. The 
memorial benches provide an aesthetic upgrade to the antiquated concrete benches that were 
replaced, and the Department is now undertaking a similar project that will replace the unsightly 
trash barrels along Humphrey Street. 

The Engineering Department was instrumental in overseeing the rehabilitation of the 
Phillips Beach outfall as well as the videoing and repair of close to three miles of sewer and drain 
lines. The Engineering Department also oversaw the testing of 176 back flow devices that was 
mandated by the Department of Environmental Protection. Finally, I would be remiss if I did not 
thank the office staff, which continues to provide ongoing dedication and services to the residents 
of the Town of Swampscott. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Gino A. Cresta Jr. 
Director of Public Works 



240 



RECREATION DEPARTMENT 



MISSION STATEMENT 

The Recreation Department provides the community with leisure time activities for adults 
and children. This includes beaches and lifeguards, sailing lessons, tennis, track and field, 
basketball, soccer, playground programs and a teen recreation center. In winter months 
we offer enrichment programs for both adults and children. We also provide beach and 
railroad stickers and collect field usage fees. 

The Recreation Department has been working closely with the schools, youth sports 
groups and the DPW to create a field utilization schedule and a Field use and 
maintenance program so that we may continue to use and maintain our new sports fields 
properly. 

Our Sailing Program continues to grow. We meet monthly with the Friends of 
Swampscott Sailing which is a non-profit organization that promotes sailing in our 
community. This year we added a beginner racing program to our racing program. We 
also worked with the school to develop the first High School racing team. Safety as well 
as developing life long sailors continues as our main goal for this program. 

During the summer months we added a Basketball Camp as well as an Art Camp to our 
popular Playground Program and Teen Program. 

In the fall we sponsored a Turkey Hunt and in December a Breakfast with Santa as 
community events. 

Our Adult winter Programs include Open Weight Room and Men's Over Forty 
Basketball. 

In the winter months we have Girl's Travel Basketball, Indoor Soccer, Track, Youth 
Basketball and Skiing. 

The Recreation Department looks forward to adding new programs with input from the 
community each year. 

Respectfially submitted, 

Danielle Strauss 
Recreation Director 



Jennifer Nesbit 
Debra Mentuck 
Susan Byrne 



RECREATION COMMISSION 

Mary Webster 
Patty Pederson 



241 



ANhRJAL REPORT 
SWAMPSCOTT SENIOR CENTER 
July 2008 - June 2009 

The Swampscott Senior Center has continued to provide services 
and social opportunities for the senior citizens in our community. Our 
data collection indicates tliat 1 139 seniors have utilized our services 
this year. Our programs include: a variety of exercise programs, art, 
bridge, mahjongg, poker club, cribbage club, men's club, knitting, 
dance, beano, walking groups, bowling, golf, theater trips, lunch trips, 
arts and craft projects, singing and many special events each month. 

The Senior Center is open from 8:30 to 3:00 Monday, Tuesday and 
Thursday. We have a delayed opening at 10:30am on Wednesday and 
Friday due to budget cuts during this fiscal year. In addition, the 
Center opens two evenings for cribbage and contract bridge as part of 
the weekly schedule. As a town facility, we often open our space to 
town committees or boards for their evening meetings. This year we 
have participated in several intergenerational programs. Our major 
endeavor was with the Stanley School as we continued our Pen Pal 
Project. We continued outreach work on several projects in the high 
school. Our primary contribution was to establish a library corps 
volunteer group to help keep the library open as the librarian was now 
shared between the middle school and the high school. In addition, the 
seniors utilize the dance studio, the gymnasium and the computer labs 
for various activities. Students came to chat, and to perform. Several 
high school students will help us implement computer programs. This 
will range from general use to specific programs such as photo shop. 
Program your cell phone will be implemented in February and many 
seniors are eager to have voice mail or address books added to their 
calling ability. In the spring, our seniors will assist the grade four 
classes in their study of the history of Swampscott. Many will pair up 
with student reporters and talk about what it was like to grow up in 
Swampscott back in the day. What it was like to be part of WWII or 
the Korean or Vietnam Wars. The program possibilities are extensive. 
The staff tries to listen and respond to as many ideas as we can. Those 
who come to play Beano on Tuesday and Friday are many of our older 
seniors who depend on our van for transportation to both the Senior 
Center and to do their shopping and errands.. 

Staffing at the Senior Center has changed during this year. The 
position of volunteer coordinator was eliminated to enable us to keep a 
much needed administrative assistant. We also added a data clerk to 
help maintain accurate records of enrolled members and their level of 
participation in our programs so that we can determine what is 
successful and what needs to be reconsidered. Our directors share 
responsibility for the center and each work three days or eighteen hours 
per week. Budget constraints have resulted in cutting hours for all staff 
members. 

Our meals provided by GLSS are nutritious and delicious. The cost 
of $2.00 is appealing to many who are living with limited incomes. 
Our lunch bunch has expanded to approximately thirty to forty each 
day. GLSS has added a feature of a special meal each month often the 
chef arrives with the food and discusses both preparation and nutrition. 
We also have special event luncheons for holidays and other occasions. 
For example, The Abbott House will provide a discussion on healthy 



242 



eating followed by a luncheon. They also invite us annually to lunch at 
their facility followed by a bingo game with prizes and other freebies. 
Monthly we sponsor a mystery lunch with the support of an 
Enrichment Grant; we take our seniors out to lunch. These can be 
hilarious affairs. Our van travels to Vinnin Square and The Tri City 
shopping area four days per week. Our van drivers assist the shoppers 
with their bundles and have the patience of saints. 

Another mandate for our Senior Center is to provide our seniors with 
information about health insurance, prescription programs, and 
information on health and welfare in your senior years in general. 
Guest speakers are scheduled. We have regularly scheduled podiatrist 
services, hearing tests, and legal consul. We assist with running the 'flu 
shot clinic'. We provide blood pressure screening twice weekly. The 
Swampscott Senior Center Men's Club is well attended. Each month 
they meet for a special luncheon and guest speaker. The men also 
bowl, play golf, and cribbage. Two annual events are planned with 
care, the Holiday gathering and the Men's plus wife luncheon at the 
Porthole to kick of the year. Warren Hopkins, our outreach worker, is 
the resource for our Men's Club. 

The Senior Center supports and participates in TRIAD. In 
collaboration with the Police and Fire Department, the Triad Council 
develops and implements programs to reduce criminal victimization, 
promote crime prevention, and safety awareness while serving the 
needs of the senior community of Swampscott. 

There have been many special events this past year. They range 
from our annual events including a holiday party for botli the men's 
club and the general population. We sponsored a Patriot Day event 
with songs and history as well as a special lunch. We have had several 
groups come to perform from a barber shop quartet to several student 
accapella groups. One of the most delightful groups was the Hadley 
School Choir. They were adorable. Our popularity is such that we 
must now limit our special events to eighty five to ninety people by 
selling tickets in advance. The Senior Center is warm and welcoming. 
Everyone is greeted and our seniors now share a sense of community. 
They care for each other and are grateful for the socialization and 
friendships that have been the result of coming to The Swampscott 
Senior Center. 

Overall this has been a very successfiil year. Thank you to the staff and 
our board for all the help as our new location helps us meet our mission 
goals for Swampscott's Senior Citizens. 



243 



Technology Department 



Fiscal 2009 was an uneventful year for technology. The year was mostly spent 
maintaining existing infrastructure. 

In Town Hall, we consolidated two old, outdated servers onto one Linux XenServer, and 
replaced the Town's financial server. In addition to that, we continued to replace the older 
machines on a rotating basis. This year, 5 pc's and 2 printers were replaced in Town Hall. I 
continue to work with the Police Department, Fire Department, and Library with regards to any 
technology issues that may arise. Several computers were provided to the Police station and Fire 
station, and a printer was purchased for the Library. In addition, we began to migrate all users to 
Office 2007 from Office 2003. 

Communication and joint efforts are ongoing with the school department to streamline 
and provide redundancy for the Town and School's infrastructure. With the assistance of the 
School's Technology Department, the Swampscott Senior Center's technology needs are 
maintained. 

I am looking forward to FY2010 and the continued maintenance of the Town's 
Technology needs. 



Respectfully Submitted 
Denise M. Dembkoski 

Treasurer/Collector/Network Specialist 



244 



2009 ANNUAL REPORT OF TOWN COUNSEL 



Town Counsel responded to a number of requests for opinions from Town officials on a wide 
variety of issues and represented the Town in several pending court actions and at an arbitration. We 
advised the Board of Selectmen, Town officials and various Town boards and committees on numerous 
issues, including zoning appeals, planning issues, town meeting procedure, amendments to bylaws, 
election issues, real estate and title issues, labor and personnel matters, procurement, construction and 
contract issues, comprehensive permit issues, the sale of several Town-owned parcels, and various other 
general municipal matters. 

As always, we strive to provide speedy, accurate and cost effective responses to requests for 
advisory opinions. Town Counsel has represented the Town and its officers in several litigation matters, 
including proceedings in Superior Court and Land Court. We have worked hard to provide effective 
representation of the Town in all of the Town's pending litigation, and we continue to achieve successful 
results on behalf of the Town. 

Town Counsel has continued to work with the Town to reduce municipal legal costs, by 
researching many issues of municipal law and mailing memoranda addressing those issues at no charge 
to the Town. For example, in the last twelve months, we have advised the Town with regard to the 
implementation of the act decriminalizing small amounts of marijuana, the Green Communities Act, the 
Federal Pool and Spa Safety Regulations, placement of permanent monuments in public parks, 
certificates of constructive approval, changes to the Open Meeting Law, exceptions to public construction 
laws, identity theft prevention requirements, amendments to the Conflict of Interest Law, as well as FCC 
time limits for wireless siting decisions, and many other timely municipal topics. 

We have attended meetings of various Town boards at the Town's request, and with permission 
of the Board of Selectmen or Town Administrator, to provide advice on the sale of Town-owned 
properties, permit applications, pending litigation and for the purposes of risk management. 

Town Counsel's objective continues to be to provide high quality legal services to the Town in a 
responsive and timely manner at a reasonable cost. 

We extend our appreciation to the Board of Selectmen and Town Administrator for their 
confidence in retaining this firm, and we appreciate the assistance and cooperation we have received on 
all matters from the Board of Selectmen, Town Administrator and other Town boards and personnel. We 
look forward to working with members of the Swampscott town government in the future. 

Respectfully submitted, 



Leonard Kopelman, for the firm 
of Kopelman and Paige, P.C., 
Town Counsel 



389769/SWAM/8888 



245 



TREASURER 

Denise M. Dembkoski 



Treasurer's Cash Statement 

In account with the Town of Swampscott: 

Balance on hand July 1 . 2008: $1 0,043,201 

Receipts and Income from all sources: $67,910,265 

Less warrants paid (payroll and vendor): ($67,952,307) 

Balance on hand June 30, 2009: $10,001.159 

Interest income earned 07/01/08 - 06/30/09: $95,344 



TOWN OF SWAMPSCOTT TRUST AND SPECIAL FUNDS 

Balance Deposits Interest Withdrawals Balance 

07/01/08 06/30/09 

Cemetery Gifts & Bequeaths $82,140 $1,349 $83,489 

Cemetery Perpetual Care $429,685 $11,220 $7,473 $448,378 

Library - General Library Trust $55,065 $1,270 ($170) $56,166 

Library - Linscott Trust $52,087 $1,155 ($679) $52,563 

Library - Hussey Trust $25,559 $746 ($8,033) $18,272 

Library - Johnson Trust $50 $1 $51 

Stabilization Account $515,292 $70,000 $12,999 $598,291 

Conservation Fund $98,215 $788 $1,516 $100,518 

Phillips Medal $3,242 $53 $3,295 

MWRA Program $30,899 $507 ($31,407) ($0) 

Performance Bonds $56,248 $56,248 

War Memorial Fund $118,187 $836 $2,068 ($4,400) $116,691 

Totals $1,466,669 $82,843 $29,139 ($44,689) $1,533,961 



Respectfully Submitted. 

Denise M. Dembkoski 
Treasurer 



246 



OFFICE OF VETERANS' SERVICES 



The Office of Veterans' Services was establistied and is mandated by the Massachusetts 
Legislature under Massachusetts General Law Chapter 115. Veterans' Services is available to provide 
any and all assistance to veterans and their families and to assure that they receive all benefits that they 
may be entitled to. These benefits may be procured through the Massachusetts Department of Veterans 
Services, the United States Veterans Administration, the Social Security Administration as well as any 
other Governmental agency or private organization designed to provide assistance to our veterans and 
their families. All financial aid disbursements from this office through the Massachusetts Department of 
Veterans Services to needy veterans and their families are eligible for a 75% reimbursement from the 
Commonwealth of Massactiusetts providing the proper monthly application for reimbursement has been 
made in a timely manner. Swampscott is currently receiving the maximum reimbursement of 75% for all 
of our disbursements from this office. A recent legislative bill eliminated the "wartime service" 
requirement, which virtually allows all veterans regardless of dates of service to be eligible for aid and 
assistance from the Massachusetts Department of Veterans Services. With a vast majority of our active 
duty, reserve and national guardsmen and women serving on active duty overseas in support of 
Operation Iraqi Freedom, or Operation Enduring Freedom the numbers of veterans seeking assistance 
has risen accordingly. Currently one of the most sought after benefits are for Military Honors to be 
rendered at a veteran's funeral. It is estimated that Veterans are currently passing away at a rate of over 
1000 a day in the United States, The local funeral homes are well prepared for the request for Military 
Honors, however, should a problem arise, many families seek assistance from this office to ensure their 
loved one receives the proper "Honors" to which they are entitled. 



VETERANS COUNCIL 

The Veterans Affairs Committee was disbanded and a "Veterans Council" for the Town of 
Swampscott was formed in the fall of 2006. The Council is a 7 member board comprised of the Towns 
Veteran Service Officer, as well as the Commanders and one appointee for each of the 3 Veteran 
Organizations that are based in Swampscott, the Veterans of Foreign Wars, the American Legion, and 
the Marine Corps League. We will also be adding members from the Disabled American Veterans who 
are now based in Swampscott as well. The Council is charged with maintaining a heightened state of 
awareness of our veterans and current active duty military personnel, through events and memorials. 



VETERANS DAY 

The annual observance of Veterans Day began at 1 1 :00. A combined Color Guard from Boston 
University ROTC represented the Swampscott VFW, American Legion and the Marine Corps League 
marched into place at Thomson Circle on Monument Avenue. Officiating the event was Retired US Navy 
Captain and Chaplin, Reverend Dean Pedersen who reminded us that it is incumbent upon all of us to 
remember our veterans and the sacrifices they have made to ensure our freedoms and to always keep 
the memory of those we have lost... alive in our hearts. Attendees, who included members of the Board of 
Selectmen, Chief Ronald Madigan as well as other local officials, honored and prayed for our servicemen 
and women who are currently serving in harms way and for the Harris and Raymond families. Following 
the service a rifle salute was fired by members of Boston Universities ROTC, followed by taps and a 
bagpipe rendition of Amazing Grace concluding the ceremony. We experienced a large turnout for the 
event this year as many veterans and family members turned out for the dedication of the new, long 
awaited. Desert Shield/Desert Storm monument. Swampscott resident and US Navy Master Chief David 
DiPietro served as guest speaker and gave an outstanding speech prior to the unveiling of the new 
monument. This monument was paid for fully through the generous donations of the residents and 
businesses of Swampscott. Our thanks to the Swampscott DPW for the site preparation and foundation 
for our new monument. The monument now stands along Monument Ave across from Town Hall. 
As with Memorial Day, this annual ceremony is open to any and all of any age, and all are encouraged to 
attend. 



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MEMORIAL DAY 



As has been the tradition for several years, the Principal of the Stanley School, Ms. Pamela 
Angelakis, and several of the 4*'^ grade teachers brought volunteers from Stanley School two weeks prior 
to Memorial Day to place U.S. flags on the graves of veterans at Swampscott Cemetery. Also assisting 
with this task in the days leading up to Memorial Day is the local troop of Boy Scouts, and volunteers from 
the various Veteran organizations here in town. These groups, along with several other volunteers, 
placed well over 1000 flags. Their desire to "remember" our veterans in this truly special way is heart 
warming and greatly appreciated. On Memorial Day, St. Johns the Baptist Church held it's annual 10:00 
AM Mass followed by a wreath laying at the flagpole overlooking Swampscott harbor in the lot at St. 
Johns. The wreath laying serves as a reminder of, and is in honor of all those who have been lost at sea 
while serving their country. Participants and attendees assembled at the Swampscott cemetery at 12:00 
Noon, Color Guards representing the VFW, American Legion the Marine Corps League combined served 
as "colors" representatives. The annual service was officiated by Reverend Dean Pedersen. The 
ceremony was well attended by many members of the Board of Selectmen, State Senator Thomas 
McGee, Police Chief Ronald Madigan, as well as many other town officials and numerous town residents. 
A wreath was placed in honor of all veterans past, present and future. A rifle salute was performed by 
members of the VFW, American Legion and Marine Corps League, taps were sounded and a bagpipe 
performance concluded the ceremony. This annual ceremony is held every Memorial Day and is open to 
all and all are encouraged to attend. 



Respectfully Submitted, 



Jim Schultz 

Veterans Service Officer 



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SWAMPSCOTT WAR MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

Trustees 
Joseph J. Balsama. Co-Chairman 
Duncan H. Maitland, Co-Chairman 
Jean F. Rearcton, Secretary 
Thomas H. White, Jr., Douglas B Maitland 
Bartiara F. EWridge 
Hugh M. Schuttz 

General Information 

A $10,000 scholarship fund was established by vote of Town meeting on March 26, 1950 as a perpetual 
memorial to those who sen/ed in the Military Service defending our freedom. The scholarship was awarded in 1951 for 
$250. In 1964, the Town meeting appropriated an additional $10,000. Since that time, gills have been received from 
numerous Individuals and organizations in memory of loved relatives and friends. To date 289 Swampscott High 
School students have been awarded scholarship totaling $1 17,650. 

Distributions of Funds 

Beginning with fiscal year 2008. the distribution of the War Memorial Scholarship amounts were divided as 
follows: $1,400 (TheEmestManchinMemorialScholarship);$1,000, $1,000, and $1000. The total of $4,400 
remained, but there were four awardees instead of instead of five. 

Details of Changes In the Fund Balance 

Balance as of 7/1/08 $118,187:00 
Donations $836.00 
Interest (7/1/08 - 6/30//09 $2 , 068 , 00 

TOTAL $121, 651.00. 

Scholarships' awarded, July 1, 2009 $4,400.00 
Balance, June 30, 2009 $116,691.00 
Four Scholarships were awarded in July 2009 as follows: 

$1 ,400 (Ernest Manchin Memorial Scholarship) Robert M. Kane New York University 

$1,000 Allison M. Beaulieu Bates College 

$1,000 TaraN. Nimkar University of Michigan 

$1,000 Patrick H. DeChillo Vassar 

The trustees wish to thank everyone, who made donations to the Swampscott War Memorial Scholarship 
Fund. Through your generosity, we are able to build up equity in the fund thereby providing the opportunity for 
additional income from which the awards are granted. Each year a few Swampscott High School graduates, who 
continue on to higher education, will receive some finarrcial assistance. 

HONOR ROLL OF CURRENT DONORS (July 1, 2008 • June 30, 2009) 

AFSCME LOCAL 2968, Mr. & Mrs. Richard G. Baker, Mr. & Mrs. Joseph J. Balsama, Cynthia Lang, Douglas 
Maitland, Duncan Maitland, Dr. & Mrs. John Nolan, Mr. & Mrs. Frederick Nohetty, Jr., Mr. & Mrs. Charies H. Popp, Jr., 
Adele Ruthman, Catherine Valleriani, 



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Zoning Board of Appeals 



The Swampscott Zoning Board of Appeals had a very productive and successful fiscal year 2009 (July 
2008 - June 2009). At the July 2008 Public Hearing, The ZBA continued its practice of annually electing 
new officers and at that time appointed Donald M. Hause as Chairman and Peter Spellios, Esquire as Vice 
Chairman. In addition, Linda Paster, the ZBA's long-time Secretary resigned and was replaced by Helen 
Kennedy who had served in that capacity in the past on an interim basis. Other than those appointments, 
the Board remained unchanged from the prior fiscal year and included Harry Pass, Esquire, Dan Doherty, 
Esquire as regular members with Mark Kornitzky, Esquire and Andrew Rose remaining as Associate 
Members. The ability to constitute a five member board from seven available members ensured that 
petitioners received a quorum at each hearing which enabled The Board to deliver expedited, unbiased 
decisions. 

During FY 2009, in addition to considering many residential petitions, the Board also considered a 
number of commercial petitions which led to the addition of many new businesses in Vinin Square. In 
each instance, the Board took careful measure to evaluate the specific merits of each petition individually 
including the opinions of abutters and concerned citizens, technical information, conformance with all 
applicable regulations/laws from all governmental agencies having jurisdiction, and the overall benefit to 
the Town. 

FY 2009 also saw the updating of the Zoning By-Laws, which were officially adopted at Town 
Meeting on May 2, 2009. The new By-Laws endeavored to address some of the ambiguities present in 
earlier versions, and expanded the Board's role in terms of Site Plan review and the subsequent approval 
process. The Board also implemented a more streamlined procedure by which Petitions would be filed 
including standardizing the documentation that would be required, such as plans, property surveys, and 
technical information. 

Respectfully submitted, 



Donald M. Hause, 
Chairman 



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